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I have just had my 4000 mile maintenance on my 2008 Burgman, while the bike was just under 6800 miles. Nothing serious was noted, the dealer did replace the plug and air cleaner, and performed an oil change. I know very little about the pre-load shock adjustment. I asked one of the dealer mechanics and they told me that this "pre-load" shock adjustment is for the tension from where the bike sits currently til the time you sit on the bike - how low to the ground you go is dependent on the setting. Mine is still set to 3 as it was when I bought it. Is this correct? My concern for changing the setting is twofold - A) I have to ride minimally 1 - 1/2 miles of semi-rough dirt road to get the a main paved road and B) Michigan paved roads for the most part are full of asphalt filled potholes. Will lowering the setting to 2 or 1 help the ride so that I don't "feel" the bumps as bad or is this not what the setting is for?
 

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Well, Mines is set to #6 When you change the Number to lower setting most of your Bikes weight is on the Rear with Higher Numbers ,With Lower Numbers the weight Shifts to the front Wheel your best bet is to Dump those Brigstone Tires if your's have them there very Ruff and Bumpy tires, you feel just about everything with those tires from Cracks to Bumps to Potholes + Filled potholes,

But if you Switch the Number #1 or 2 you will Notice a Difference in Speed Drop off. Get up and go! Do to the Transmission being Raised to High.

#1 - 2 Softer But bike will bounce up and down to much. #5 - 7 Much Stiffer Less Bouncing up and down. and front wheel looses Lots of weight there for a Chance of the Front wheel Slipping Alot on Cornering,Turns.

Elliott,
 

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Get the preload up to "Max" it loads up the front wheel, better stability, sharper seering. My preload is at max with rear tyre at max recomended pressure and mines very stable flat out.

Geoff.
 

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Matter of fact i might just Do that to macamxthe1st, Since i dumped the Stock exhaust Wieght, there should be some improvement there?

Elliott,
 

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I went the opposite direction on the preload setting. :lol: I set mine at 1, the lowest number. I commute on I-5 in Seattle, and the concrete pavement joints get out of place from all the seismic activity we have. Setting it to the lowest setting seemed to soften the ride ...somewhat...but not a tremendous amount. I don't find myself going out of control, nor the suspension bouncing up and down. If it did, I'd replace the shock absorber, since at any setting, it is supposed to control that movement.

You may want to experiment with it some, since the amount of change will depend on your weight. IMHO, go for the softest setting to allow the suspension to absorb the shock, and not transmit it directly to the frame and you like a buckboard wagon.

Here are some pictures showing where the index mark is to adjust the preload. While the wrench is turned from below, the index mark is viewed from the side. It took me the longest time to find that mark. :roll:


Closeup of the index mark location.


The index mark location from a little farther out to get a better perspective of where it is located.


The index mark location slightly closer.

Chris
 

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The preload adjustment primarily affects rear ride height. Less preload also means some softening of the ride over small bumps, because the INITIAL spring force is lowered, making it easier for the rear wheel to start moving. Once it's moving the spring rate is pretty much the same, regardless, and there's little effect on big bumps.

The way pros set it on race bikes is to measure "sag". How far does the rear suspension move when the rider gets on. Race bikes are set at maybe 25-30mm, street sport bikes at 30-35. Touring bikes a bit more. More here. It's race oriented, but racers are the main people who adjust this by something other than trial and error, and gut reaction.

http://www.gostar-racing.com/club/motor ... %20Preload

As you raise the rear, the handling quickens a bit, because the front fork is slightly more vertical, and vice versa. If you find the scooter too eager to turn, you want to reduce preload. If it's too stable, too reluctant to turn, you can quicken the steering by increasing preload.
 

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A flash Light is needed to see where it's at... hope it's Correct...

Elliott,
 

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Thanks Chris for that reading insight. I been reading mine from the bottom all this time. I nearly pulled my shoulder out of place trying to get this thing to go farther, based on the number on the bottom, when in all actuality, it was already on the lowest setting. Wow, that could have been ugly had I went further.
 
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