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Well, like so many others on the Forum, I locked my only Suzuki key in the seat trunk. Had to call a few locksmiths that could make a new key for my 650. It was expensive ($145), but not as expensive as it would have been to tow to my faovrite bike shop and have them do it. Learned a couple of lessons here:

1. Keep the key code tag in a safe place, away from the key itself.
2. Always have a spare. Should have had that made months ago!

For those of you who may be in the Jacksonville, FL area, call Instant Keys at 904-722-1111. They're terrific!
 

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Tim, now go and do the emergency trunk lock mod. :D
 
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Well 64 and sunny here. Dont tell the California guys, we want them to think it rains here all the time. I get the Cascade down slope winds that get compressed and heat up so sometimes its warmer in Auburn than Seattle..... I think its about 55 in Seattle. Remember Perry Como's song "The Bluest sky you ever seen, in Seattle" Here comes the Brides. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7oRVwciEfbY .
 

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Now would be a good time to remind people that you can always open the trunk by removing the engine cover (phillips screw driver), locate the trunk release cable running along the top right hand side under the plastic and above the engine, grab it (on the jacket) with a pair of pliers and pull up and forward and the trunk should pop open. When I had to do it I spent about five dollars at Walmart for a cheap screw driver and cheap pliers (happened to be at Walmart when I locked the key in). A lot cheaper and easier than getting a locksmith.
 
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Some folks can get the the seat latch with a screw driver. I like the idea of a hidden lanyard to open the seat.

Another thought is have you asked at the Suzuki dealer how much that key number you want will cost. It is very enlightening.
 

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I had a key made at a local locksmith. I cut the head off and using glue attached a knob from a clothes dryer to the key. I keep it in the fuel cap which is covered by my GIVI bags and if I need a spare key, I have it there. I also have the latch mod which was easy to make with fishing leader and clear tubing. I locked my key in the trunk, once. I was home though and the spare was in the house.
 

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I keep it in the fuel cap which is covered by my GIVI bags and if I need a spare key, I have it there.

That's a neat idea. I like that one. :thumbup:
 

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Many solutions seem more complicated that necessary and attaching to the latch is not clear. So, here's my description of a 10 minute solution with no drilling and no exposed wire.

I got 9 inch stainless fishing leaders at WalMart. Then I removed the two socket screws that hold the latch in place. This allows the latch to be flipped over to where you can get at the split lug that the cable attaches to. I removed the retaining pin for the cable (clamping forceps are the ideal tool so you don't drop the clip inside of the bodywork. I lifted the cable end out of the split lug. Then I slipped the leader clip over the lug and reinstalled the cable and retaining clip. I used and extra leader as a "fish wire" and ran the leader under the plastic and out the hole where the rubber bumper for the seat protrudes through the bodywork. Then, I disconnected the leader used as a fish wire and attached a 1 inch key ring. Reinstalled the latch. I lifted the sealing gasket for the seat and tucked the wire in there enough to hold the ring from slipping off the flat surface beside the gasket. Nothing visible to temp thieves.

To release, I just slide my finger under the edge of the seat and pull out the key ring and give a little pull. Here's a picture

[attachment=0:1r00qfxl]IMG_0300.JPG[/attachment:1r00qfxl] [attachment=1:1r00qfxl]IMG_0295.JPG[/attachment:1r00qfxl]
 

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My solution is very simple. Do not take the key out of the ignition switch until the seat is closed. I always look at the ignition to make sure before I close the seat.

Vic
 

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Or just make sure you are holding the key in your hand before you push down on the seat to lock it.

Bill

Enjoy the ride...
 

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Am I missing something. I'm new to the Burgman but frankly, I can't imagine a scenario where I'd put the key in the seat trunk to begin with. Not trying to be a smarta$$ here.

chas
 

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My garage is a 20' container locked with a substantial padlock.

I always close the padlock without the key, and AFTERWARDS pat my pocket to make sure I have the key.

The same goes for closing my Burgman's seat.

I'm afraid it's just a question of WHEN I will lock my keys in either the container or the under-seat area.
 

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cgiles said:
Am I missing something. I'm new to the Burgman but frankly, I can't imagine a scenario where I'd put the key in the seat trunk to begin with. Not trying to be a smarta$$ here.

chas
Let me give you a common scenario...

You shut off the bike, put down the kickstand, climb off the bike, pop the trunk with the key, turn the handle bars to the left, lock the ignition and remove the key, lock the security key cover, without thinking slip the key into your jacket pocket while you continue to open the trunk, pull off your gloves and toss them into the trunk, pull off your helmet and place it into the trunk, finally remove your jacket fold it and place it in the trunk, lock the trunk and realize either imediately or at some point later that the key is still in your jacket pocket...DOH!!! :oops: Most commonly happens to newbie Burgman riders :D and I'll admit to doing it twice in the first month ...Double DOH!!! :oops: :oops:

I was also the first to post about using the fishing leader and key ring out the side under the seat, like the idea of running out under the tupper ware and out that bumper hole.


Simple fix; as some have suggested is to train yourself to leave the key in the ignition until everything else is done then as the last thing remove it and lock the key cover and then slip it into your pocket. :thumbup:
 

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Lots of cool solutions to the key-in-the-trunk problem. I did it once, in a McDonalds parking lot across the street from my work. After searching everything internet for the best way to open the seat, and arming myself with a variety of tools, I simply pulled one side of the seat away from the tupperware, slipped my hand inside the trunk, and grabbed my keys, which, fortunately, were pretty easy to get to. If they were tucked in the back, or maybe way up front, it probably wouldn't have worked. But it took me all of 5 seconds to do! Needless to say, I pay more attention before I shut the seat now!
:cheers:
 

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I would guess the guy that wears all of the riding gear all of the time and lives in a warm area of the world is more likely to lock the key in the trunk.

My VIP top box locks when the lid is closed so if the seat does not get me maybe the top box will. :lol:

One of the first mods I did to my new 400 was rig up a lanyard to release the seat. I also keep an extra key in a tool bag and if the key is not to be found lift the seat and I got another one.

At my age I can walk into a room and think why am I here? The lanyard makes life easier. :thumbup:
 

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SteveE said:
Let me give you a common scenario...

You shut off the bike, put down the kickstand, climb off the bike, pop the trunk with the key, turn the handle bars to the left, lock the ignition and remove the key, lock the security key cover, without thinking slip the key into your jacket pocket while you continue to open the trunk, pull off your gloves and toss them into the trunk, pull off your helmet and place it into the trunk, finally remove your jacket fold it and place it in the trunk, lock the trunk and realize either imediately or at some point later that the key is still in your jacket pocket...DOH!!!

Simple fix; as some have suggested is to train yourself to leave the key in the ignition until everything else is done ....
Ok, I can see that. Hadn't thought of that; but with the "Simple fix", now I'm going to be totally paranoid about walking away and leaving the key in the ignition :( . NEW "simple fix"; don't get old :p .

chas
 

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I got old. Now I have two blanks made. One stays at home, and one lives relatively hidden on the bike. Thankfully, I live in an area where my bike getting stolen never enters my mind, so no worries about the spare key there. The blanks won't open the ignition cover (I never, ever use it anyway), but will open the underseat so I can always get to my OEM key if it gets locked inside.
 
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