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I want to to share my experience with my new to me 2017 Burgman 200. Years ago I had the Burgman 650. It was awesome! But heavy and only returned between 42 and 44 mpg. I sold it to buy a SUV. With the SUV gone some years later I was ready for another scooter. I sat on both a 200 and a 400. The 200 felt better to me. It was not comfortable the way the 650 was, but the 200 was comfortable enough. I am 6 foot tall and north of 300 lbs. In 16 years of street riding I took an interstate or freeway less than ten times. I did not need the big 650 this go around. I have owned the 200 for 7 days now and I know I made the right choice buying the 200. I could have gone with a 125 cc scooter to handle the 2.8 mile commute to work, but I did want some extra zoom. Having a day off I took the scooter out on the parkway to open the throttle. I brought it up to 55 mph and it was no problem. The 650 did feel more stable to me, but the 200 felt good to me. I next hoped on 495 for an exit and brought it up to 65 mph. I did not feel comfortable at that speed on the scoot, it has been a couple years going that fast on 2 wheels, but it was stable and fine. And during the ride the display showed 72.9 mpg!

I hope my experience so far can help anyone decide if the 200 "is enough" for them.
 

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From what I've read it will do 75 - 80 but takes a bit of time to get there, so not really practical at those speeds, like any other bike at its max. On the ride today had the B400 up to 100 indicated, but that was WOT downhill on the expressway, and not something you really need to do anyway. Thanks for the review.
 

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From what I've read it will do 75 - 80 but takes a bit of time to get there, so not really practical at those speeds, like any other bike at its max. On the ride today had the B400 up to 100 indicated, but that was WOT downhill on the expressway, and not something you really need to do anyway. Thanks for the review.
What MPG do you get?
 

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What MPG do you get?
It varies depending on where I ride, but overall I'm getting around 60 mpg, maybe a little less if it's mostly around town or I push it hard. The gauge on the dash consistently reads about 2 mpg lower than actual.
 

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Keep in mind the indicated mpg is not the same as calculated mpg. Same as the speed being different between indicated and actual.
My 2005 Burgman 650 was regularly getting 50-52 mpg for my riding style. My current 2013 model is doing a bit more than 5-6 mpg more for the same kind of riding.

My first bike was 125cc Harley Davidson. At the time I felt that was plenty. I went bigger when I returned to riding after a 19 year absence from 2 wheels since I was doing mostly Interstate on my commute. Now I'm retired but still sometimes get out on the highways. When I get older and unable to tolerate longer travel I'll consider a smaller scooter. Maybe something more like the 200.
 

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It is hard for me to justify owing a 650 now that I am not commuting. I did commute for 8 months on a Suzuki 425E that was not fun. That was when i jumped in 2006 to a AN650.

But not doing 18,000 miles a year I may be looking for a smaller bike that will still let me zip for 4 miles at 65 MPH once or twice every 3 months of so. I am following these type posts.

Once a year I do like to go on a 480 mile North Cascades Hyway loop. It consists of 3 mountain passes and the speeds are between 55-70 MPH with some blasts to pass a truck at 80 MPH. I just don't know if a UH-200 could keep up with Daboo on his BMW F800. :(

Not commuting in 'Stop and Stop' driving means I could get a shifter bike again. Pulling a clutch in in commuting was the main reason, #1, for going to the Burgman.
 

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It is hard for me to justify owing a 650 now that I am not commuting. I did commute for 8 months on a Suzuki 425E that was not fun. That was when i jumped in 2006 to a AN650.

But not doing 18,000 miles a year I may be looking for a smaller bike that will still let me zip for 4 miles at 65 MPH once or twice every 3 months of so. I am following these type posts.

Once a year I do like to go on a 480 mile North Cascades Hyway loop. It consists of 3 mountain passes and the speeds are between 55-70 MPH with some blasts to pass a truck at 80 MPH. I just don't know if a UH-200 could keep up with Daboo on his BMW F800. :(

Not commuting in 'Stop and Stop' driving means I could get a shifter bike again. Pulling a clutch in in commuting was the main reason, #1, for going to the Burgman.
30 miles a day at 70 mph cruise, still waiting on that shiftless electric
 

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On the ride today had the B400 up to 100 indicated
I am struggling to reconcile this riding behavior with the mild-mannered gentleman who purchased my Corbin seat and Givi doo-dads. o_O
 

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I am struggling to reconcile this riding behavior with the mild-mannered gentleman who purchased my Corbin seat and Givi doo-dads. o_O
Lol...once in a while I let my inner hooligan out. But you'll never see me popping a wheelie riding down the road, like I saw one day. Saw it from a ways off...looked sort of like a motorcycle but not really. Couldn't figure it out until he was closer - was on one wheel for at least a mile probably doing 60+.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
It is hard for me to justify owing a 650 now that I am not commuting. I did commute for 8 months on a Suzuki 425E that was not fun. That was when i jumped in 2006 to a AN650.

But not doing 18,000 miles a year I may be looking for a smaller bike that will still let me zip for 4 miles at 65 MPH once or twice every 3 months of so. I am following these type posts.

Once a year I do like to go on a 480 mile North Cascades Hyway loop. It consists of 3 mountain passes and the speeds are between 55-70 MPH with some blasts to pass a truck at 80 MPH. I just don't know if a UH-200 could keep up with Daboo on his BMW F800. :(

Not commuting in 'Stop and Stop' driving means I could get a shifter bike again. Pulling a clutch in in commuting was the main reason, #1, for going to the Burgman.
After experiencing the automatic on the burgman 650 I never wanted to commute on the DR650 since my 13 mile ride home was in DC traffic for the start of it. Folks can bust my chops all they want, a scooter is a pleasure to commute on. If my job ever changes and I "need" more bike, I know the 650 is perfect for me.
 

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Giving up your 650 Dave? Wow.

As I've noted I debate that right up until I ride it again. Then stop until I've spent too much time on the SYM, then ride it again and the cycle repeats.

Far as lighter stuff. I'd check out an Xmax. The B200 is a little quicker than my SYM, but not a lot. I did a couple rides with a guy who had one.
He seemed to do the freeway just fine including a fast ride from Monroe to Bellevue up the long climb, but the bike wouldn't do well with the 80mph blasts.
Folks with the Xmax 300 note it's just fine. That, & the BV350 are really the only current production bikes in that category that I'm aware of. If looking used there are more options.
Of course if ya do get shifty there's a lot out there, but ya know that already ;)


It is hard for me to justify owing a 650 now that I am not commuting. I did commute for 8 months on a Suzuki 425E that was not fun. That was when i jumped in 2006 to a AN650.

But not doing 18,000 miles a year I may be looking for a smaller bike that will still let me zip for 4 miles at 65 MPH once or twice every 3 months of so. I am following these type posts.

Once a year I do like to go on a 480 mile North Cascades Hyway loop. It consists of 3 mountain passes and the speeds are between 55-70 MPH with some blasts to pass a truck at 80 MPH. I just don't know if a UH-200 could keep up with Daboo on his BMW F800. :(

Not commuting in 'Stop and Stop' driving means I could get a shifter bike again. Pulling a clutch in in commuting was the main reason, #1, for going to the Burgman.
 

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I want to to share my experience with my new to me 2017 Burgman 200. Years ago I had the Burgman 650. It was awesome! But heavy and only returned between 42 and 44 mpg. I sold it to buy a SUV. With the SUV gone some years later I was ready for another scooter. I sat on both a 200 and a 400. The 200 felt better to me. It was not comfortable the way the 650 was, but the 200 was comfortable enough. I am 6 foot tall and north of 300 lbs. In 16 years of street riding I took an interstate or freeway less than ten times. I did not need the big 650 this go around. I have owned the 200 for 7 days now and I know I made the right choice buying the 200. I could have gone with a 125 cc scooter to handle the 2.8 mile commute to work, but I did want some extra zoom. Having a day off I took the scooter out on the parkway to open the throttle. I brought it up to 55 mph and it was no problem. The 650 did feel more stable to me, but the 200 felt good to me. I next hoped on 495 for an exit and brought it up to 65 mph. I did not feel comfortable at that speed on the scoot, it has been a couple years going that fast on 2 wheels, but it was stable and fine. And during the ride the display showed 72.9 mpg!

I hope my experience so far can help anyone decide if the 200 "is enough" for them.
Hi,
I also had the 650 and loved it but it was too big for my city and suburban driving. I switched to a Yamaha Vino 125 but it slowed to a crawl on hills (we don't have many in SW Florida but still...) I was going to buy an SMax or PCX when I discovered the 200. I'm glad I bought it, like Goldilocks it's "just right" for city and secondary roads. Plus I can park it on the sidewalk and no one (meaning the parking police) seems to care. I wouldn't take it on the highway unless it was absolutely necessary. It may have the top end but you'd be maxed out and it's very light. I miss cruising and am looking at a Kawasaki Vulcan S to do some long distance touring but I will keep my Burgman for daily use. For my needs it's just about perfect. Also I switched to Michelins and the mileage readout shows an increase from 65-67 mpg to 76! It doesn't seem possible but that's what it says and the ride is much better. Other useful additions were 90 degree valve stems and a high beam headlight oscillator. It's hard to say definitively but it seems fewer people start to pullout in front of me. I also added chirping turn indicators since I always forgot to cancel them. Next up are a flashing rear brake light relay and a louder horn.You can't be noticed too much on any kind of a bike.
 

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...Other useful additions were 90 degree valve stems and a high beam headlight oscillator. It's hard to say definitively but it seems fewer people start to pullout in front of me. I also added chirping turn indicators since I always forgot to cancel them. Next up are a flashing rear brake light relay and a louder horn.You can't be noticed too much on any kind of a bike.
I installed a headlight modulator on my first bike, a Vulcan 500. I swear people must have thought I was leo as it seems like they would always slow way down when I got behind them. And that was in the early days of my ridkng when my riding style was a bit more "relaxed" than now.
 

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From what I've read it will do 75 - 80 but takes a bit of time to get there, so not really practical at those speeds, like any other bike at its max. On the ride today had the B400 up to 100 indicated, but that was WOT downhill on the expressway, and not something you really need to do anyway. Thanks for the review.
The B200 tops out at about 75 MPH (GPS) while claiming it's doing 80+.
A good highway cruise speed is 65 MPH (GPS, indicated 69). Pushing it harder takes a toll on MPG and belt life, but the bike's still stable (if lightweight) at those speeds. Still has some pull from 65-70, but that last 5 MPH will take a while.

It's a great little commuter bike when ridden within its limits. For touring with extended highway runs, or 2-up highway runs, the 400 would be much better.

But then, I have a 650 too, so I don't have to worry about it.
 

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My B200 numbers are identical to @Rusty J ’s.

I just rode mine on a five day, 1500 mile loop from Houston, north to Talihina OK, then east to Hot Springs, then north into the Ozarks, and finally back to Houston, primarily on backroads, but occasionally on the interstate when needed. There were four of us.

On the last day I rode home to Houston, alone, as the others continued the tour of the Ozarks for another day or two. The ride home was nonstop, covering 505 miles in 10:20 hours. The B200 cruises easily at 60 - 65 mph (gps), and in the DRAFT of the occasional interstate, 75 was maintainable with some throttle left.

So, would I tour the B200 again? Yep. Absolutely. Did I miss the extra cc’s? Not really.

I have three mods: 1) Givi top box 2) One of those cheapo throttle friction locks, and 3) The big Givi wind screen (which I cut four inches off the top). For my tastes, the stock screen is too small, and the un-modified Givi punches too big a hole (fuel mileage suffered). But, the cut down version is certainly an improvement over the stock screen.

Cheers
 

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There's an OEM tall ("touring") windscreen that's pretty good, and doesn't hurt MPG much.
Your cut-down Givi is probably similar enough that it's not worth the expense of trying it though.

I went back to stock mostly for better vision in rain and fog (looking over a wet windscreen) since the B200 was my all-weather commuter bike back in The Before Times. Now I have an unfaired motorcycle too (Husky Svartpilen 401) and work remotely, I might go back to the tall one on the B200.
 
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