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Just purchased a used 2008 Burgman 400 and was interested in knowing how many miles some owners have on them and what are the secrets to making them last. Thanks.
 

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Your scoot is neither a race bike nor an off road machine - don't drive it like it is.
All machines last longer with regular preventative maintenance. Your scoot is a machine.
Don't let it sit out in the weather. A little rain won't hurt it but it'll last longer if garaged and cared for.

Common sense goes a long way and your purchase price is just the start of the expenses you'll incur if you take care of your scooter.
 

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Mine is going on 37k & 8 years old and she still runs beautifully. Certainly not a high mileage bike, but by all indications, she'll last another eight years and 37k, if not much more.

The engine is flawless, its a rather stout little mill. All other systems are built for the long haul as well. Just change fluids, oil & air filters, & spark plug. I'm not fastidious about it, except oil.

The only weak link, IF you can call it that, is the tranny. You do need to replace the belt every 20k, deglaze the clutch every now and again, and perhaps a new clutch at 30-40k. All this is dependent on how you ride her. One up, with a light pilot, less so, two up, or with heavy loads, more so.

Two recommendations, though. Always blip the throttle to 4500 rpm when you take off from a stop. This engages the clutch quickly and prevents premature wear.

Second, and this is from personal observations and preference, keep the mechanics stock. I read and hear of so many people trying to get a little more performance to suit their tastes. Some like them, some don't. Many go back to stock. The 400 is a very "balanced" bike stock. IN GENERAL, When you play with one thing, something else gets affected. I think the engineers at Suzuki did a great job with the bike and choose not second guess their work. IMHO, you will get the longest wear by keeping it just so.

(For all those who will write in saying I'm wrong about this mod or another, note that I said this is my personal preference derived from my own observations. I've not said mods are bad, just that it is a tremendous bike as is.)

Good luck. I think you will find it a Fantastic ride.
 

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Well said Liamjs... As far as the question how long will it last? I assume you mean the engine? Because everything has a lifespan, the body will last forever, but the clutch won't.

I'd imagine the engine (could)probably last 150,000 miles, before she would need to be rebuilt, going with very regular oil changes etc but that might be stretching it, they say a 100,000 mile engine!
 

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Keep the fluids clean and fresh and ride her every day; she'll keep you happy for many long years. This is actually true of every motorcycle, not just the 400.
 

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Fully agree with liamjs. Here in the Uk we have several high mileage Burgman 400's that I'm aware of. In my local area there is a 2006 with over 80k miles on the clock. The only things replaced on it have been the clutch and variator aside from normal service parts such as pads, belt, filters etc. There is also a 2009 400cc version that has 88k on the clock. I've seen it. Again a new variator has been fitted and a clutch but nothing else apart from normal consumables. Both bikes run fine, use no oil and are mechanically quiet. I'm pretty sure these engines can go 130,000 to 150,000 miles with very little effort. I've now had a couple of the engines apart to do various things for customers and they are built really well. Incidentally, the two engines I had apart were both due to customers mistreating the engines. One hadn't had an oil change for 12k miles!! The other, the valves had never been checked from new at anytime and both exhaust valves had gone tight and burned the head and valves. Shame, it had just 25k on the clock and cost a bomb to fix.
 

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The other, the valves had never been checked from new at anytime and both exhaust valves had gone tight and burned the head and valves. Shame, it had just 25k on the clock and cost a bomb to fix.
Quantum, was this a pre or post 07 bike? I've not checked my valves in 20k and I'm starting to feel guilty again. :rolleyes:
 

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Gosh, those seats must be soft to be closing the gap at 25k....I dare say quantum ode chap, on average how many do you actually adjust per check on the 400?

We all just wondering if we have to pull the rocker cover at the recommended 15k?

Ex southwest UK boy!
 

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Yes, I am concerned by Quantum's post as well. I've proven to myself that suzuki's maintenance recommendations can be a tad stringent, the bike is more than capable of operating safely outside them. But the valve adjustments seemed a bit of a mystery. I've read some who never check them and many who have only to find them not a tiniest bit off.

I know the engine is well built. So it begs the question, realistically, how often do the valves actually need adjustment, and thus checked. I'd be interested in opinions on the subject. I've not a clue.
 

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I just hate the hassle of stripping all the plastic and disconnect all the wire and removing stuff to get to the valves...
 

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Hi Liam, yes the burned out valves and head were on a 2009 400cc unit. The owner had never ever checked the valves and had undertaken all maintenance himself from new. NEVER ever miss checking the valves is my advice. It's so easy to do and takes no more time than changing a spark plug. No big dismantling to do either. If you find a valve that needs adjustment then get someone to do it for you if you cannot or don't want to do it yourself. Mostly, you won't need to do anything to the valve clearances as mostly you'll find them ok. But around one in ten bikes from new needs some adjustment at the first major service of valves. This is for sure due to several factors. These include how the bike has been run in. How it's ridden. What oil and quality of oil is used and importantly...how accurately the clearances were set at the factory. Although errors at the factory on this sort of thing are much less likely these days, it still happens from time to time. I've seen it on both bikes and cars in the past but most cars now use hydraulic valve lifters so alleviating the problem. Majority of bikes do not use hydraulic valve lifters. Since switching my ride to a Burgman 400 I have a small click of 5 riders who bring their bikes to me for service. None of them has less than 30k on the clock and only two of them has needed valve clearance adjustment at the 29k mark. They will probably not need adjustment for many many more miles now. As the norm, it seems these bikes either need valve adjustment early at 14,500, or after very large mileages have been covered. Incidentally, there is some anecdotal evidence that the Motoman run in technique makes it much more likely the valves will need early adjustment. Probably due to the excess heat and some compressive wear to valves, seats etc (thats even though they are hardened).

Always check the valves clearances at the time specified and the bike will run and run.
 
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