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Discussion Starter #1
I own a 2011 Burgman 650 Exec, and have a question about throttle response while coming to a stop, or moving along in slow speed traffic where just a small amount of throttle is needed.

I've had this bike for a year now, and have only 2200 miles on her. I'm not complaining about this, but it's pretty hard for me to control the bike's quick response to small throttle inputs from me.

I like that I don't need to use my brakes much in normal slowing down situations, but when needing to add a small amount of throttle to adjust my speed, I feel like I did when learning to drive the stick-driven Chevy when I was 16...the the bike just lurches forward or brakes with minimal throttle application.

This B650Exec is the first scooter I've owned, and I've been trying to get used to the differences between a clutch lever controlled engagement of the final drive on the cruiser-style bikes I've had up until now, and the tranny and final drive on my Burgman.

I'm pretty sure many of your 650 owners here know what I'm talking about, and I was wondering if there's anything I can do or have done to make my Burgman a little less "jumpy", or do I just keep "getting used" to it.

Thanks.

--Andy
 

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The 650's tranny is unlike any in "scooterdom", wonderful in many ways, but the slow speed issue is a bit of a problem.

First and foremost, make sure you don't have it in "Power" mode. That only exacerbates the situation. Sorry, don't mean to state the obvious, but I've know owners that didn't even know what the "Power" button did, let alone use it. If its on, turn it off for normal riding.

You could use the rear brake as kind of a reverse clutch, giving just a little brake as you give it gas on slow maneuvers, just enough to regulate your speed. But your best best is to learn great throttle control. "Getting used" to it as you described. Hope this helps.
 

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I know exactly what you mean, Andy. It's always an adventure getting in and out of my place because I have to ride over rough dirt and need to drag the rear brake while applying power. It took some getting used to, but I get a lot of practice since it happens EVERY time I either come home or leave.

Out on the road it's a bit easier. I just have to remember to feather the throttle the same way I used to feather the clutch on bikes which have one. I've discovered that applying just a little power as I'm slowing down works pretty well. It goes into "neutral" once it drops below 10mph and that's when I finally let go of the throttle altogether.

I'm going to mention one more technique, but I'm going to include the caveat that I am NOT comfortable with using it in traffic yet - but I've only had my Burg since Halloween. If you put it into manual mode, you can step the gearing down yourself. It helps, but I'm more comfortable just leaving it in drive.

Bottom line is that it comes easier with practice. But there are still times when I'd appreciate a clutch. On the other hand, the Burg is so perfect for me in every other way, that I just don't worry about it and work on improving my technique with the new clutchless system.
 

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OP if you weren't new to the bike I'd recommend a palm throttle to make fine control easier but it can make it worse.

Bottom line the advice so far as been good....I call it slow speed "manners" and it takes some adjusting - tho really no more than with a clutch and lower gears.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I'm always riding with the selector in "Drive" mode, and like others have suggested, I'm still working on "getting used" to it.

One of my friends is into radio controlled flying, and he's invited me to the grassy flying field which has tire ruts concealed in deep grass, and is accessible by a dirt/gravel road (also with some ruts in it). Trying to ride through this stuff with the Burgman is a little "touchy", and is the worst environment to ride in.

Most of my riding is on pavement, and I've been learning to get a feel for the drive characteristics of the bike for the first 2200 miles.

Like I mentioned before, I'm not complaining...the 650's a great ride for me. I just was wondering if anything could be done to calm down the sensitive throttle response.

Thanks again for your replies.

--Andy
 

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I understand Suz tweaked the 2013 to reduce the engine braking to be closer to the Honda ( ie non existent )
 

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My Speedo-Healer transmission mod (the CVT-controller is fed with an 8% higher than actual speed signal) works like the opposite of "Power mode" and significantly reduces engine braking and jerky throttle response.
 

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Like others have said the more you ride it the better you will get use to it. I don't have a lot of slow riding. Turning onto my dirt road that then turns 90 degrees is were I find my most jerking riding.
 

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I have Kuryakyn ISO Grips on mine that makes the grip much larger. I have found that that makes a difference. I rode my friend's 650 today with the stock grips and noticed a difference.
 

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If you'd like to see how much difference thicker grips make without spending the sixty bucks, go to your local bicycle dealer and get some cork tape. Take one of the rolls and cut it in half. That'll be about enough for a single grip. Do them both so they're balanced and see if it makes a difference for you. You might actually prefer the cork - it's easily adjustable to fit your precise needs and it costs less than ten bucks.
 

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OP, not meaning to make you worry but I was experimenting with the calibration of the throttle position sensor (TPS) a few weeks ago. I tweaked it to the lean-mixture side of its calibration (the center LCD segment was still on) and then went for a test ride. I had learned how to manage very smoothly the "normal" engine braking behavior but the new calibration point on the TPS made the bike essentially un-rideable. The engine braking was much more severe than the normal engine braking and it occurred before the throttle was completely closed.

Seems to me that the 3-LCD calibration procedure has lots of "slop" because the bike went from well-behaved to a bucking bronco while the TPS was still "properly" calibrated. So the other side of this experiment would be to move the TPS very slightly toward the rich-mixture end while the center LCD is still on to see if the ride improved.

If this all makes no sense to you, then please ignore it and listen to the other posters ;-)
 

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I have a 2012 650 Executive and maybe the bikes are not all set up identically from the factory, but on my bike, slow riding is very easy and smooth. I can easily ride at a walking pace with no issues at all. There is no hint of any jerky throttle response.
 

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Once again, gripping the handle grips too tight gives you a tired aching feeling in your hands and arms, but also can cause throttle response to become difficult to control. Loosen up some on the grips, does wonders for control of the scooter in tight places as well as on the road. I was always told that you can feel a 100,000 of an inch with your finger tips, so use your fingers and brain to control you scooter, makes sense to me and it works.

John
 

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throttle control

Howdy All,
I had a little problem getting use to the unpredictable and sometimes touchy throttle on both my Burgman 650 and Honda GL1800 Goldwing. In my case I found there was too much cable slack, so I fiddled with the adjustments on the cable jacket, loosen the lock nut and turn the adjuster out to make the cable jacket longer, this removes excess slack, there should be about 1/4" of slack. In other words twist the throttle a bit to make a chanege in when the throttle responds to increase engine speed. I like it better with less slack, you might like it better with more slack.
Later, Jim
 
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