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Got a question,

My neighbor has a Honda Reflex 250 and I always see her shut it off while she is approaching her driveway while the scooter is still rolling. I started doing this too, but occasionally my Burgman 400 will shut itself off while I'm still riding it. This has happened to me 4 times in the past month. I asked my Suzuki dealer mechanic and he said it could be bad/old gasoline. I agreed with him because I used some old ass gas before the problem happened. (Not gonna do that again.) :kermit:

Not sure what's going on, but will shutting off the bike while rolling actually cause damage? Or should I just park the bike, and then shut it off? I like the idea of saving gas by shutting off the engine asap, but don't want to cause any potential damage. Thanks.

Thanks
 

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I don't think it will cause damage but it could be a safety hazard, depending on where you are when the power is cut. Personally the only time I would try doing that is for doing spark plug chops.

Plug chops are when you you want to see how rich/lean your mix is at a given rpm. You put in a new plug run it at the rpm for a ways and then cut the engine. Then you cut{chop} the plug and see what color the ring is on the insulator. With a fuel injected 4-stroke this isn't needed unless you start modding it for racing and then there are better ways{fuel-air meter}.
 

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Cant see how it will damage the scoot but I used to do it
in the car till I managed to lock the steering, never again
on anything.
 

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I guess it depends on how you shut off the engine.

I wouldn't recommend shutting it off by putting down the side stand :sad5:
 

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It won't hurt anything. I found out if you're running 70 and run out of gas, the engine will turn until you get down to about 5 MPH and the clutch disengages.
 

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I've done it many times with no ill effects to the bike. However, the engine will continue to spin until the clutch disengages at around 10-15 mph, then you'll just coast to a stop.
 

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It won't hurt anything. I found out if you're running 70 and run out of gas, the engine will turn until you get down to about 5 MPH and the clutch disengages.
That's on the 650. The 400s clutch disengages sooner.
 

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I like the idea of saving gas by shutting off the engine asap, but don't want to cause any potential damage. Thanks.
Thanks
As good as these scooters are on gas I can't see where you could save enough to make much difference. Personally I start my scooters as soon as I sit on it. I see people sit on their scooter and back out from where they park then start it. I feel I have better control with the engine running starting or coming to a stop. If the scooter starts to fall with the engine running you can keep it up by giving a little fuel. With the engine off you have no real way to control it. Just my opinion, and we all know about opinions.
 

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The 650s (especially prior to the '13 models) tend to resist being pushed backwards with the engine running, as the clutch is slightly engaged even at normal idle (let alone the startup high-idle).

One interesting thing is that if you're coasting with the clutch disengaged -- as in starting out rolling down a hill without applying throttle -- the clutch will not engage even when the bike reaches the speed (8 MPH or so) when it would if you were accelerating. This can come as a surprise if you were expecting engine braking to kick in...

On the other hand, things could also get "interesting" if you were coasting at a good clip then applied throttle (thereby engaging the clutch).
 

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Good engine practice is to let the motor warm through before moving off so that all moving parts are warm and in "running" condition before increasing cylinder pressure when loading the engine. Then to let it idle a short time at no load when at the end of use, so as to disperse the heat from the combustion chamber. Such small fuel saving against risk of damage if switching off when the engine is still very hot. My place is on a hill and a 1km run and 120m climb so even more important to let the engine cool.

Be aware that cutting the ignition also may switch of the controlling computers - not sure what effect that might have in addition to loss of function e.g. ABS system
 

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kxj5906, I would not switch off the engine before stopping. There may be potential safety issues depending on how fast you are going and where you do it. It does not save any extra fuel. When you close the throttle on these fuel injected bikes, the fuel flow ceases completely until just before idle speed is reached or on the 400 until around clutch disengagement. Some older carb engines do this too. So closing the throttle fully cuts off the fuel supply even when you are slowing down, just like in any modern car. That's how they work.

Regarding your engine cutting out occasionally when riding. It may be the bad gas you used. But a key factor that's been established by members here and on other sites and which I have also posted about previously is to do with the starting up technique. It's important to make sure you allow the bikes computer to "boot-up" correctly before you push the starter button. So the correct technique is to switch on the ignition, wait for both tacho and speedo needles to complete their sweep around the dials and the fuel pump to stop priming, AND WITH THE THROTTLE CLOSED push the button. In fact make sure you keep the throttle closed at all times during the initial boot up too. During boot up the computer is checking the throttle position sensor to set it's operating parameters. If you open it even slightly it will confuse the computer and cause stalling. It takes just seconds for the boot up process to happen but if you interrupt it by pressing the starter button to soon the computer will load a "default basic" ignition and fuel injection map. This means you will have a little less fuel economy and performance. One of it's side effects is to cause the engine to stall near or at idle and for the idle speed to vary more. Idle may fall too low causing the stall. I had the same thing when I first got my bike, waiting for the boot up cured all! New bikes are sometimes more prone to stalling as the engines are very tight but the problem goes away as the engine loosens and if you follow correct starting technique. Enjoy your ride.
 

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Chatman saidhe would not shut the engine off by putting down the side stand...why not? I do that all the time..Ithen turn ooff the key and I turn it off with the side stand when I am stopped (of course).. This is the 1st time I have heard anyone say that I should not turn it off like that..
 

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Chatman saidhe would not shut the engine off by putting down the side stand...why not? I do that all the time..Ithen turn ooff the key and I turn it off with the side stand when I am stopped (of course).. This is the 1st time I have heard anyone say that I should not turn it off like that..
Read the thread title. You still haven't heard anyone say that.

My response was in jest, hence the bug eyes.
 

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Recalled the conversation between two guys on fuel economy thereupon

- I heard there could be another gas price rise.
- But how should it affect you -- you've got no car!
- Yeah, but I have a gas lighter!

:D
 

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Chatman saidhe would not shut the engine off by putting down the side stand...why not? I do that all the time..Ithen turn ooff the key and I turn it off with the side stand when I am stopped (of course).. This is the 1st time I have heard anyone say that I should not turn it off like that..
I've shut off my engine with the side stand since I forgot to put it down on a BMW and watched it fall over in a parking lot with a bunch of people watching about 8 years ago. I had been riding over 35 years before I did it.
 

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Good engine practice is to let the motor warm through before moving off so that all moving parts are warm and in "running" condition before increasing cylinder pressure when loading the engine. Then to let it idle a short time at no load when at the end of use, so as to disperse the heat from the combustion chamber.
I start and immediately go and when I stop, I immediately turn the engine off. Been doing this for over 50 years with everything I have had and have never had a problem. I think the most miles on a car was a little over 250,000 and my 16 motorcycles/scooters have never had a problem. You just start out at a moderate speed until the temperature gauge starts to move. The only time you need to let it idle at the end of use is when you have a turbo and coming off a high speed run.
 

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Every once in awhile mine will "blow out" when coming to a stop and it just rolls. I say "blow out", because in r/c cars when the motor leans out at the end of the tank, it blows itself out, which to me seems like it occurs when it happens.

I would think it's more unsafe in the fact that if she happened not to see something and she needed to hit the gas to get around it, or if something should happen to stop her forward progress, and she needed to gas it to regain balance. Good luck and ride safe~!
 
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