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Discussion Starter #1
I'm looking seriously at the AN650s here in Los Angeles but before I plonk down the dosh on a new one I'd REALLY like to ride one for a few miles.

Are there any members in the area who'd be interested in swapping bikes for a bit (I have a Kawasaki ZX9R) while we buzz around the Santa Monica Mountains or elsewhere? I am in Orange County.

Tnx,
Carl
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks!

Yes I have and they are all very reluctant to offer that unless I am ready with cash in hand. Besides, that would only be a quick jaunt around the block which isn't sufficient for a decent impression.

Getting 10miles or more around town and up on the freeway would be ideal to get some feel for it, or so I imagine. All the while someone is near me on my bike.

I've even checked with my local group of bikerscum^H^H^Henthusiasts at http://www.labiker.com and nobody has one there but a discussion about it brought me to ask in here. I hope that someone here might be up for the idea. :)

Carl
 

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While your idea has merit and I hope you find someone I wonder if even a 10 or 20 mile ride will tell you much.
A new bike just takes longer then that to get to know it. I would think your not ready right now.
I say that because I believe most of the members here bought with out a ride -dealer or otherwise -
You have an idea what you want ---you like what you see --- the spec's seem OK -- you read a forum like this--
But in the end you have to take a chance, just like getting out of bed in the mornning. :)
That's my 21/2 cents worth.
 

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There's a poster here named migz, I believe, from OC and I have a friend in Long Beach with a 400, but I suspect Randy may be correct.



Peace.
 

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Most dealers don't allow test rides. The ones that do usually allow them for long time regular customers. It's understandable that dealers want you to plunk down some cash first. The dealer doesn't know the degree of skill most customers posess.
Likewise with a individual owner. Truth be told, I think you will have a difficult time finding someone who will part with their beloved Burgie. Especially to a stranger -nothing personal but thats reality.
As mentioned earlier, most people here bought without a test ride as I did. Though I did a lot of research, lots of reading on this site and many others. I was then confident that I wanted a Burgman. Everything turned out great! I love the machine. Prior to buying my Burgman here is what I concluded from this site alone:
-Most people who previously owned motorcycles have not looked back since buying a Burgman.

-Just about everyone here loves their Burgie. (Hence the possible difficulty of finding somone willing to relinquish theirs for a test ride.)

-Problems with the Burgman are very few and minor. Seems like people with major problems can be counted on one hand. Nevertheless, major problems can occur on anything mass produced.

-The most common "problem" is the dieseling noise at idle only which isn't a problem at all. As someone mentioned elsewhere on this site, you won't be happy with any motorcycle if this noise really bothers you. Most bikes have some type of idiosyncracy. Mine does it. I'm thinking of getting the fix done. If it makes it quieter - GREAT! If not, que sera sera - what ever will be will be.

-The machine is supported by a lot of very friendly, helpful and resourceful people on this site.

-The Burgman while not perfect (nothing really is), is a fantastic machine. Part of the fun is doing mods to make it suit your needs and making it fit your personality.

Ultimately it's your decision. Do a lot of research, ask questions. I believe the more you learn, the more you will be wanting to take the plunge and get one. Otherwise if you still have a lot of doubts, you are not ready or the Burgman is simply not for you.
I will say this about the Burgman, acquaintances, curious motorcyclists, and people in cars when the light changes realize very quickly that this scooter is no rinkydink toy. The responses to the machine are universally favorable.
 

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SilverBurgie,

I agree with everything you said.

The other problem with the "let me borrow yours & you can ride mine" plan is that it is frankly a disaster in the making. Scooter reflexes and motorcycle reflexes are different. There is the left lever brake vs left lever clutch, automatic vs manual transmission, unfamiliar supplemental transmission mode switches on the left handlebar pod of the AN650 - and the scooter is much quicker steering than the motorcycle. According to the AMA, a fairly high percentage of motorcycle accidents occur during the first few miles on an unfamiliar machine. So a motorcyclist on a super scooter, accompanied by a scooter rider on a motorcycle, both unfamiliar with the machines they are riding, going off on a 10 mile ride in traffic to "get a feel for it" - is inviting trouble. It's a risk that I would not take.
 

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I would.

Unfortuantely, I'm way over here.

While what Paul says might be true for some, like those who've only ridden scooters, I think for the most part one adapts rather quickly.

Paul, did you ever grab a handful of rear brake thinking to downshift your scoot? I didn't think so. For me, and I suspect for most, going from shift to shiftless is pretty much a no brainer.
 

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wasions said:
Paul, did you ever grab a handful of rear brake thinking to downshift your scoot?
Yes. But only during the initial week or two of ownership. Did it in the dealer parking lot when riding it away for the first time.

My other trick is to start my V-Strom and twist the throttle (in neutral) fully expecting the bike to take off... Usually happens after I've been riding the scooter exclusively for a few weeks.

I stand by what I said above, although everyone is certainly welcome to their individual opinion.
 

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wasions said:
...did you ever grab a handful of rear brake thinking to downshift your scoot?...
For the first few days I had my 650, I kept going for a right foot brake that wasn't there. It's precisely because riding can be a "no brainer" that this occurs; we ride without consciously thinking about every detail of what we are doing, but when switching between "modes" we get some carryover that can cause problems.
 

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Test Ride

God, you guys make me really appreciate my local dealer. I went in unsure and he handed me keys to a demo 650. It was 10AM. He said to be back by 3PM, and make sure I did some freeway time before I brought it back. Just for a plug, that's BELL'S SUZUKI, Lexington, KY, talk to Mitch. Also, the bike was VERY reasonably priced. I paid something like 6200, plus tax and all that crap.

Franklin
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Lots of good opinions and I know and appreciate why people aren't jumping the gun to let people borrow the scooter/bike. I am pretty nervous about that stuff myself although several of my friends have ridden my bikes.

I was sort of hoping that someone would say "sure, I'm here in LA and come ride mine" but I don't expect it.

I've ridden a lot since I was 8 years old (20 years now) on scooters, mopeds, motorcycles and back/forth atwixt all models. The only time I really felt a little weird was on a Lambretta with the 3speed handlebar shifter. :)

Meanwhile, I am still here reading along and wanting.

We'll see what happens, I might be able to convince a dealer sort of nearby to let me out on a little trip.

Thanks for the replies,
Carl
 
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