Suzuki Burgman USA Forum banner

1 - 20 of 43 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone have any information on how you go about getting the iron butt/sore saddle award. The shipping company I had selected (Daily Direct) delayed things so many times I finally am saying heck with it and flying to Orlando, FL and riding my 650 to Wichita, KS. Due to othter obligations, I will probably make this ride non stop (except for gas). Looking forward to the adventure, but maybe not the weather. If anyone has infomation about what information etc. is needed to get the awards, a reply to this post woudl be appreciated.

Wish I could attend bike week since I'll be close, but obligations becon.

Thanks,

Jeff
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
925 Posts
Good luck on your journey. What a perfect way to get to know your new Burgman!! 8)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,385 Posts
That is going to be one long trip. I hope you at least spend the night someplace. Do you know what route you will be taking and what cities you are going through. Anyone living around those areas maybe able to help with any sort of construction info or shortcuts through the town.

Just a thought.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
saddlesore cities traveled

I will be starting out in The Villages, FL. (approx. 60 miles N of Orlando)
I will head to Atlanta, GA on I-75, I-20 to Birmighmam, AL, up to Memphis on I-78, over to Oklahoma city on I-40, and up to Wichita on I-35. Mapquest shows it to be 1344 miles. I will be starting out about 6:30 pm tomorrow, after flying into Orlando. Due to obligations, I plan on riding non stop (except to fuel and bathroom breaks).

Anyone with any travel advisories or weather condition reports, all informaiton appreciated.

Thanks,

Jeff

Live to Ride, but ride to live!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,919 Posts
That's cool, and good luck buddy! Feedback the road trip report asap upon your safe return.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,296 Posts
Jeff

That distance is twice the recommended interval for first service!

Enjoy the trip.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,411 Posts
Too bad I didn't know about the Iron Butt Association a year ago; the southbound part of my Canada to Mexico and back trip would have qualified for at least one award. :cry:

I think I'll do it again this summer. :twisted:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,385 Posts
NormanB said:
Jeff

That distance is twice the recommended interval for first service!

Enjoy the trip.
Norm, if you are talking about the 600 mile service, I think he's picking up a used bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
719 Posts
I did it in July of last year on a trip from North Carolina to Nova Scotia. You really do have to be very careful with your paperwork, receipts, log, signatures at the start and finish. Also, make sure that your moto odometer is accurate. Before you leave town, plot your route on a map site on the net (like Mapsonus.com), or better, the MapSource program which comes with a Garmin GPS.

The Iron Butt folks check out the route very carefully. (I think the odo on the 650 is very close, and the speedo is about 10% slow oddly enough.) After you send the stuff to the association, you can expect to wait many months for the conformation to come back. They emailed me first, and then the certificate came quite a bit later, around the first of December.

Rest well before, relax, travel at the same speed as moderately fast traffic.

Speaking of Iron Butt rides, I got my April "Motorcycle Consumer News" today and they report:

Morris Kruemcke, rider of a 2001 Gold Wing, has recently set a new record for riding to each of the lower 48 states. Kruemcke's record breaking time was five days eight hours, and 52 minutes. The previous record was set by a rider on a BMW with a time of five days, 12 hours and 42 minutes
Figure on a bit over 7000 miles. One of us needs to go whup up on that record with a Burgman!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,385 Posts
Just keep in mind that pushing like that will tire you out, both mental & physical.
Iron-butt or trip to the store - one stupid mistake and your in a world of hurt.
Personally I just don't see it simply because in order to win you need to do everything contrary to safe riding
-Hell of a gamble -if you win you get a piece of paper -if you lose no one ever heard of you
-either way don't become an accident looking for a place to happen. :wink:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,411 Posts
Randy said:
...in order to win you need to do everything contrary to safe riding...
I don't agree.

For example, to earn a Saddle Sore 1000 award, all you need to do is go 1000 miles in 24 hours. That equates to an average speed of 41.666MPH.

Even stopping for 10 - 15 minutes every time you got gas, and taking two 20 - 30 minute meal breaks you could do it safely. The only thing out of the ordinary would be staying at it for 24 hours instead of the usual 6 to 8 hours of a more typical long trip.

For the Border to Border award, the one I'll be doing, you have 36 hours to go from the Canadian Border to the Mexican border. When I did it last summer, via I-5 between Blaine, Washington and San Diego, California I travelled about 1350 miles in three days, and I was making stops to visit family on the way down.

I've recalculated the trip with the award rules in mind, and this time I'll be going from Richmond, B.C. to Tijuana, Mexico -- 1410.8 miles, again via I-5 (or foreign equivalents). I've calculated the route to include stopping for 20 minutes every three hours, riding from 8:00AM - 9:45PM the first day, spending the night in Red Bluff, California, then riding from 8:00AM - 7:36PM the second day. Elapsed Time: 35 hours and 36 minutes. Actual Riding Time: 23 hours and 2 minutes. Distances: 758.3 miles the first day, and 652.5 the second.

If I cut 4 of the 7 breaks from 20 minutes to 15, and only stay in Red Bluff for 9 hours instead of 10 hours and 15 minutes, I'll have an extra cushion and still be riding safely.

If I feel really crazy, I could push myself to do it without stopping for the night in Red Bluff, and get the Border to Border Insanity Award for doing it in 24 hours (but I'm not that insane).

And BTW, all the calculations were done with assumed speeds of 60 to 70MPH on the freeways, and we all know that in much of California no one only goes 70 on the freeways.

Bottom line: long days -- yes. Tiring -- yes. Unsafe -- not really. You just have to follow the Boy Scout motto:Be Prepared.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,385 Posts
Brian wrote
The only thing out of the ordinary would be staying at it for 24 hours instead of the usual 6 to 8 hours of a more typical long trip.
Well it's just me then, I only put on about 22000 miles a year on my bike, but I am not riding 24 hours with out sleep- and if I did for me it would me contrary to safe riding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,363 Posts
Randy,

It isn't just you. There is a point where any of us get fatigued (mentally and/or physically) to the point where we should not press on. This point can differ between individuals of course. For me, my limit is about 500 miles in a day. But this can vary a bit depending on weather conditions, how well I slept the night before, etc. And within that 500 miles I take frequent short breaks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,411 Posts
Randy said:
Brian wrote
The only thing out of the ordinary would be staying at it for 24 hours instead of the usual 6 to 8 hours of a more typical long trip.
Well it's just me then, I only put on about 22000 miles a year on my bike, but I am not riding 24 hours with out sleep- and if I did for me it would me contrary to safe riding.
No, it's not just you. My point was that not everything about the Iron Butt rides was unsafe. All the possible awards are designed to allow them to be earned without exceeding speed limits, riding through unsafe territory, or in an unsafe manner (there's no award for canyon jumping, for example).

I agree that going 24 hours at a stretch isn't advisable on a regualr basis, but then again I don't see anything wrong with pushing oneself to stretch the limits once in a while. And as my example showed, there are trips possible that do allow plenty of sleep each night, and are still "award winning" rides.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,296 Posts
What are the driving limits in the States for a commercial driver (Big Rig or Greyhound Bus for example)?

I do not recall the exact rules but there is no way a commercial driver in Europe would be allowed on the roads for those sorts of hours without sleep and with such inadequate breaks.

My point is they do not make these rules up for no good reason, whle you may think it is a challenge to do these endurance trips you are hazarding other road users if you do so with a sleep deficit.

If you want to push yourself - try climbing a mountain dressed as a bear or something!! :lol:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
When I was a trucker, the law was 15 hrs maximum on duty - no more than 10 of which could be logged behind the wheel, followed by 8 hrs off duty. That was 20 yrs ago, it may have changed since then.

There were also rules for maximum hrs in a 7 or 8 day period.

[/quote]
 
1 - 20 of 43 Posts
Top