Suzuki Burgman USA Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,061 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Picked up our 650 in the rain Sept 6, traded in our 400 (put on 3,000 miles since June). Much more stable in the rain and cross winds. Smoooth, ride 2 up 90 % of the time, big difference. Chilly riding @ 40 degrees but not to bad. Can't wait untill next season for some serious road trips.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,363 Posts
New 650

Congratulations on your new 650! I really like mine.
A Givi windscreen, an electric vest, and winter riding gloves
can go a long way toward handling those chilly temps.

I did a 100 mile ride yesterday in chilly temps (high 40's)
and a short ride this morning (high 30's). The 650 has a
500 watt electrical system, so it handles electrically heated
clothing just fine, and the Givi screen has hand deflectors
that take the wind off of my hands. I plan on riding until
the first significant snowfall.

Paul
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,857 Posts
I have to comment on your Chilly conditions. Im still driving in 100+ heat here in Vegas. Im looking forward to 80 deg temps.
-Bryan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,363 Posts
Heated vests

I have a Widder vest and also their heated gloves. They are at least six years old and still work fine. The basic System 1 vest starts at $110 with a simple on/off switch power cord. I find this to be sufficient - I had a thermostat cord with a prior vest, and found it to be unnecessary. My vest is equivalent to the System 1.

http://www.widder.com/html/Product/System1/index.html

Widder also makes a more expensive ($140) System 2 vest - main difference is that it has a heated collar.

Gerbing also makes some fine electrically heated motorcycle clothing. I think they are a bit more expensive and draw more current, but they have some gear like heated long-sleeved Jacket liners that Widder doesn't make.

http://www.gerbing.com/pages/clothing/vests.html

Both Widder & Gerbing have been making heated clothing for a long time.

Aerostitch also has electric clothing now - their product line seems more similar to Gerbing than Widder in models & pricing.

http://www.aerostich.com/riderwearhouse.store
(Click on Kanetsu electric vest & liner)

Eclipse used to make electric vests - I used to have one. But I understand that they no longer produce them.

These vests are worth every penny, especially if you take trips. They don't take up much room to pack, and if the weather unexpectedly snaps cold, you are all set. Heated gloves are also nice in real cold weather if you don't have heated grips. I have no use for the heated chaps - long johns work fine & don't draw extra current - especially on a scooter where your legs are out of the airstream.

Paul
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
793 Posts
Elston and Diversey - Black Ice

Back in my old days in Chicago, I'd wear skiing gloves, courderoy pants, thermal underwear and a second pair of socks.
An open face helmet with hinged long visor and a piece of foam cut from an old couch's innards, stuffed just right between my neck, chin and the bottom of the visor made a wind seal.
While riding near Lake Michigan, frequent raising of the visor cleared away the fogging.
But it got so cold that I learned to exhale through the small opening in the side of the foam to keep the visor closed.

West of O'hare airport, the blowing snow was so cold it wouldn't stick to the ground. Starting out westbound at North Avenue and the Outer Drive, my 55 minute ride to Carol Stream was not just a ride but an adventure.

After my first cold winter of Chicagoland riding, I bought a snowmobile suit to ride my 79' Honda CB400A Hawk in relative comfort. If it got too cold still (less than 20f), I'd slow down so the wind wouldn't permeate through the material so quickly. If the wind was blowing just right, the heat of the engine would pass over one leg.
I could ride comfortably until the end of December, but after that I felt like the only bike on the street in the city of Chicago.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top