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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I recently repaired a broken ignition switch. The fault was that half of the hollow protrusion at the end of the ignition barrel had broken off. This mates up with the long shaft to operate the ignition switch, seat latch and steering lock. My first repair attempt was to fill the mating hole with epoxy, shove in the remaining half of the protrusion and let it all set. This was a failure, as pushing the key to operate the seat lock became too much and the good remaining half soon broke off with the strain. (are you with me up to now? Please wake up at the back there!) The barrel is die-cast and is not practically solderable so I : filed the broken end of the barrel to smooth out any remaining broken bits and then centrally drilled and tapped it 5mm. I filed the hexagonal head of a 5mm bolt down to a rectangle shape measuring 5mm x 6mm to fit the mating hole in the long shaft mentioned above. I shortened the bolt length to about 3/8” and screwed it to align with the locating notch on the end of the barrel. I then drilled a 1mm hole through the barrel side and through the shank of the newly-made bolt and broke off the twist drill flush with the barrel thus making it a permanent pin to secure the bolt’s position. (this is not evident from the photos because of focussing distance with a phone camera) The result is a complete success. I hope all is clear from the photo’s.

The only problem was that the guy I repaired it for couldn’t wait to get back on the road and bought a new assembly for something like £240 ($360) .

I would add this tip: When you turn the ignition key for the seat lock it needs only enough to hear it click. The cable mechanism movement is only about 1/4 inch. If the key moves but doesn’t work the latch never try extra force or you may end up with a broken barrel protrusion and maybe heavy expense. Any questions - just ask.
 

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Did you replace all those stupid bolts when you put it back together ?

TheReaper!
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Did you replace all those stupid bolts when you put it back together ?

TheReaper!
There are two TORX bolts (for security) plus one 10mm nut that fasten the whole assembly to the bike frame - Torx adapters are easily available everywhere. (I could have replaced them very easily but I put them back to save me the trouble).

There are two domed security screws for fastening the assembly cover and two domed security screws at the end that fasten the ignition switch to the assembly - I hacksawed a screwdriver slot in each.
 

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peelbrow ... you imply that the actuator (protrusion) broke when he tried to open the seat latch, is that correct? My seat latch seems to require more force than it should, so I want to take some steps to prevent failure of the actuator while I have all the tupperware off. I assume my problem is dirt on the latch and dry/failed (no?) lubricant in the cable. For these things exposed to road dirt I like the overpriced but highly effective dry silicone lube I use on my sailboat hardware: http://www.mclubemarine.com/sailkote/
 

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Discussion Starter #5
peelbrow ... you imply that the actuator (protrusion) broke when he tried to open the seat latch, is that correct? My seat latch seems to require more force than it should, so I want to take some steps to prevent failure of the actuator while I have all the tupperware off. I assume my problem is dirt on the latch and dry/failed (no?) lubricant in the cable. For these things exposed to road dirt I like the overpriced but highly effective dry silicone lube I use on my sailboat hardware: http://www.mclubemarine.com/sailkote/
While you have the tupperware off I would recommend forming a funnel with a sheet of 'Bluetack' around where the latch cable joins the ignition assembly, filling it with WD40 or similar and leaving it to penetrate down the cable overnight and repeat if necessary. Also squirt oil into the keyhole.

The protrusion is simply a short 'hollow' stub which turns everything on or off. Why they made it hollow I can't imagine. It would be much stronger if it were solid.
 

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I recently repaired a broken ignition switch. The fault was that half of the hollow protrusion at the end of the ignition barrel had broken off. This mates up with the long shaft to operate the ignition switch, seat latch and steering lock. My first repair attempt was to fill the mating hole with epoxy, shove in the remaining half of the protrusion and let it all set. This was a failure, as pushing the key to operate the seat lock became too much and the good remaining half soon broke off with the strain. (are you with me up to now? Please wake up at the back there!) The barrel is die-cast and is not practically solderable so I : filed the broken end of the barrel to smooth out any remaining broken bits and then centrally drilled and tapped it 5mm. I filed the hexagonal head of a 5mm bolt down to a rectangle shape measuring 5mm x 6mm to fit the mating hole in the long shaft mentioned above. I shortened the bolt length to about 3/8” and screwed it to align with the locating notch on the end of the barrel. I then drilled a 1mm hole through the barrel side and through the shank of the newly-made bolt and broke off the twist drill flush with the barrel thus making it a permanent pin to secure the bolt’s position. (this is not evident from the photos because of focussing distance with a phone camera) The result is a complete success. I hope all is clear from the photo’s.

The only problem was that the guy I repaired it for couldn’t wait to get back on the road and bought a new assembly for something like £240 ($360) .

I would add this tip: When you turn the ignition key for the seat lock it needs only enough to hear it click. The cable mechanism movement is only about 1/4 inch. If the key moves but doesn’t work the latch never try extra force or you may end up with a broken barrel protrusion and maybe heavy expense. Any questions - just ask.
Good job peelbrow.......clever stuff.

I always push downward pressure on the passenger part of the seat with one hand, while turning the key to open, to try to stop the problem you highlight from happening.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
I now turn to the problem of the ignition-switch shutter, which stopped working some time ago. When I took it apart (3 screws) three very short cylindrical magnets and a 2mm ball-bearing fell out. I'll report back with pictures when I have figured it all out.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
I wonder if anyone knows anything about the switch shutter. I have it apart but have not yet figured how it works. In the picture the arrow points to a channel which looks as if it should contain some kind of (sliding?) mechanism but nothing was found there and I am pretty certain that it was like that from new. Clues anyone?
 

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No real idea as I've never taken it apart but that looks like where maybe a spring and detent ball might sit. Maybe to drop behind that lip as the shutter is closed.

What is that little piece on the right and where does it fit?
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
No real idea as I've never taken it apart but that looks like where maybe a spring and detent ball might sit. Maybe to drop behind that lip as the shutter is closed.

What is that little piece on the right and where does it fit?
That's what I thought too. Here are 4 more more pix. The black block is my own magnet and not part of the shutter, it is there to hold the three tiny magnets (which ARE part of the shutter and shown end-to-end to prevent them getting lost) - I assume they sit on top of the 3 tiny springs.
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
EUREKA! I know how the shutter actually works! See pix. There are 4 tiny magnets each sitting on top of a light non-magnetic coiled spring within 4 holes (B). On the other side of where the block end of the ignition key touches to operate the shutter, are 4 corresponding shallow holes (A) into which the magnets normally sit held there by the light springs and thus preventing movement without the correct key. When the magnetic key-block touches the shutter it repels the 4 tiny magnets thus 'pushing' them into their respective hole against the light springs and allowing the key to turn the shutter and once more lock into the 4 recesses (A) when the key is removed - thus locking the shutter and the ignition key 'hole' is covered up. Note there should be 4 springs and 4 magnets but I have only 3 magnets and 3 springs. I presume one fell out in times past and was lost. I know this is a bit of a wordy description but I hope I make it all clear. I'm sorry about the picture focus (none). I really must get a better camera!
 

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Thank you for explaining how the shutter works, have wondered about it. Now I know, thanks again.
 

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Although there are 4 holes IIRC there are only ever 3 magnets.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Although there are 4 holes IIRC there are only ever 3 magnets.
Thanks Norman, you've saved me a fruitless search. BTW: what does IIRC mean?
 

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I recently repaired a broken ignition switch. The fault was that half of the hollow protrusion at the end of the ignition barrel had broken off. This mates up with the long shaft to operate the ignition switch, seat latch and steering lock. My first repair attempt was to fill the mating hole with epoxy, shove in the remaining half of the protrusion and let it all set. This was a failure, as pushing the key to operate the seat lock became too much and the good remaining half soon broke off with the strain. (are you with me up to now? Please wake up at the back there!) The barrel is die-cast and is not practically solderable so I : filed the broken end of the barrel to smooth out any remaining broken bits and then centrally drilled and tapped it 5mm. I filed the hexagonal head of a 5mm bolt down to a rectangle shape measuring 5mm x 6mm to fit the mating hole in the long shaft mentioned above. I shortened the bolt length to about 3/8” and screwed it to align with the locating notch on the end of the barrel. I then drilled a 1mm hole through the barrel side and through the shank of the newly-made bolt and broke off the twist drill flush with the barrel thus making it a permanent pin to secure the bolt’s position. (this is not evident from the photos because of focussing distance with a phone camera) The result is a complete success. I hope all is clear from the photo’s.

The only problem was that the guy I repaired it for couldn’t wait to get back on the road and bought a new assembly for something like £240 ($360) .

I would add this tip: When you turn the ignition key for the seat lock it needs only enough to hear it click. The cable mechanism movement is only about 1/4 inch. If the key moves but doesn’t work the latch never try extra force or you may end up with a broken barrel protrusion and maybe heavy expense. Any questions - just ask.
I can't see the pictures.
couls you send them to my email, please?
 
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