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I've read and watched a couple of reviews of the Burgman 400 which stated that they came with linked brakes.

Have I over-looked this in my 2013 owner's manual?....or was this a feature on earlier Burgmans?

Surely they were not confusing linked brakes with ABS brakes?

My 2014 Forza had linked brakes, so I know what they are.

Stig
 

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I think the pre 2007 had the linked brakes, but for the newer ones they don't.
Linked brakes in some cases can cause the front wheel to skid, some of the systems have a pressure valve that will engage the front wheel when the brake lever is pulled hard but others are not. Even though if there was sand at your corner you should be worry and brake erlier because of that liked brake. (Not all new inventions are perfect)
 

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This is an analysis of the pre-'07 400's "linked" brakes, from a post I made in this thread from mid-2012:

cliffyk said:
On the pre-'07 400 this was accomplished by having the rear master cylinder feed what Suzuki calls a Delay Valve, which I found to be a spring loaded spool valve. The valve permits initial pressure to pass to the rear caliper only, and then as the pressure builds and overcome's the valve's spring the spool shifts, and pressure is applied to both the rear and the front caliper's "linked" piston.

The front caliper has two pistons, isolated hydraulically, with the topmost piston connected to the front master cylinder and the bottom pressurised by the rear master via the delay valve. The front's top and bottom pads are identical, however the bottom ("linked") piston is much smaller diameter than the top "front brake" piston--22.6 mm vs. 34.0 mm, only 44% of the dedicated front piston's area.

At the rear the hydraulically activated piston is 25.3 mm, so once both the front and rear linked pistons are pressurised the front clamping force is 80% of the rear's. However as the front rotor has a 230 mm working diameter versus the back's 150 mm, this works out to about a +22% front bias. Along with the front and rear tire diameter differences (the front is 3% larger) this makes the front/rear braking ratio approximately 55/45. With application of the front delayed by the spring-loaded valve.

I am 100% neutral as to the linked braking system's performance, as I do not see that it has any profound positive or negative characteristics--it just is what it is...
Most of the time it is barely, if at all, noticeable; you have to grab a pretty good handful of rear brake to feel any front wheel braking at all--in fact quite a bit more than I would normally use...

The thread is a good read as there is a lot of "back and forth" discussion of the pros and cons of linked brakes...
 
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