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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello everyone, I was just wondering if people could shoot and share their tips on maximizing miles to the gallon. I weigh only 135 pounds yet, I could never get to 60 mpg ever. Most of my driving is in city so I get about 46 in town and 55 on the highway. I have heard of people getting over 60 miles per gallon of gas on their trips and I was just wondering how they do it? I am a very light rider and I would love to know. Also, I have made a chart showing exactly how much mpg I am getting. All the ones below 50 mpg are in city driving most of the time, and the ones over 50 mpg are mostly highway trips.

Gas mileage

Test 1- 53.3 mpg

Test 2 – 42.8 mpg

Test 3 - 57 mpg

Test 4- 57.1 mpg

Test 5- 46.7 mpg

Test 6- 46 mpg

Test 7- 45.7

Test 8- 52 mpg

Test 9-53 mpg

As you can see, 57.1 MPG was the maximum highest MPG that I have held on record, and it was done mostly on highways. The record low 42.8 MPG was done in all city riding and no highway. How do you guys get great gas mileage?

Have made sure my tire pressure is at the proper level and I am fairly easy with the Burgman while riding, however sometimes I do accelerate and stop rapidly. My Burgman 400 is a 2004 model with 9975 miles on it currently
 

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I routinely get 62 mpg, driving back and forth to work on rural highways. I weigh 210 pounds. I don't know why you would get less. My bike is a 2005 400.
 

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I regularly get 62 to 63 mpg on my 06 400 on highway rides and I weigh 110 lbs more than you do. However I keep my rpms to 6300 max. Depending on the age of the belt that nets me 61 to 65 mph (measured on my GPS not the speedo). Newer belt gets the higher speed and the speed drops as the belt wears out.
 

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I'm well over 200 lbs and average around 53 city and 58 highway. I can get over 60 in the twisties and going light on the freeway. Your milage seems low, those are 650 numbers. Might want to get the bike checked out.
 

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First off, you will be 10% high on mpg due to the speedo reading higher. I average 50mpg 'actual' doing interstate, running 70mpg with a bigger screen 266...I can get 60 if I slow down a bit, I run regular ethanol.
 

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Is there an explanation why speed drops as the belt wears? My belt has 14 thousand on it.
is it stock or kevlar? I've heard kevlar ones reduce your RPMs when worn out.
 

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First off, you will be 10% high on mpg due to the speedo reading higher. I average 50mpg 'actual' doing interstate, running 70mpg with a bigger screen 266...I can get 60 if I slow down a bit, I run regular ethanol.
Actually, although the speedo is off 10%, but the odometer is more accurate. Per my gps, it is only off 4% positive. However, GPSs are known not to be too accurate when it comes to odometer readings either. Personally, I think the bike's meter is about as accurate as you're gonna get.
 

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Is there an explanation why speed drops as the belt wears? My belt has 14 thousand on it.
Yes it's pretty simple really. As the belt wears it gets narrower. That means it does not go as far up on the primary pulley so you get a lower gear ratio and thus lower speed for a given rpm. That is why the maintenance schedule calls for measuring the belt width and replacing it if it gets below 0.82 inch wide.
 

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B4 I sold my 06 Burgman 400 I routinely got 63 mpg.... And I weigh way more than anyone who as posted so fer. The most I got was 72 tooling around on backroads.... The least I got was 52 riding hard on the four lane and over mountains.

Sirkitrider
 

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When I was commuting on rural roads with reasonable traffic, traveling at 50-55mph for long stretches in a train of cars, I routinely got 65-68mpg. Now I am commuting on interstate and urban roads, heavy traffic, lots of lights, more stop than go and I get 57-59 mpg.

Prevailing wind direction has a significant impact as does drafting. Used to be, I had a big mpg hit when riding in the rain. Then I got a second air filter so I always have a clean one on the shelf and that characteristic disappeared.
 

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Over the past two years, my 400 is averaging 54.1 mpg. (Out of 48 fill-ups, my best tankful was 61mpg, my worst was 47.1) I'd estimate that 75% of this mileage is urban, short trip, stop & go. This, and high speed freeway riding kill mpg.

Treat yourself to a Sunday ride on country backroads with long stretches of cruising in the 50-60 mph range. I bet you'll hit 60 mpg. As for the guys who consistently average in the mid 60's, I too can only scratch my head.
 

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I took my first longish ride (170 mi.) yesterday on my new-to-me 400. The bike tells me I got 64.5 mpg. This was all back roads doing, usually, 55-60 mph. I weigh 240, so I would think you should be doing better.

I felt that the best mileage obtained was when I was going a steady speed, no matter what the speed was. There were a few times I went 65 steady and the mpg meter kept inching up.

John
 

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I average 65 mpg over many tanks. Can maintain 80 mpg on the flat, cruising, in warm weather.
First, take off gently.
Get to cruising speed. Easy on the throttle.
What kills MPG is stopping (the kinetic energy is reduced to wasted heat) and restarting (getting your mass up to speed again).
So, theoretically, DON'T STOP.

The 400 seems to get best MPG at 60 to 70 MPH. This is non-intuitive. The engine seems to come "on the cam" about 5000 RPM. Above that speed, wind effects take over ( I think to the 4th power of speed).

BTW I weigh about 180 clad in boots etc. The bike weighs about 477. Whether you weigh 140 or 180 makes little difference.

Oh yes, in the southern winters, my mpg drops to low 60's, but it's back up to the 70's when it's warm out again. Temperature is a big factor, I am working on a warm air intake for the winter.
 

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I took my first longish ride (170 mi.) yesterday on my new-to-me 400. The bike tells me I got 64.5 mpg. This was all back roads doing, usually, 55-60 mph. I weigh 240, so I would think you should be doing better.

I felt that the best mileage obtained was when I was going a steady speed, no matter what the speed was. There were a few times I went 65 steady and the mpg meter kept inching up.

John
The bike lies. My 08 400 read 3-5 MPH higher than the actual MPG. My 09 650 shows about 2 MPH higher than actual (however, it only reads to 50 MPG and it frequently gets a little better than that on backroads and twisties).
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I heard the heavier Dr. Pulley Sliders (19g+) increase a little MPG. Anyone have experience with this?
 

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To the OP. If you ride a lot of town and city then the air filter will clog much more quickly. I have to replace mine every 7500miles. Way ahead of the Suzuki service recommendation. But cities are dirty air places and this seriously affects the mpg's you can get. But of course, everyone is right about city sapping your fuel economy anyway. So recommend checking the air filter for cleanliness and generally make sure she is serviced properly, including the spark plug. It all adds up to make a big difference overall.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I think I've found out why I am getting lower average MPG than most. I have a giant milk crate on the back of my Burgman 400 for extra storage and I think it has something to do with wind resistance. I also have a big ass Givi windshield
 

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I heard the heavier Dr. Pulley Sliders (19g+) increase a little MPG. Anyone have experience with this?
Yeah, I have 19g sliders in mine to reduce the engine RPM when cruising at freeway speed which is 75 mph actual here. I made the 250 mile trip home from the dealership with my used 2011 Burgman 400 at times reaching 90 mph indicated to keep up with traffic. I didn't have a GPS with me, so I just kept up with traffic. My engine speed was sometimes close to 8,000 RPM and the bike used about 200 ml of oil on the trip home. I attribute that to the high engine speed. The temperature on that trip was 38°F, the elevation was about 1,200 ft MSL and it was raining lightly and I managed to get 38 mpg for the trip. That was the worst ever fuel economy I observed.

After installing the 19g sliders, I now cruise on the freeway at 75 mph actual and my engine speed is something like 6,500 RPM. I switched to Shell T6 5w40 synthetic, the bike no longer uses oil and my fuel economy improved perhaps 5 mpg. I attribute most of that increase to the sliders getting the engine revs down. Temperature and altitude also seem to be large factors in a fuel injected engine. The warmer the weather and the higher the altitude the better. At high speed, you'll also improve your fuel economy by "tucking in" when riding to get as much of your body out of the airstream as possible. I now ride with the upper part of my Givi AF266 removed.

I do get better fuel economy on the back roads driving 10-15 mph slower than on the freeway, but the difference isn't as much as you would think it would be. I like it because it's a much more relaxed riding experience. You can see my average fuel economy in the Fuelly.com tag in my signature. I'm 5'11" and 225 lbs in my socked feet.
 
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