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I was test driving a used 2003 burgman 650 and I found that the acceleration was a bit jerky. Whenever I let go on the throttle and then accelerate again, the whole bike jerks forward. Also when I let go of the throttle, the whole bike slows down significantly like it is braking. Usually when I do that on my reflex, the bike will continue to coast and not slow down. Is there anything wrong with the burgman 650 I was test driving or is this normal?
 

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Engine braking is normal on the 650's I wouldn't worry about that on deceleration. Jerking going foward, is probably more due to the fact your eleminating the engine braking when you open the throttle.
Try a slower throttle rate, opening and closing, like shifting on a manual trans. smooth is best.
 

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The 'problem' that you've encountered is one of the things that have most endeared me to my Burger. Once you learn to moderate it, it will make for a safer and more enjoyable ride than you've ever had.

Steve
 

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You don't open and close the throttle abruptly on a 650 - wrong technique. You roll it up and down to adjust your speed. Think of it as a rheostat switch. It doesn't take long at all to get used to that.
 

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rliou said:
Is there anything wrong with the burgman 650 I was test driving or is this normal?
Sounds normal for a first-time rider on the 650. After a little practice, you'll adjust to it and find it to be one of the best features. It'll make you a smoother and faster rider in the twisties. :D
Don
 

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You will get used to it and love it!
 

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just keep an eye on the following traffic as during engine-braking the stop-lights dont show. More than once I almost got hit from the rear but only prevented from an accident by gently pulling the brakes so the stop-light would flash to keep the tupperware in shape :?
 

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I'm in the minority on this; as I've stated before I'd rather the bike didn't have this feature at all, or at the very least, could be dialed down a bit. However, I gladly accede to the wishes of the majority. Most people do appreciate it, so I won't ask Suzuki to change it on my account. :lol: Still, I wish there was there was a way to make it user-programmable; after all, this is something that's controlled by the electronics.

WLB :)
 

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brake lights

One of my first add ons is going to be the auto flashing LEDs for my engine braking problem/advantage, (depending on your point of view).

I want people to know I'm slowing down, and I don't want to be on the brakes all the time.
 

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rliou said:
I was test driving a used 2003 burgman 650 and I found that the acceleration was a bit jerky. Whenever I let go on the throttle and then accelerate again, the whole bike jerks forward. Also when I let go of the throttle, the whole bike slows down significantly like it is braking. Usually when I do that on my reflex, the bike will continue to coast and not slow down. Is there anything wrong with the burgman 650 I was test driving or is this normal?
You just sparked a deja vu to my first ride(s) with the 650. Same reaction! I didn't ever think I could make it smooth riding but I do! The only quirk now is putting on the left (rear) brake lightly to let others know I'm slowing down.
 

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When you just gently depress the brake handle and you hear it click, isn't it triggering the brake lights without "braking" at that point? If that's correct you won't lose any additional speed there from braking or cause any undue wear, but gain the visibility advantage.
If I'm mistaken on that observation please advise.
-Thx
 

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Anyone remember the bike you had as a kid? The rear hub would freewheel when you stopped pedalling, but engage the chain when you pedalled. I think that's what we all expected our scooters to do when we first rode them. Some emulate that more than others. My Honda 250 Elite would coast. The Yamaha majesty I test rode seemed the same. And I think the Aprillia 400 Atlantic I tested would coast too.

It's probably more the way the Burgman get power to the rear wheel. I don't know about the 400, but the 650's power goes through a series of gears, which is alot of hardware to "freewheel". By not releasing the clutch until the bike is under 6 or 7 mph, the mechanism can stay engaged and under control at any higher speed which might rattle the disengaged gears, perhaps wearing them out sooner. In other words, there is much more that has to keep turning if the bike coasts. That fancy CVT in the 650 works best if it stays engaged. No trouble trying to match engine/transmission speed to bike speed when re-engaging.

Lastly, the 650 is one HEAVY bike! It's easy to get to speed, but requires considerable braking to get all that weight stopped. Letting the engine help brake is greatly apprciated, once you get used to it. It will let your brakes last longer.
 

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Quick throttle

I'm finding that if I rest the outside ( pinky finger ) side of my right hand on the throttle endcap and control the throttle with just my fingers and the inside of my palm. it is MUCH easier to control that quick jerk the 650 gives you. This also gives me something to press against into a turn, rather than worrying so much about rolling the throttle during the process.

Also, make sure you you keep your wrist low, not level or high, when you are gripping the throttle. ( Listen to me, I sound like I'm an expert or something!!!!! :?: )


Bill
 

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A few things I have noticed since I got my burg a few weeks ago.

I am slowly getting better at feathering the throttle when turning, keeping the revs up so it doesn't jerk slow and then fast when accelerating out of a turn.

When coming to a stop, I used to find that when the clutch finally let go (about 7 to 10 kms ph), the bike would sort of surge forward into coast mode and upset my balance for a wobbly stop.
I have learned to control this by lightly applying the rear (left), brake lever to create a little drag, so the bike cannot suddenly bust loose and coast freely.

Eliminates that little sudden "being pushed" feeling and gives a more controlled stop without the wobbles.

This helps when approaching a line of cars that may be about to start moving again, but not necessarily before I have to put my foot down.

As mentioned elsewhere, a little applied throttle to keep the clutch engaged while rear braking helps to make the transition from slow speed to walking speed too, if you are waiting for the car directly in front of you to get moving.

I practice this any time there is no one behind me for a good distance.
The very slow speed stop. Helps with my stability and confidence etc.
Getting better at it, especially since I had my seat lowered so my feet can reach the ground better.

If I am coming to a more high speed type of stop, I use both brakes equally, with a light touch on the front one, keeping in mind the double discs and stopping power of the front brake. :wink:

Still a little nervous about applying brakes when turning, I have heard so many horror stories about that. Have to read up on that maneuvre.

Keep wondering what would happen if I was in the middle of a turn and a kid stepped out in front of me or something. Our instructors were adamant about straightening up the bike before braking.
Would clamping on the binders unhorse me?
Don't want to find out the hard way. :(


For the time being, I apply the brakes fairly aggressivley just before turning, while keeping a little throttle on, and as I enter the turn release the brakes and accelerate slightly out of the turn.

Hope this helps anyone reading with similar new burg rider experiences. :)
 

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lilleyen said:
Still a little nervous about applying brakes when turning, I have heard so many horror stories about that. Have to read up on that maneuvre.

Keep wondering what would happen if I was in the middle of a turn and a kid stepped out in front of me or something. Our instructors were adamant about straightening up the bike before braking.
Would clamping on the binders unhorse me?
Don't want to find out the hard way. :(
I think it's a case of 'everything in moderation'. The point they were making in the MSF class is that there's a limit to how much traction a tire can provide. When you're going straight, all of that traction can be applied to braking. When you're going around a corner, part of the friction is doing the cornering, so you have less friction force availible for braking. If you're on a wide, sweeping curve, you'll probably be O.K. braking and cornering. Just remember that if you have to come to a stop you have to get the bike upright before you stop, so you'll still have to do the 'square the bars and apply brakes'. Everyone ends up getting into a corner too fast once in a while and needs to touch the brake a little.

The biggest concern is when it's wet and there's much less traction. Someone here recently dumped his Majesty when he was merging or changing lanes when traffic slowed, and it was raining. The combination of braking, cornering, and wet roads is not good.

Even when it's dry, though, it's best not to brake in a corner. As you learned in the MSF class, the bike is more stable if you roll on the throttle as you go through the corner. Accelerating stabilizes the bike by biasing the weight rearward. If you apply the brakes, now you're shifting the weight forward, which isn't as stable.
 
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