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My post about U turns generated 23 resopnses, lots of good advise like useing your rear brake along with the throttle and counter balancing into the turn. Now I have another situation, suppose a rider is in a narrow space and tries to execute a U turn using the brake and throttle along with leaning into the turn and about half way thru the U turn he can see he is not going to make it. At this point he still has time to strighten up and stop but what if he is to far into the turn and leaned over and doesn't have time to strighten up and stop. At this point will he be able to hold the bike up and stop?
Terry in AZ.
 

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The mistake there I think is being "leaned into the turn". For a slow U-Turn, the scooter should be just about upright - that is the reason for shifting your weight to the opposite direction of the turn. If the rider is in fact learned into the turn and jams on the brakes, he/she will need a lot of strength (leg & upper body) to keep the scooter from going down. It would be a very awkward situation.

If the scooter is nearly upright, the rider would just straighten the front wheel and hit the brakes. This can be done in about 1 second, and the stop would be easily managed.

That is my take on it. If I am wrong, I am sure someone will jump in and correct me.
 

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pauljo said:
If the scooter is nearly upright, the rider would just straighten the front wheel and hit the brakes. This can be done in about 1 second, and the stop would be easily managed.
I think Paul hit it on the nose. You wouldn't be leaning the bike in a slow tight turn - just counterbalance with your butt or by pressing down with your foot and putting your weight on the outside floorboard. :D
Don
 

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Terry

No disrespect intended but I think you do think abut this too much.

You are well into the over analysis phase.

Get out and practice and you will develop the control and importantly a feel for the bike. The sort of speed you tackle U turns is generally walking pace or less - you can (and must be able to) stop at anytime.

If you are leaning the bike (and I do) then the opposit shift of bodyweight will bring it upright fast and without problem.

Lets face it the dynamics involved are no different to riding a bicycle ( well - standfast engine control) and I bet you do not give analysis of that any concious thought.
 

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NormanB said:
If you are leaning the bike (and I do) then the opposit shift of bodyweight will bring it upright fast and without problem.
Like Norman, for REALLY tight, slow turns I do lean the bike, and I counterbalance with opposite lean. Normally I lean with the bike, but at slow speeds there's less gyroscopic effect to keep me from falling over; so I lean in the opposite direction.

When doing it this way, if you have to stop, no problem: you are already in perfect balance -- bike to the left / body to the right, or bike to the right / body to the left. Everything is equal. The bike won't be leaning that far anyway, not like taking a sweeper at 60MPH.

It's harder to describe than it is to do. As Norman says, just go out and practice. You'll soon pick up an intuitive feel for it that all the analysis in the world can't match.

Last, but not least: Unless there is an examiner standing there with a clipboard, you can always put your feet down and walk through a tight U-turn at REALLY slow speed and just three-point it if it's too tight to complete.

HTH.
 

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Terry Kiernan said:
... suppose a rider is in a narrow space and tries to execute a U turn ...
Terry, I don't know anything about your riding experience but I've been riding motorcycles for over 30 years and I still powerwalk in tight spaces. If you really feel a need to use the counterweight technique, you have to practice in a safe place until you become proficient. In the meantime, relax, put your feet down and walk it around. It ain't pretty, but it works.
 
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