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Too bad I didn't know about the Iron Butt Association a year ago; the southbound part of my Canada to Mexico and back trip would have qualified for at least one award. :cry:

I think I'll do it again this summer. :twisted:
 

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Randy said:
...in order to win you need to do everything contrary to safe riding...
I don't agree.

For example, to earn a Saddle Sore 1000 award, all you need to do is go 1000 miles in 24 hours. That equates to an average speed of 41.666MPH.

Even stopping for 10 - 15 minutes every time you got gas, and taking two 20 - 30 minute meal breaks you could do it safely. The only thing out of the ordinary would be staying at it for 24 hours instead of the usual 6 to 8 hours of a more typical long trip.

For the Border to Border award, the one I'll be doing, you have 36 hours to go from the Canadian Border to the Mexican border. When I did it last summer, via I-5 between Blaine, Washington and San Diego, California I travelled about 1350 miles in three days, and I was making stops to visit family on the way down.

I've recalculated the trip with the award rules in mind, and this time I'll be going from Richmond, B.C. to Tijuana, Mexico -- 1410.8 miles, again via I-5 (or foreign equivalents). I've calculated the route to include stopping for 20 minutes every three hours, riding from 8:00AM - 9:45PM the first day, spending the night in Red Bluff, California, then riding from 8:00AM - 7:36PM the second day. Elapsed Time: 35 hours and 36 minutes. Actual Riding Time: 23 hours and 2 minutes. Distances: 758.3 miles the first day, and 652.5 the second.

If I cut 4 of the 7 breaks from 20 minutes to 15, and only stay in Red Bluff for 9 hours instead of 10 hours and 15 minutes, I'll have an extra cushion and still be riding safely.

If I feel really crazy, I could push myself to do it without stopping for the night in Red Bluff, and get the Border to Border Insanity Award for doing it in 24 hours (but I'm not that insane).

And BTW, all the calculations were done with assumed speeds of 60 to 70MPH on the freeways, and we all know that in much of California no one only goes 70 on the freeways.

Bottom line: long days -- yes. Tiring -- yes. Unsafe -- not really. You just have to follow the Boy Scout motto:Be Prepared.
 

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Randy said:
Brian wrote
The only thing out of the ordinary would be staying at it for 24 hours instead of the usual 6 to 8 hours of a more typical long trip.
Well it's just me then, I only put on about 22000 miles a year on my bike, but I am not riding 24 hours with out sleep- and if I did for me it would me contrary to safe riding.
No, it's not just you. My point was that not everything about the Iron Butt rides was unsafe. All the possible awards are designed to allow them to be earned without exceeding speed limits, riding through unsafe territory, or in an unsafe manner (there's no award for canyon jumping, for example).

I agree that going 24 hours at a stretch isn't advisable on a regualr basis, but then again I don't see anything wrong with pushing oneself to stretch the limits once in a while. And as my example showed, there are trips possible that do allow plenty of sleep each night, and are still "award winning" rides.
 

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Wimps! :p

:lol: JK

I promise, if I start to see a degradation in my physical or mental fitness (both of which are pretty good) I'll pull over. As a former cop and ambulance driver, let me assure you: I'm no daredevil. Tough, yes; stupid or reckless, no.

I can't speak for conditions in the UK or elsewhere, but on the route I'm taking it's all two or more lanes in each direction, with plenty of state operated rest areas, and towns both large and small along the way.

I've already ridden the route once (and driven it many times in cages over the years); I'm just going to be doing it for a few more hours each day than I've done before.

I'll be going in August or September when the weather on the west coast is at its best. I'll have my bike fully serviced and new tires before I go.

I'm a highly experienced driver, having been driving since 1969. I've completed two EVOCs (Emergency Vehicle Operator's Courses), one for police cars and one for ambulances. I am a current holder of a Class B CDL (Commercial Driver's License - Any vehicle except Class A combination vehicles), endorsed for "All Passenger Vehicles (Buses)" and "Two-wheel and Three-wheel motorcycles." I hold a current DOT Medical Examiner's Certificate, and my only restriction is corrective lenses (I can pass the "civilian" eye test, but not the CDL eye test because my left eye is a slightly too near-sighted).

I think I can do this without putting the public with whom I share the road in any danger. If I didn't, I wouldn't do it.
 

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thunder53fl said:
When I was a trucker, the law was 15 hrs maximum on duty - no more than 10 of which could be logged behind the wheel, followed by 8 hrs off duty. That was 20 yrs ago, it may have changed since then. There were also rules for maximum hrs in a 7 or 8 day period.
Here are the current "Hours of Service" rules:

New HOS Rules

Compliance Required On & After January 4, 2004

CMV driver may drive 11 hours, following 10 hours off-duty.

CMV driver may not drive beyond the 14th hour after coming-on duty, following 10 hours off-duty.

CMV driver may not drive after 60/70 hours on-duty in 7/8 consecutive days.

A driver may restart a 7/8 consecutive day period after taking 34 or more consecutive hours off-duty.
16-Hour Exception For Property-Carrying Drivers
Drivers may extend the 14-hour on-duty period by 2 additional hours IF THEY:

Are released from duty at the normal work reporting location for the previous 5 duty tours; AND
Return to their normal work reporting location and are released from duty within 16 hours; AND
Have not used this exception in the previous 6 days, except following a 34-hour restart of a 7/8-day period.

Total hours driving may not exceed 11 hours.

U.S Department of Transportation

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration
They've extended the driving hours allowed from 10 hours to 11, but also increased the minimum time off from 8 hours to 10.

The rules were devised to provide the best compromise between safety and profitability for the average commercial driver who is driving long distances regularly. Statistics show that a disproportionate number of crashes involving commercial drivers happened to those who exceeded those limits.

I don't think a larger than average number of crashes can be attributed to riders of IBA challenges.

For my Border to Border challenge I've plugged the DOT regulations into Microsoft Streets and Trips, and by raising my projected average speed from 60 to 65 (legal or below legal on most of I-5), and adjusting my rest breaks and fuel stops, I can do this challenge within the DOT Commercial Driver's limits, even though I'm not legally required to do so.

By shaving a mere 62 minutes off my total driving time I was able to get it down to 22 hours (11 each day), and allow more than 10 hours off between them. I was already below the 14 hours "on duty" per day limit (08:00 - 21:45 (13:45 duty hours) the first day, and 08:00 - 19:36 (11:36 duty hours) the second day). Now I'll be even further within the limits.

The United States Department of Transportation's Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration says my plan is safe and legal. That's good enough for me.
 

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chiefkeefe said:
...Now, if this sort of pedigree was a prerequisite for taking part in this sort of challenge, then I'd feel a little happier.

Sadly it's not, so I don't.
I'd feel happier if they charged with attempted murder anyone caught operating a motor vehicle within an hour of consumming alcohol.

But they don't, so I don't.

I guess neither of us will be very happy with the status quo.
 

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chiefkeefe said:
...Actually, over here, they've introduced very stringent laws to deal with those who cause death by dangerous driving, whether the result of ineptitude, drunkenness, drugs or tiredness.
I wish it were so over here.

The way things stand now, if a drunk driver kills someone he or she is likely to get no more than 6 months in jail and a few hundred dollars in fines. It's outrageous.
 

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NormanB said:
Brian

I admire your approach. Using those benchmarks from the HOS 'rules' is a most sensible and responsible approach.

Hopefully the Iron Butt chappies who regulate and make awards should take cognizance! :)
Not all of the possible IBA rides can be completed within the DOT's Hours of Service limits, but some can. Even those that can't, though, are set up so they can be completed without breaking any laws, and without riding in a patently unsafe manner.

Here are some extracts from the IBA's Web site [emphasis added]:

The 19,000+ members of the Iron Butt Association are dedicated to safe, long-distance motorcycle riding.
No preregistration is needed for the SaddleSore or Bun Burner rides. We feel this removes the pressure to complete the ride should you become tired or otherwise feel unsafe. While group SaddleSore rides bring with them the safety of group travel, they can also increase your risk by encouraging you to press on when you might otherwise stop. Group rides can also encourage aggressive riding. Be sure riding styles of others in your group match your style. When planning a ride, keep in mind that group rides are only as fast as the slowest person in the group. This can extend your riding day many hours pushing you toward fatigue.

Motorcycling comes with risk and riding 1,000 miles or more increases your risk substantially. It is imperative you understand the risk you are taking and minimize the possibility of an accident by practicing safe motorcycle habits. No one, not even the most experienced long distance rider, can safely fight off fatigue. If you are tired, the only option is to stop and rest. Ignoring the symptoms of fatigue can be fatal. The SaddleSore and BunBurner rides enjoy a fantastic safety record but to continue this record requires you to do your part. If you are tired, having a bad day, or facing other hurtles that are impacting your riding skills, please stop and rest so that you may enjoy motorcycling another day!

Please remember that the Iron Butt Association is dedicated to the sport of safe, long-distance motorcycle riding. It does not condone nor will it tolerate unsafe activities such as excessive speed, reckless motorcycle operation, riding while fatigued or otherwise impaired, the use of stimulants to maintain alertness, or any other activity that results in riders exceeding their personal limits. Any rider found to have engaged in these or other unsafe activities, as determined in the sole discretion of the IBA, will have their certification refused. If the certification is already issued and we find out about these infractions after the fact, the certification will be revoked. For these purposes, the IBA will consider as an admission of violating this policy any public statements made by the participant that describe participation in unsafe activities during a ride subject to certification.
While not everyone will agree that this type of riding is safe, it is done within legal limits, and therefor is a right and a personal choice.
 

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Re: I made it. One long ride!

camrakid said:
...I headed back out at 8:50 am, and rode another 911 miles to home (Wichita, KS), arriving about 2:45am....
Oh; you were so close!

911 miles in less than 18 hours (average speed: 50.6MPH). Another 89 miles and you would have qualified for a SS1000 (assuming you kept the proper records/witness statements). And you would have had 6 more hours in which to do it.

Now that you're home safe and sound (and congrats on that), do you think you might try for an award someday, or did this convince you that endurance riding is not for you?

[Edit] Never mind; I just read you next post:
camrakid said:
...The satisfaction of knowing I made it that far total (1402 miles) on my first trip with is is good enough for me. I really don't see the need to prove a person can do the type of mileage for the awards....
That's okay; whatever kind of riding you choose to do, I know you'll enjoy it on a Burgman.

Well...maybe not motocross. :D
 
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