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Just filled up my K4-400 at 315 kms (196 miles). It was pretty thirsty.

I'm looking to see if I can get 325 kms (202 miles) to the tank but felt I was pushing it at 315 kms.

I regularly fill at 300 kms. ridden (186 miles).
 

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200 mi at 1/4

I have the burgman 400 2007 and I have rode for about 6 weeks now and been through many tanks of gas. At 200mi my gague is just starting to touch the 1/4 tank. My mpg has been on 65 from the start and the best was 79.9 mpg on a all day foothills parkway/deals gap/cherokee/pigeon forge trip. Know I know it sounds unlikely but i took a picture while on the trip, cause I couldn't believe it. Also if the mpg gague is off like the speedometer then who the heck knows what the true readings are. I use 89 octane and we cruise at about 50mph average
 

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What bike? We ecnourage new members to inculde their ride details either in their profile or in their signature. As you have done neither it's going to make answering you harder...

I got 200 miles easy on the Beemer. I've never got anywehere near 200 miles on either of the Burgers, but the comfortable range for the 650 is greater than the 400.
What kind of MPG do you get with the Beemer? How big is the tank?
 

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Pick your model. Real world data can be found here Suzuki Mileage Reports | Fuelly. I use this site to track my MPG. You can text it your data so real handy.

Far as range goes, if you have a 650 as your reply implies....
You have a 4 gallon tank. The rest is arithmetic and judgement on how your wrist has been on the tank.
In both of my 650s. 2006 & 2007 I've kissed 60 mpg on lazy day backroads run, keeping it 60 and under.
I've also pushed under 40 mpg. Heavy acceleration and stop and go in town.
2013+ gets better MPG at the expense of space.
Of interesting note: The 2007, with the more advanced system, has never been quite as good on MPG as my 2006 (2006 is still mechanical idle, & I believe no 02 sensor, so just mapped).
Tough to say of course since we all evolve as riders, but there is a real world difference of an MPG or two.

Cheers
Tromper
 

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SNAVE could not play nice with others and was made to leave. Good tech head most times.

Some get 40 MPG so 160 miles per tank.
Some get 68 MPG so 272 miles.
 

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I have a 2013 Burgman 650 ABS. On local and country roads with keeping between 35-45 mph most of the time I am getting 61-64 mpg on average. Even when traveling LD at highway speeds I get around 57-59 mpg. I've always read that the tank is a 3.9 gallon capacity. I've often filled up after the tank symbol starts to flash and usually always reset my trip meter "A" when I fill up so I can keep track with how many miles traveled when the fuel gauge shows me what it does. Just Thursday I filled up. The trip meter showed about 180 miles when the tank symbol started to flash. I filled up with 3.01 gallons at 189 miles on that tank. Calculating nearly 62.8 mpg. I'm a conservative rider and always try to go the speed limit, but I also tend to "launch" away when the light turns green leaving others way behind by the time I get up to even only 35 mph. I also tend to take a round about (traffic circles) at somewhere around 10 mph faster than the recommended speed, so when the yellow recommended speed sign says 15 or 25 mph I zip around at somewhere near 25-35 mph. Hey, it's fun to zip around those. Besides, other cages that are in front of me by at least .2 miles going into one of those end up at least .2 to .3 miles behind me coming out of them 😁
But then there are many around here who have no clue how to handle traffic circles and end up stopping before entering to wait for all other traffic on the side roads to clear! Hate it when there is someone in front of me like that in ALL lanes at once! :mad:

Anyway, this mpg is typical for me. BUT, when the temps drop as they will be over the next 2 months, I expect my mpg to drop into the low 50s mpg. And since I do still ride even after the snow flies I'll likely see mileage somewhere below 50 mpg down to something more like 46-48 mpg and possibly lower depending how cold it gets. I'm talking temps down to 15-20 deg F or even down to zero F and below (yep, still riding then and have the gear to still be comfortable at those temps and have learned the additional different skills to do it).
 

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You seriously continue to ride your white scooter when it snows out?
You have a death wish? Even larger white cars are semi camouflaged during snow. You actually continue to ride your scooter when it’s below 0 fahrenheit? Tires are rock hard, Plastic is brittle. Other drivers on the road have limited visibility from half cleared windshields.
Why? I don’t even truly enjoy my snowmobile when it’s colder than 0 degrees F. Besides unnecessarly dangerous, I’m curious why you would want to do that, no other vehicle?
 

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Like I said... there is a special skill set needed to ride in really cold weather. You cannot simply apply the same riding behavior in winter riding as in summer riding or you WILL have issues. I never ride WHILE the snow is falling or right after if I can avoid it. I always wait until the streets are cleared and any remaining snow/ice deposit is melted or evaporated off so only clear dry pavement remains where I ride. Before I retired I'd take the bus to work and pay very close attention to the roads on my route (same as the route I would ride the bike to work) to verify the road is cleared before I would return to riding the bike. Yes, the tires are harder than when temps are warm but "rock hard" would be an exaggeration. I am aware that tire performance is vastly less than when temps are warm so take that into consideration. Plastic is more brittle, so I avoid attempting to remove any panels during cold weather. I've never had any plastic issues while riding in cold since starting to do so with my Gold Wing GL1500 in 2004 (when I finally started getting the right gear for cold riding). If anyone is still cold or uncomfortable due to the cold riding any vehicle, bike or car or snowmobile or whatever, then they don't have the right gear for it. I have the right gear to stay warm and comfortable at any temp I been out in on the bike. I've been out on the bike in temps as low as just under -15F (yeah, minus fifteen F). And I've noticed that larger white cars still stand out in the dirty black and gray snow on the roadsides and on the gray concrete pavement that is on the roads around here. Now light gray cars... those hide really well on these roads. Riding my bike to work I was warmer than anyone else in their cars or on the bus. Especially walking from the parking lot to the building since I didn't remove any gear until inside the foyer. I found it amusing watching others shiver on their walk from their cars... which had just finally warmed up enough to take the chill off after their trip from home. My heated gloves (the only electric heat I've ever used) were warm within a few seconds of turning them on and my gear was put on inside the house and taken off inside my work building so all that heat stayed with me the entire trip.

Since retirement I don't ride in cold weather nearly as much. But I have once in a while. I simply much prefer riding to driving. More comfortable to me and knowing how to ride in cold weather enables me to do so.

Danger? Riding a motorcycle of any kind at any time has danger. Car drivers don't see you when is a hot sunny summer day any more or less than in the dead of winter. It's always a matter of managing risks.
 
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Back in the 60's In the city of Syracuse NY I rode through 2 winters to work and school only if the roads were clear and there was no snow predicted. Now keep in mind in the city speed limits are 30 MPH, couple times I was caught in the snow meh, it happens.

My only advice if you get caught in snow DO NOT use your front brake.
 

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My 650 mpg average per tank full has always been over 50. The instrumentation mode starts blinking around 140 and does a good job of getting your attention. For ride enjoyment, I usually tank up around 180 which leaves me about 30 miles or so before empty hits. It works for me !
 

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My 650 mpg average per tank full has always been over 50. The instrumentation mode starts blinking around 140 and does a good job of getting your attention. For ride enjoyment, I usually tank up around 180 which leaves me about 30 miles or so before empty hits. It works for me !
My best so far is 50 mpg. If I were to run out, I have a 1 gallon can in my right saddle bag. Only because the guys I ride with have 5 gallon tanks.
 

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I have a 2013 650 adopted from a retired naval officer who babied it while he owned it, so it was in amazing shape when I picked it up. It was my first 650 and I'm madly in love with it, even gave up a gf because of it. I go on 'rides to nowhere' where I live in SW Georgia, just hop on and go till I decide to go home. On the backroads I get about 50 mpg and less on the highways where I have to keep my speed up. I would say I actually average about 45 mpg will is low due to the age of the scoot and the fact I am a ahem, large man at 6'3" and 270lbs. I really add to the wind resistance my poor scoot has to tolerate. Due to health reasons I can't do much of my own wrenching but I'm sure good at keeping her clean.
 

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I have a 2013 650 adopted from a retired naval officer who babied it while he owned it, so it was in amazing shape when I picked it up. It was my first 650 and I'm madly in love with it, even gave up a gf because of it. I go on 'rides to nowhere' where I live in SW Georgia, just hop on and go till I decide to go home. On the backroads I get about 50 mpg and less on the highways where I have to keep my speed up. I would say I actually average about 45 mpg will is low due to the age of the scoot and the fact I am a ahem, large man at 6'3" and 270lbs. I really add to the wind resistance my poor scoot has to tolerate. Due to health reasons I can't do much of my own wrenching but I'm sure good at keeping her clean.
yeeah, that's low enough I would be checkin tire pressure , air filter, or maybe you should stop chasin racoons thru the woods or somethin
 

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Either that or stop using Power mode all the time. I read a review of the Burgman 650 where the reviewer ran in Power mode during the entire test ride and he was complaining that the mpg wasn't as much as he was expecting for a large bore scooter. Somewhere around 46-49 mpg for him. Well, DUH!
And, yeah, off road riding will burn more gas. And possibly even using premium fuel. 87 Octane is all that is called for in this bike and in many vehicles designed for regular fuels using premium can result in lower mpg.
 
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