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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys,
I'm getting everything I need in order to put new tires on my bike. tires, dyna beads, harbor freight M/C tire changer. Dealership wants $100 plus to do it. tire changer is $86 and bead kit was less than $20. What im looking for now is the mojo blocks for the tire changer so i dont scratch up my rim.
Does anyone know where I can get them? I've looked high and low and cant find them anywhere.
Thanks for your help.
 

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Wrapping the jaws in electrical tape works well, too. If he has a MojoLever available also, it's a good alternative to bar that comes with the HF setup.
 

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$30.00 for mojoblocks?

I guess so, if you are changing tires a lot.

I just bought a set of "rim protectors" for $3.00 they work perfectly fine also. But the electrical tape works just as good also. You could probably get so much electrical tape for 30.00 that you could turn your 13" rim into a 14" rim. :)
 

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The price includes the shipping so it isn't that bad, not in the grand scheme of things. Keep in mind this is a guy in a garage or maybe a small shop not a factory in China.

Granted if it is the kind of thing you use once a year or less then it probably isn't worth it especially considering you also need the tire changer from Harbor Freight for $40 and the motorcycle adapter for another $40 plus the shipping{the quote it gave me was $7 for ground}. BUT it will pay for itself after a couple of tire changes if your dealer charges like mine does!
 

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$30.00 for mojoblocks?

I guess so, if you are changing tires a lot.

I just bought a set of "rim protectors" for $3.00 they work perfectly fine also. But the electrical tape works just as good also. You could probably get so much electrical tape for 30.00 that you could turn your 13" rim into a 14" rim. :)
Yeah, I started with a 14" car tire rim bolted to the top of my work bench, but the HF set-up is so much nicer to work with. I actually use a No-Mar dismount bar and the HF version for mounting tires, with a piece of shampoo bottle zip-tied to the HF bar to prevent scratches.

I've actually been thinking of moving up to a No-Mar set up in the next few years. I normally do 3 - 4 tire changes a year, sometime even more if I'm doing a lot of track days. Since the local dealers charge anywhere from $35 - $100 per tire (off the bike), an better set-up would pay for itself in a few years.

I will say that it's worth it to spend money on good tools to save your body from wear and tear. Especially as you get older and your recovery time gets longer. One bad strain can ruin your riding season, and make the rest of your life 'interesting'.
 

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Have you ever tried zip tie method? Looks very useful. I mean, a practically tool free tire install/removal...

I am waiting on bearings and the muffler connector part and will try it myself probably next week.

$40 to put a tire on a wheel and then $12 to balance it is beyond absurd, which is what the going rate is around here. That works out to be about $600 an hour.
 

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This video must have been directed by Roger Corman! People, learn about "compression of time through editing". The video has 3 minutes of information but is over 15 minutes long. Also turn the dang cell phone! Portrait orientation does not work for video{first minute and a half is that way}. Don't turn your head away from a mic, especially mid sentence. This video could have been voiced over or had lower third subtitles. At times it is hard to hear him. Sorry for the rant but I do video as part of my job and I hate poorly done youtube videos{at least the camera was in focus and the lighting was good}.

However the trick does seem like it would be useful.
 

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Have you ever tried zip tie method? Looks very useful. I mean, a practically tool free tire install/removal...

I am waiting on bearings and the muffler connector part and will try it myself probably next week.

$40 to put a tire on a wheel and then $12 to balance it is beyond absurd, which is what the going rate is around here. That works out to be about $600 an hour.
I have tried the zip-tie method and it didn't work for me. I had to really crank down the zip ties, and still ended up using a ton of lube to get the tire over the rim. A big part of that may be that I'm just used to the 'regular' method of mounting a tire - I've been doing that since I had two tire irons and a car rim.

Changing tires is one way dealers make up other costs - they can charge a minimum of 1 - 2 hours of shop time for something they can normally do in 10 minutes (with a modern tire changer).
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I have gotten most of what I need to change my tires. In time I will get whatever else I may need. The first couple of tire changes will be a learning curve. So far I've spent 86 for tire changer, 20 for beads, and I've had some ideas that might make it easier to change the tires so I have modified the changer. I will learn as I go and see what works and what doesn't.
Certainly this is going to be a money saver.
 

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I've always looked with envy at US motorcycle tire retail prices compared to Europe, usually they have been at least 40% cheaper in USA.

But the mounting costs quoted here just about evens it out, since most smaller shops include mounting and balancing on a wheel you bring in when they charge the suggested retail price.
 

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This video must have been directed by Roger Corman! People, learn about "compression of time through editing". The video has 3 minutes of information but is over 15 minutes long. Also turn the dang cell phone! Portrait orientation does not work for video{first minute and a half is that way}. Don't turn your head away from a mic, especially mid sentence. This video could have been voiced over or had lower third subtitles. At times it is hard to hear him. Sorry for the rant but I do video as part of my job and I hate poorly done youtube videos{at least the camera was in focus and the lighting was good}.

However the trick does seem like it would be useful.
Just for interest (and balance) I have just watched this on a 46 inch TV, via an Apple TV box, which up scaled the video to full screen and the image quality was good. Thought you would be interested as a professional.
 

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I made my own bead breaker. A frame of 2x4 to set the wheel and tire on during disassembly. Bought 2 long tire levers from Harbor Freight. And a HF motorcycle balancer. And a cup of soapy water. That's all ya need.

The wheels are much thicker than you think, so I haven't had a problem prying off the tire. But various items can work as rim protectors. Once you get a little of the tire off, the rest follows easily.

My home- balancing is good so far. No vibrations or wobbles at much over normal cruising speeds. :) And I can install my tires at MY convenience.
 

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I think a the HF motorcycle wheel balancer is good to have if you take your wheels off yourself and have someone mount the tires for you. I have had to rebalance my tires even when the shop said they balanced them. I've even been surprised when I was told they didn't need any weights and when I put them on my wheel balancer they were right.
 

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Having done a few tires and watching that video I see an interesting cut in the video right around 14:12. The point where he uses his tire iron to slip the bead over the rim and then in the next instant you see him slide the tire off the wheel. That zero time interval is where most of my colorful language comes into play. The interval between getting first of the bead over the rim and then getting the next eight or so inches over and the tire slides off.
 

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I just changed my front tire, I used zip tie method this time. Although somewhat skeptical at first, it did make it much easier to dismount and mount the new tire on the rim. I still used small tire irons, rim protectors and some soapy spray. But by far the easiest way I've done at home.

My bead only needed about 5lbs to set too! Awesome. :)

As for balancing the wheel. I just used dynabeads.
 

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An application of concentrated dishwashing soap solution (e.g., Dawn) works wonders. Also, put the tire & wheel assembly in the sun and also warm the new tire. Happy mounting ;)
 
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