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Discussion Starter #1
About how much mileage can you rack up before any major problems with the bike?
I am using this bike to commute on 100mile return trips.
 

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No one has reached that point yet. If you take care of the 650 (perform all service on time, etc.), there's no reason I can see that it shouldn't give you over 100k miles.
 

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You absolutely cannot do any harm to the AN650 by twisting on the grip in 'Auto' or 'Power' mode. I suspect you might be able to overrev in 'Manual' mode, but who'd want to. As near as I can tell, both the AN650 and the AN400 are the two most bulletproof bikes ever made.

As Bill said, perform the oil changes/regular services, watch the oil level, and don't run it out of gas, and you'll have no worries for probably a lifetime of riding.

I miss mine. :(

Steve

Gear up!
 

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How many miles can you rack up on a new car without major problems? Most new car buyers don't know - or care. Unless their luck is terrifically bad, they'll sell or trade that car long before anything major goes wrong. It is pretty much the same with a new Japanese motorcycle or scooter although you do have to do routine maintenance more frequently.

I've owned many Japanese motorcycles and I've never had a major problem. I've always maintained them by the book. The most miles I put on one was 66,000 ('95 Kawasaki Concours). It still had lots of trouble free miles left in it I'm sure. I've talked to Goldwing owners who had close to 200,000 miles on their "Wing" and were debating whether to trade it or not. I don't think that the scooters are built to any lesser standards.

Anything mechanical can fail. But do the maintenance when it comes due, and don't lose any sleep at night.
 

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wasions said:
-snip- I suspect you might be able to overrev in 'Manual' mode, but who'd want to. -snip-
I'd say "No". Almost all cycle engines have electronic rev limiters these days. I'd be very surprised if the AN650 did not. But I'm not going to dash outside and try it. I agree with the "who would want to" part. :wink:
 

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There is a rev limiter on the 650. you cant over-rev it in manual mode.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thank you for all your help…..much appreciated.
One of our concerns was the transmission, never having owned or driven an automatic.
 

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As I posted in this thread, the CVT has been used in snowmobiles and ATVs for years.
 

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Are snomobile and ATV transmissions the rubber-belt variety, or do they use the steel link-belt variety? The original question applied to the 650. I didn't think the steel link-belt variety had been used on anything except cars so far, but maybe I'm wrong.
 

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Old Biker said:
About how much mileage can you rack up before any major problems with the bike?
I am using this bike to commute on 100mile return trips.
Hi, Old Biker. :hello2:

I have 10,090 miles on my 650, have had it over 100MPH several times, done a bit of "drag racing" with it, many 300+ mile days, one 3,000+ mile tour in 6 riding days.

Not a bit of trouble, and only now getting close to having to replace my original tires. (Some riders have got far less on their rear tires; riding style and inflation being major factors). I've never had to add oil or coolant between services.

Unless you're unlucky enough to have a bad bearing or something (there have been a few cases, but only a few), the Burgman 650 is really one tough machine.
 

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frugality said:
Are snomobile and ATV transmissions the rubber-belt variety, or do they use the steel link-belt variety? The original question applied to the 650. I didn't think the steel link-belt variety had been used on anything except cars so far, but maybe I'm wrong.
Snowmobile belts are the rubber variety. Not sure about ATV's.
And boy has this drivetrain improved in the past couple decades.
 

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frugality said:
The original question applied to the 650.
Which uses the steel belt and is more durable.
 

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billmeek said:
Which uses the steel belt and is more durable.
The belt itself is probably more durable. But the 400's (and snomobile and ATV's, it seems) CVT is mechanical. The 650's SECVT is electronically controlled, and Old Biker's question was:

Old Biker said:
About how much mileage can you rack up before any major problems with the bike?
The answer really should have been, "Experience here on the board seems to show that the SECVT is pretty reliable, but no one has put more than 25k miles on their scooter yet." The SECVT is a new critter. There are CVT's like this in some cars, but it's new to Suzuki and new to motorcycles. So it remains to be seen how durable they really are. If memory serves, there are some small drive motors and plastic gears that control the varying of the pulleys, so it remains to be seen how well these and the electronics that operate them will hold up in the long run.

Personally, if someone asked me which transmission is more reliable, I'd say the 400's, because it's been tried and tested on many scooters, ATV's, and snomobiles, and it's purely mechanical in operation. The 650's is much more complex with more potential places to go wrong. But if reliablility is defined as belt life, then the 650 wins.
 

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frugality said:
...The 650's [transmission] is much more complex with more potential places to go wrong. ...
Is it more complex? How many counterweights, bearings, gears, etc. in a variator-actuated CVT have been replaced by a simple electric motor in the SECVT?

It looks like a pretty simple and reliable mechanism to me.

If someone were to ask me which is more reliable I'd have to say there is no way to know, because the SECVT hasn't been around long enough build any kind of accurate reliability data.
 
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