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Discussion Starter #1
Coming out of the parking garage a truck in front of me slammed on his brakes. I had to pull up short while in a turn and laid my 650 on the right side. **** this thing is heavy and awkward to lift. Only a couple of small scratches that you really cant see unless your looking hard. But **** this thing is heavy and awkward to lift. :roll:
 

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Yes, this is very heavy to lift 500+ pounds.

Last week at work (1st time bringing it there), went to park, got off and it tipped to the right. I could not lift it back up. Luckily a construction worker came over and assisted me to lift it back up.

But these are built well, there was no damage on mine, and it seems you didn't get much damage on the bike.
 

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jjacobs said:
...**** this thing is heavy and awkward to lift. :roll:
Ahh, the 2nd reason I traded my 10 month old 650 in february
for a 400.

Did your 650's Tip Over switch automatically shut the engine off when it
went over or did you have to use the kill switch?
 

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My friend Steve (sss on this forum) forgot to set his brake on a slight grade a few days ago and it rolled off the kickstand. Only damage was a broken turn signal lens.

He said it was surprisingly easy to pick up because, as he put it, the weight of the engine and tranny is way down low. I asked if he righted it with his back to the bike and he said no, he just grabbed the handle bars and picked it up. He's not a big guy, about 5'8" and 160 lbs. However, he's been riding motorcycles for decades and probably knows some tricks.
 

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You didn't say, but I hope you didn't hurt yourself when this happened!
I think we usually we go into a semi-panic/angry mode when we drop a bike. Things like, "darn, I could have been hurt", "wonder what kind of damage was done to the bike", "did anyone I know see me", go through our heads. It's hard to think straight while your pride and joy sits on it side. I've dropped a bike a couple of times. :wink: (retired motorcycle cop, thankfully it only happened in training, and not on the street)
One thing to try to remember is to use the bike to help as much as it can in picking itself up. On the Burgman, set the parking brake before trying to pick it up. That way it isn't rolling one way or the other while you stand it up. Also, try to use your legs, not your back. The best method is shown on this site.
http://www.ibmwr.org/otech/pickup.html
It might sound kind of strange, but I have actually practiced picking my bikes up in my drive way. I lay an old blanket down on the concrete so not to scratch anything. Then lay it over, and then pick it up. I do it on both the right and left side of the bike. I figure it's gonna' happen sooner or latter, so I might as well have some practice at it first.
Anyway, I hope you didn't get hurt when this happened. Scratches on a bike are easier to fix.
 

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Another good site, with photos, is pinkribbonrides.com

I used those instructions to right our 400 after a parking lot spill.

Bryna
 

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Stormseed, I routinely leg-press between 350 and 500 pounds (usually pyramiding up, with 15-20 reps per set). So that's probably another reason I ain't normal. :wink:

To me, the Burgie 400 felt very easy and light. I would say it would be like squat-lifting 90 pounds. If your gym has a hack-squat machine--where you push up from it, with the weight on your shoulders--or a squat-press--lying on back, pushing forward--these might be helpful to see how you'd do. If those can be done with hip replacements. Can't help you there...but The Tall One says the way my L knee creaks, I'll be due for a knee replacement at some point. :cry:

Cheers,

Bryna
 

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Stormsteed,

If you watch the little movie, it appears that she is lifting it using a series of short backward steps, rather than lifting it with her legs in one big effort. I'll bet that you could do that just fine. Another reason for the little short steps I think, is that you want to lift the machine slowly so that you can stop when it is vertical enough to kick the side stand down. Otherwise, it could topple over on the other side, with you on top of it...
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks for the tips

Thanks for all the input, I didn't hurt myself picking it up. But the folks wanting to get out of the garage behind me were less than patient. And now that I see these other examples, if this happens again, it will be a lot easier to pick up.
Thanks again
 

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Another good, effort less yet red faced way is to grab the opposite side of the bike from the handle bar faced down stand on the up side and rock your weight on it.
It will come up and easily.

Recap Grab handle bar that is down on the ground. Stand on peg or footboard.
Pull in opposite direction and it will rise.

not always pretty but there is something to be said to be able to ride away from a drop/wreck.


tat-2
aka
Ed
 

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JJ,
Situational Awareness is important to safety.
This is not to say that SA can be called upon like a water
bottle to take periodic sips from.
There are bad days when demands on the rider exceed
margins and choices when reacting to changes with their own conditions.

I'd like to suggest that you get ready for your next ride a little differently
than you're used to. It's one thing to say that you're tired when you ride
a bicycle or even a car. They are more forgiving in some situations that
otherwise catch a mc rider off guard. You may be aware of these differences
already but with a new bike and a new rider things can get worse (as you've
described).
As you become more experienced, I think that you'll become more aware
of when you're not ready to ride than perhaps when you are ready to ride.
Subtlety becomes a major factor when you do your self-evaluation before
a ride on your Burgy. With that experience, you're taking subtlety
with you and your senses start to see the worlds edges.

If things don't feel right, walk around your Burgman and look it over
with the owners book. Do that even when you do feel like you can
conquer the road. Confidence and knowledge is harder to build when things are in motion.
After studying the bike, there can become a stronger bond of sorts where a rider
connects a little better with everything.

Your Burgman owners manual discusses in simple terms about feeling
right before riding.
 

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Invincsum said:
Stormseed, I routinely leg-press between 350 and 500 pounds (usually pyramiding up, with 15-20 reps per set). So that's probably another reason I ain't normal. :wink:

To me, the Burgie 400 felt very easy and light. I would say it would be like squat-lifting 90 pounds. If your gym has a hack-squat machine--where you push up from it, with the weight on your shoulders--or a squat-press--lying on back, pushing forward--these might be helpful to see how you'd do. If those can be done with hip replacements. Can't help you there...but The Tall One says the way my L knee creaks, I'll be due for a knee replacement at some point. :cry:

Cheers,

Bryna
Hi Bryna,
Leg pressing 500 lbs is impressive BUT if you're doing 15-20 reps per set, ya ain't using enough weight. I suggest you do no more than 12 reps per set and increase the weight so you can barely make that last rep. Once you can do the 12 reps for 2-3 sets it’s time to increase the weight again, drop back to 8 reps, and work your way back up to 12 ad infinitum. Here's a link to a site devoted to women's weight training you might find helpful.
http://www.stumptuous.com/weights.html
 
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