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Discussion Starter #1
My wife and I go camping alot and would like to take the burgman along.
I'm thinking the weight of the scooter and the height of my truck (Dodge 2500 4x4) could pose a problem. Does anyone haul their bike with them?
Trailering is out because we tow a travel trailer. Another option would be some sort of device off of the camper bumper...but a bouncing burgman can't be good.
Thanks for any ideas,
Jim
 

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The Burgman has low ground clearance. The 4X4 is higher off the ground and will create a steeper angle. I think this will be an issue you will have to work around. The Burgie weighs 525 and will not be a lot of fun to muscle around. It will be very easy to bottom out putting it in the back of a P/U.
 

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I bought some ramp "ends" at True Value that were designed to bolt to the end of a 2x10 or 2x12 for a ramp. I've got some 8' long 2x10s in the garage, and am planning on making an 8' ramp from one and my ends. My truck is an '86 Nissan Hardbody, and not nearly as high as yours is. I back up to my sloped driveway until my rear wheels are at the low spot and that puts the tailgate level much closer to the ground. I'd suggest you look for a similar low spot to get your truck into so the bed will be closer to the ground. Then do the math to figure out what angle the ramp would have to be for the burgman to not high-center, then extend that angle to the ground to see how long a ramp you'll need.

Of course getting the bike on your truck is only half the problem. You've got to be able to take your ramp with you, and find a similar low spot where you can get it off when you want to ride it.

Sounds like a tough one to solve. I don't suppose you've got space in the trailer for the bike?
 

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I have had some misfortunes using wood loading ramps. Slick, very slick. You also have to consider how you are going to get up and down in the back of the truck with the bike. Are you going to ride it or walk beside it? You wouldn't have to ask very many people at all to find some who have had loading misfortunes similar to mine. This is not a place to try to save money. Do it right. The first tumble you avoid will more than pay for the plastic you tear up if you make a mistake. Those ramps with the curved tops in the pictures in the link provided are designed to eliminate or reduce bottoming out.
 

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Paul Barnard said:
I have had some misfortunes using wood loading ramps. Slick, very slick. You also have to consider how you are going to get up and down in the back of the truck with the bike. Are you going to ride it or walk beside it?
I used a 6' wood ramp for several years getting my Honda 250 Elite scooter in and out of my Nissan Pickup. It was 6' because that's how long the bed was, and I always took it with the bike. I'd made my own metal "hook" to keep the ramp on the bed. It was a 2x10, and about 9.5" wide. It was a rough timber, and never seemed slippery when wet, but then I didn't usually (maybe never) put the bike in the truck when it was raining. I never had a mishap riding that scooter up the ramp, but doing it wasn't for the chicken-hearted. All it took to get it off was to keep the wheel straight and let it roll down backwards. Being a short ramp left little time to wander off. I gave that ramp to the kid that bought that scooter. We used it to put it up in the back of her friends' tall pickup.

That said, Get a ramp engineered for the purpose. You'll be happier, safer, and have someone you can sue if it fails. I trust myself, having worked with wood for 25 years, to make my ramp work for me.

Dave B.
 

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Rubble said:
One quick Google is all it takes to find the answer:

Just One Googled Site

Try it! It's fun! :D
I bought the big boy ramp from this site long before my Bike came in. I still haven't developed the courage to ride it up in my truck. Maybe soon I'll just do it to get it over with. I think it would be great to take the burger along camping.
 

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wingsofsteel.

Using that ramp should be a piece of cake. It's wide enough and has enough traction to slowly ride up with you feet down for balance and security. You might have to use the brakes and throttle at the same time time keep your speed/momentum in balance. Due to the curved design I doubt if ground clearance will be an issue. As far as unloading, stay off the scooter and just walk it down. You don't want to lose balance while sitting on it and have the machine land on top of you. Stand off to the side and walk the scooter down keeping your hands on the brakes. The front wheel may lock up but that is not much of a concern as most of the weight will be transfered to the rear wheel and therefore be the main stopping power. It's usually advised to have one person loading/unloading only. The second person tends to take too much balance/control away from the person holding on to the handle bars.
Take it easy to begin with, start by just putting the front wheel up the ramp to get a feel for it. Go up and back down like that a few times. Relax and take your time. Practice. After a few times up and down it will be easy, well a least whole lot easier! If you are not comfortable with it due to the steep angle (I know those Dodges are high!) see if you can find an incline that you can back the truck up to and practice until you gain some confidence.

Best of luck.
 

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Thanks Rubble,
I'll let you know how it goes. I've ridden my ATV up the ramp; just haven't been able to figure the best approach for the bike. Your perception is correct, my biggest concern was backing it down. Your suggestions are a help for us all. Thanks, buddy.
Perry R.
 

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Any possibilty of attaching a carrier to the rear bumper or frame of the trailer? My Dad had a 40' Pace Arrow and just built a drive up ramp along the rear of it. Place the ramp, drive up on the platform (from the side, it made loading way easier, especially when the boat was already hitched up behind), slide the ramp into the carrier under the platform, and off you go! He was carrying a 450 Honda ATV 4x4 that had to weigh what the Big Burger weighs!

Just a thought...
 

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I carried my bike back from the dealership (a 40 mile one way ride) on the back of my Ford Ranger. There is nothing special about the Ranger and I presume it is a 1/4 ton pickup truck with factory suspension. I had no problem with the clearance or the handling of the truck. Once home, we already had "drive up" ramps (with the hump, which is all important), and we used bungee cords to close the gap between the two. Then, just backed the bike off the truck with a person on each side.

One thing that helped... I backed the truck up to a small mound so that the tailgate and the "ground" were much on the same level. That made it much easier to control the descent speed of the bike without worrying about the need for brakes. Also, we figured earth, not concrete, would be easier on the bike should we have dropped it.

Joe
 

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I load my 400 about every other day. Loaded an SV650 for 3 years up the same ramp. The ramp had to be changed (less angle) to keep the scoot from high centering. What ever ramp you get or build make sure it has plenty of traction for tires and feet. Make sure the ramp can't dislodge when power from the rear wheel is added. When checking for clearence the first time invite a couple of big friends over. You may want to have someone push , assisting the engine,( at center, not for balance) the first few times to save clutch wear. Make sure, everytime, that there are no tie downs or anything else to get under your feet. Remember when the front wheel starts up the ramp the stand over height increases and this may be a factor if you don't have long legs. Don't use the front brake coming down the ramp. The front wheel may (will) skid causing loss of control. Strapping it in is another long post.

Oh yea, will this put you over the Gross Combined Weight Rating for the truck when pulling the trailer. I am the weight police on RV forums.

Rick
 

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Tandem Cyclist said:
I
Oh yea, will this put you over the Gross Combined Weight Rating for the truck when pulling the trailer. I am the weight police on RV forums.

Rick
Well, when I bought my AN400, I built a ramp using two 8 foot 2X12's with a piece of 3/8" plywood holding them together. On one end I put some aluminum pieces I bought from Auto Zone that allow the ramp top to be fush with the tailgate. The guy I bought the scoot from drove it up the ramp into my truck, and we tied it down with ratcheting straps.

Did I overload the truck? Well, I drive a Ford F450 that is used to tow a 37 foot fifth wheel - I think I had a few pounds left on the GVWR! I'm also a Charter member of the IBWP (International Brotherhood of Weight Police)! :D
 
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