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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone have experience with the Mini Mate Kompact Kamp?

I'm thinking of a long, on-going tour on my Burgman 650, possibly several months. West from Florida across the bottom of the U.S. in the winter months, back across the top of the country during summer.

Before the virus, my plan was to use airbnb rooms with a network of friends and family along the trail. Camping is not as comfortable or convenient for cooking, showering, etc. but it keeps me outdoors and away from viral hot spots.

The Kompact Kamp with hitch is a bit less than 300 lbs. Can a 650 tow that comfortably?


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I used to own one. My absolute favorite mc pop-up camper. Very easy to tow and very quick and easy to set up or put away. Plenty of storage that is all under the bed and mostly untouched after setup so it's not in the way while staying at camp. It was perfect for me since I camp and ride solo. I have known couples to camp in it as well. When I bought my CTX1300 6 years ago I decided not to install a hitch and sold the Mini-Mate to a couple who intended to use it for Sturgis. These days I kind of wish I still had it.
One of my first few times going to mc rallies (Davis Motorcycle Rally in New Hampton, Iowa) 15-16 years ago I visited with a couple of Burgman 650 riders from Washington state who were towing Mini-Mate campers. They said the Burgman has no problem towing them. I agree. I towed mine with a ST1100 but could have easily towed it with the Burgman. As with all mc campers starting and stopping takes longer and farther so you have to plan ahead more. But once up to speed it's barely noticeable.

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
"I used to own one."

Fantastic info. Thanks for sharing it.

I really like the simplicity and (relative) low cost. Love all the storage under the bed. This is most intriguing. I learned recently of several apps that feature free or low cost sites to camp on, some that are specifically motorcycle friendly ... Hipcamp and Harvest Host are two.

Another option I will explore is a trailer for the bike, a Stinger or Kendon single-rail that folds. With trunk space in the car, I could carry a larger, nicer tent. I like this option because with the car, I'm not at the mercy of the weather. If it's pouring, I can keep rolling in comfort. I suspect it would make the Burgman more enjoyable, too, because the only time I'm riding it is at desinations for fun.

Kind of digging the idea of a Kerouac, "On the Road" adventure, minus the drugs, alcohol and youth ;o).
 

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And if you have your National Parks Senior Pass you can camp for half price and free access into the any National Park or Federal recreational area. I like camping at Army Corps of Engineers campgrounds. Well kept, easy to find (just look for a large lake or reservoir with a dam), and low prices... especially with my Senior Pass. Last one I stayed at cost me $5/night. Actually it was $10/night but was riding with another camper who shared the cost with me. Could set up both tents on one camp site. I'm 65 now.
 

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I have been entrigued with the idea of long distance MC camping. But I am reluctant to pull a 300+(once loaded) trailer with a Burgman. Sounds like an early death of the CVT to me. Then I thought, well I can always pull it with my truck but realistically, I don't like to travel a lot alone, and my friends and family think camping is staying at a Motel 6. So the thought is not dead, but is still percolating on the back burner. Someone had asked a question on here about riders pulling trailers with their Burgmans, and some people knew of people who had done it, but no recent riders with first hand knowledge responded.

I have decided that MC manufacturers don't/won't make the bike for me (800 to 1100cc, shaft driven with a DCT with storage, comfort and LCG of a Burgman) that I would consider going cross country pulling a trailer.

For good research on what it's like to MC travel with a Mini Mate trailer, search on Youtube for "Old guy on a bike". He lives in Newfoundland and he owns and modified the trailer, but he pulls it with a ST1300. He can be a bit on the boring side but lots of good ideas and knowledge, so just skip over the slow, cooking breakfast and life pondering parts.
 

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rjs987,

Can you tell us anything about the Crazy Drugs and Wild Women ? I just turned 60 and want to get me some of dat 🕺 before I get to old 👨‍🦼
 

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rjs987,

Can you tell us anything about the Crazy Drugs and Wild Women ? I just turned 60 and want to get me some of dat 🕺 before I get to old 👨‍🦼
If you speak of Sturgis I cannot answer about that place/event. Never been and don't ever intend to go. The couple I sold my camper to intended to use it for that event and others.
 

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Another option I will explore is a trailer for the bike, a Stinger or Kendon single-rail that folds. With trunk space in the car, I could carry a larger, nicer tent. I like this option because with the car, I'm not at the mercy of the weather. If it's pouring, I can keep rolling in comfort. I suspect it would make the Burgman more enjoyable, too, because the only time I'm riding it is at desinations for fun.
This is what I have been doing, but you can do it for a lot less money than a Stinger or Kendon. I've got a folding trailer from Northern Tool (fairly close to the one they sell at Harbor Freight) which has worked out well. It was about $400, and I added a plywood deck, folding front wheel jack, and scooter chock, and upgraded the tires so I could exceed 55 MPH. Has been from Cincinnati to Florida three times, Arkansas, and Connecticut, and it's going to Northern Michigan in a couple of weeks. I wouldn't hesitate to take it cross country.
 

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I don't like riding in the cage pulling my bike. I very much like riding the bike TO the destination... where-ever that may be. Actually I don't think in terms of any particular destination but rather the journey along the way. It's the ride that I enjoy much more than arriving any particular place. It's what's more important to me, so I enjoy riding my Burgman to get there and usually choose routes that avoid the fastest or shortest path, like Interstate Highways and such, and choose roads off the beaten path. At least somewhat. It's the same going someplace 5 hours away or 5 minutes away. I generally turn it into a much longer ride and enjoy it more.

Two types of travelers. Those who are into the destination. And those who are into the journey to get there. I'm the latter. Others may be the former. And that's OK. We are all different. My wife likes arriving at a destination and sometimes wishes the journey to get there was instant. She'd be a candidate for travel using a Star Trek Transporter to arrive anywhere instantly.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
"Two types of travelers. Those who are into the destination. And those who are into the journey to get there."

Not sure it's that black and white. I have feet in both camps. For an open-ended trip like I'm considering, I will enjoy the destination AND the journey. I just think it's smart to create options and variety.

Options ... if I wake up in a tent in a monsoon rain predicted to fall all day, I would hate the journey of riding the Burgman in the rain like a cat hates being tossed in a full bathtub (I loathe riding in the rain, and I don't loathe many things). In that case, I hop in the car and drive away from the storm.

Variety ... if I'm riding six hours to a destination on the Burgman, when I arrive, doing more riding to explore, get food, see some sights, is the last thing I want to do. I'd be tired of sitting on the bike; I've had enough of the roar and wind; my butt is sore. On the other hand, if I drove six hours today to explore the deep forests of North Florida, towing the Burgman with my Prius, riding the bike when I arrive is EXACTLY what I want to do.

I agree riding the bike is way more enjoyable than towing it. With an open timetable and good weather, I'd pick the bike ten times out of ten. But facing iffy weather and 600 miles across the interminable, empty plains of West Texas, that's a different story.
 

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I think I'm right there with you DelrayBeacher. Pretty much all the same kind of thinking. If I were riding to a location and pulling that cool camper, and time were not of the essence, and I saw yonder storm a coming, I think I would prefer to find a hotel, pull a cover over the Burgman, and camp out at the hotel until the rain were over. I hope I'm building my future in order to be able to do such a thing.

And the same thing when I got to my destination. I would enjoy finding just the right camp spot, and situating the camper and getting it all set up. But at that point, I'm ready to lay down and rest until my hiney feels like sitting on the Burgman seat again. Might be a day or 3. Would love to have that flexibility.
 

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Over on some other forums, I think it is advrider, they discuss stealth camping. Oh boy does that sound found. More on that shortly. But combining stealth camping and these little campers would be such great fun. Not sure I'd ever go home.

Stealth camping (I'm no expert) is camping in places for free, out of sight, but potentially right up under the nose of the general public. But also includes leaving no trace behind. For example, it could be setting up behind a power (somewhat large) substation at dusk, and loading up and leaving at the crack of dawn. Or just far enough inside a bit of woods to hide your bike and tent. Some just throw a hammock up between trees and sleep in that. But I wouldn't be able to sleep in a banana shape on my back all night. I've heard stories of a rider or two camping out, hidden behind a baseball field's tower. Like a little league field. But of course, mature camping. Not doing anything destructive. If one could find a place and sneak and set up one of these little campers hidden somewhere, that would be so fun, sneaking around like that. But it would be fun to be in a campground too. Stealth camping is done from dual sport motorcycles. But with enough creativity and/or time, I would imagine a sneaky place could be found on a Burgman towing one of those little gems.
 

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DelrayBeacher take a look at the Leesure Lite campers, that's what I pull with my Burgman. In my opinion it is an easier set up than the Kompact Kamp.I have the smaller "cycle" model.
I have long toyed with the idea of a small camper for the Burgman. I used to pull a trailer with a Yamaha Venture many years ago. I probably pulled it a few thousand miles total but enough to know you do have to alter your riding a bit. Stopping was never an issue and I rode carefully. Based in what I experienced with the Yamaha, I think the 650 Burgman would do fine as long as you kept the weight within reason. I don't think there would be long term ramifications to the CVT but even if it didn't shorten the life somewhat, it will still last a long time I suspect. I had about given up on the idea of getting a camper. Maybe it is time to relook at that idea.
 

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Blacktruck - Keep us posted on any moves you make. I'm an ole softie. I just know when my sons graduate from college, if they move to different areas, it's going to make me sad. Yet, going from one to the other on a Burgman or a Goldwing with a little camper like that sounds like fun. It wouldn't bother me one bit to accelerate slowly, in order to prevent wear on the CVT. Not sure how exactly the Burgman CVT works. Gonna have to look it up. I think LeDude has a video.
 

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Blacktruck - Keep us posted on any moves you make. I'm an ole softie. I just know when my sons graduate from college, if they move to different areas, it's going to make me sad. Yet, going from one to the other on a Burgman or a Goldwing with a little camper like that sounds like fun. It wouldn't bother me one bit to accelerate slowly, in order to prevent wear on the CVT. Not sure how exactly the Burgman CVT works. Gonna have to look it up. I think LeDude has a video.
Yes sir I will. Like you said, as the kids get older, they move and develop their own lives and families. When I officially pull the plug on my working career, I would like to do the same thing. Traveling slow will be the way to go. LeDude has some fantastic info on the Burgman. There is a YouTube channel called Old Guy on a Bike that I watch often. That is the way he travels but he uses an ST Honda. Yea I think the Burgman would be a good mule but would need to be used within it's limitations. That and to keep the trailer from being as heavy as the bike. Finding a hitch for a 2013 and up is a bit of a challenge to buy off the shelf. I think a weekend in the garage with a welder and a few tools could overcome that issue.
 

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Really didn't intent to imply that I don't enjoy the destination but there are those who really don't care as much about the journey as the destination. And some who don't really care as much for the destination as the journey to get there. Not that anyone doesn't enjoy both. There is, however, a tendency to enjoy one more than the other. And preferences can, and do, change from time to time.
 

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If one could find a place and sneak and set up one of these little campers hidden somewhere, that would be so fun, sneaking around like that. But it would be fun to be in a campground too. Stealth camping is done from dual sport motorcycles. But with enough creativity and/or time, I would imagine a sneaky place could be found on a Burgman towing one of those little gems.
It's a slippery slope from stealth camping to out and out squatting. 😄 If that's the path you want to take, start out small with boondocking and work your way up. I hope you don't wind up trying to hop trains with a 618lb scooter. 🤪

I've heard for real, that you can boondock for free in some US National Forests and Grasslands, as long as you leave it like you found it. Of course there are no amenities. Google "camp for free" and it will find sites on how to do it.
Here's one just for fun: How to Find Free Camping in the US & Canada | Fresh Off The Grid
 
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