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It's great, I hope ya got good use of yours. I rarely used mine.
 

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2011 Burgman 650
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Well folks. I did it. Pulled the trigger on a McCruise cruise control. Expensive but for my travels, its going to be money well spent. $1297 AU equates to $938 US with shipping. I’ll let you know how installation goes.

Dana
Received the McCruise yesterday morning. Very fast shipping considering it came from Australia and had to go through customs. Won’t have time to start the install for a few weeks.
 

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2011 Burgman 650
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
While I have tupperware off and am installing the McCruise I want to add a Fuze Block.
Looking for recommendations for a fuze block to be mounted in place of the tool kit.
Thanks

Dana
 

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LeDude has a good one drawn up.

If adding relays here is a 6 relay and 6 fuse box. $18 from Amazon

 
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While I have tupperware off and am installing the McCruise I want to add a Fuze Block.
Looking for recommendations for a fuze block to be mounted in place of the tool kit.
Thanks

Dana
These are the ones I listed in an article I wrote nine years ago (www.billanddot.com/adding-rivco-led-mirrors.html), and some may not be valid now. They range from fancy (programmable) to basic:


It's hard to go wrong with any of these, especially the basic ones. I have an Eastern Beaver PC-8 in my current (on-the-market) '08 Exec, and I've never found any fault with products I've ordered from Eastern Beaver. I have also used some more basic DIY-type of blocks before that. My buddy had a BMW dealership install a fuse block for him on his RT some years back, and the dealer's tech chose a Centech. And the Fuzeblocks block has also been around for years, is in widespread use, and presumably perfected.

If you want utmost simplicity, and don't care about relays, for instance, but just don't want to glom up battery terminals, I've used the Powerlet Termin-8 (www.powerlet.com/product/termin8-easier-than-fuseblock/409) on one bike, and heartily recommend it. But that's not really a fuse block, so back to your question.

More importantly, to my mind, is where you put the block. I've always decided to put a block in the area that I will be adding most electrical farkles. This has meant, for me, putting the block up front, where I'll add voltmeters, extra lights, maybe a horn, and so forth. To me, this simplifies (and shortens) wire runs, and just makes life easier. Yep, this also entails making one (1) run of a pair of beefy wires -- say, 10-gauge, hot-side-fused -- from wherever the battery is to the fuse box. To me, that's a worthwhile trade-off, even if the battery is far from the block.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
LeDude has a good one drawn up.

If adding relays here is a 6 relay and 6 fuse box. $18 from Amazon

Thanks Dave.
 

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I never use my cruise control on the Burgman, the wife, who quit riding with me a few years ago said I was too easily distracted. Although I deny this I realize she could be right so not using it is a measure I take to control risks. On the same commute I use the cruise on the truck all the time.

The travel logs I've seen of AU I would use one for sure. I'm sure you'll enjoy yours.
 

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I added an MC Cruise to my then-new '07 Exec, i.e., back in 2007, that first year, and loved it. That version used a vacuum canister, which, if I understand the situation correctly, has been replaced with a servo-motor gizmo. I also had a real cruise on my '12 Victory bagger, from the factory.

I suppose how much anyone values cruise depends on a few factors. Chief among them for me is that I have a daughter who lives c. 840 miles away (a day or two of long superslab rides), and that traffic is often not very heavy on some of those stretches. Also, it depends on how much you prefer to keep a given speed within an MPH or two, as opposed to a wider variance with a throttle lock. As I say, I really enjoyed having cruise on at least a couple of bikes.
 

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2011 Burgman 650
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Won’t use it in the city (Indy), but I like to take trips. I’ve been all over Indiana and Michigan. Want to head west, hit route 66 as far as I can take it. The onto the great west. Planning on a month. I believe the cc will come in very handy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
These are the ones I listed in an article I wrote nine years ago (www.billanddot.com/adding-rivco-led-mirrors.html), and some may not be valid now. They range from fancy (programmable) to basic:


It's hard to go wrong with any of these, especially the basic ones. I have an Eastern Beaver PC-8 in my current (on-the-market) '08 Exec, and I've never found any fault with products I've ordered from Eastern Beaver. I have also used some more basic DIY-type of blocks before that. My buddy had a BMW dealership install a fuse block for him on his RT some years back, and the dealer's tech chose a Centech. And the Fuzeblocks block has also been around for years, is in widespread use, and presumably perfected.

If you want utmost simplicity, and don't care about relays, for instance, but just don't want to glom up battery terminals, I've used the Powerlet Termin-8 (www.powerlet.com/product/termin8-easier-than-fuseblock/409) on one bike, and heartily recommend it. But that's not really a fuse block, so back to your question.

More importantly, to my mind, is where you put the block. I've always decided to put a block in the area that I will be adding most electrical farkles. This has meant, for me, putting the block up front, where I'll add voltmeters, extra lights, maybe a horn, and so forth. To me, this simplifies (and shortens) wire runs, and just makes life easier. Yep, this also entails making one (1) run of a pair of beefy wires -- say, 10-gauge, hot-side-fused -- from wherever the battery is to the fuse box. To me, that's a worthwhile trade-off, even if the battery is far from the block.
Thanks for all the info. Very helpful.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Starting the install of the McCruise. Have read the directions twice so it is time. Removed all required tupperware. Pulling the battery compartment tomorrow (not required). Then removing 2mm of metal from the rear side of the handlebar clamps (for the CIU.cable interface unit bracket) and from the lower part of the left brake lever and brake reservoir clamp ( for the cruise controller). Will then mount the electric throttle servo. This requires drilling one large and four small holes in the right hand lower glove box.(the one that locks).
Pics to follow.
 

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Starting the install of the McCruise. Have read the directions twice so it is time. Removed all required tupperware. Pulling the battery compartment tomorrow (not required). Then removing 2mm of metal from the rear side of the handlebar clamps (for the CIU.cable interface unit bracket) and from the lower part of the left brake lever and brake reservoir clamp ( for the cruise controller). Will then mount the electric throttle servo. This requires drilling one large and four small holes in the right hand lower glove box.(the one that locks).
Pics to follow.
Lotsa pics will help future installers here, so you'll indeed be doing the community a good deed, providing a good service. Congrats on getting the cruise (and, some have said to me, over the years, regarding such spending: it only hurts once).

Some comments:
  • That's a very clean and tidy workspace you have there. Congrats on that, too.
  • I've removed the entire seat that way on a 650 or two. Gets it completely out of the way, but as I recall is a real PITA to put back (just to forewarn you).
  • Live your life the way you want to, of course ... but if it were my bike, I'd get rid of those ugly glove-box warning labels, followed by some goop-off.
Good luck with the project!
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Lotsa pics will help future installers here, so you'll indeed be doing the community a good deed, providing a good service. Congrats on getting the cruise (and, some have said to me, over the years, regarding such spending: it only hurts once).

Some comments:
  • That's a very clean and tidy workspace you have there. Congrats on that, too.
  • I've removed the entire seat that way on a 650 or two. Gets it completely out of the way, but as I recall is a real PITA to put back (just to forewarn you).
  • Live your life the way you want to, of course ... but if it were my bike, I'd get rid of those ugly glove-box warning labels, followed by some goop-off.
Good luck with the project!
HaHaHa. Never noticed them. I agree. They are history.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Moving at a slow steady pace. Took a boatload of tupperware off, then drilled a 1” hole in the right side if the glove box. This is for the electro servo and associated wires.

Next I removed the left brake clamp, removed 2mm of metal from the bottom half of the clamp, then mounted the cruise controller.

I then removed the left handlebar mount and removed 2mm of metal. Put it back on and tomorrow I’ll do the other one. A 2 mm bracket that holds the cable interface unit mounts on the brackets.

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