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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Interesting demographic factoids .

:evil3: See chart , motorcycle / scooter ownership in the under 40 crowd nearly cut in half in just 2 decades .



It's not just motorcycles and scooters , believe it or not it's drivers licensees or lack there of in the very young . When I was 15 the most important thing to me was getting my drivers license on my 16th birthday .

Today ? Not so much ?

From AAA


WASHINGTON, D.C. (August 1, 2013) – The majority of American teens today delay getting a driver’s license, according to new study by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety. Less than half (44 percent) of teens obtain a driver’s license within 12 months of the minimum age for licensing in their state and just over half (54 percent) are licensed before their 18th birthday, causing concern among safety experts that young adult drivers are missing the benefits intended by graduated drivers licensing (GDL). These findings mark a significant drop from two decades ago when data showed more than two-thirds of teens were licensed by the time they turned 18.“With one in three teens waiting to get their license until they turn 18, there’s a segment of this generation missing opportunities to learn under the safeguards that GDL provides,” said Peter Kissinger, President and CEO, AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety. “For most, it’s about not having a car or having alternatives for getting around that are the top reasons cited for delaying what has traditionally been considered to be a rite of passage.”
Contrary to some expectations, survey results suggest that few teens wait until 18 simply to avoid graduated driver licensing. Instead, a number of other reasons for delaying licensure were cited, including:

44 percent – Did not have a car
39 percent – Could get around without driving
36 percent – Gas was too expensive
36 percent – Driving was too expensive
35 percent – “Just didn’t get around to it”

:dontknow: Who knew ?

TheReaper!
 

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Wow, this surprises me. I guess it must vary by location because here 90%+ of teens have a driver's license by the time they are 18. Of coarse NM isn't real strict with the teens, although it is a graduated license system. Also this is the west where things are few and far between and there is almost no public transportation. My boss lives about 20 miles out of town and so his kids have to have a car or get a ride to come into town if they want to do anything.

On the motorcycle ownership chart, the bigger shift was between 1990 and 1998. The exception to this is the 35-39 group, which dropped drastically between 1998 and 2003.
 

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Just wonder if this is indicative of a larger societal issue, one that has bothered me for years.

As a youngster, my mom would throw me out of the house. Go play, go do something, she'd tell me. I rode my bike everywhere, unfettered and unencumbered by worry. I explored and became very out going. Made me independent and unfearful of the world. Yes I got hurt, a lot. But nothing minor bandaging and neosporine couldn't fix.

No parent in their right mind, fearing child social services and a pedophilia paranoia, would do that nowadays. At least not in Los Angeles. Not going to comment on the correctness of it, just making the point.

But are the new generations becoming too fearful of things like exploring, MC riding, getting hurt, etc?
 

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Liam's... Good points.
 

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1. Money. If you believe that the medium income for the vast majority of American workers has not increased since the late 70's, then it's easy to understand that additional spending for cars, insurance, parking, gas & repairs simply isn't in the cards for millions of families. Even a kid with a part-time job can't come close to covering even a small percentage of the cost. (Almost 100 years ago Henry Ford realized it was beneficial to pay his workers enough so they could afford to buy the product they were building. I have no idea where today's executives think their customers are going to come from).

2. In large cities (where most people live), driving a car is simply not fun anymore. Whether cruisin' down the boulevard or hopping on the freeway, you're going nowhere fast. Drivers license? Why bother?

3. Technology. Video & online gaming; social networking; smartphones/texting. Virtual 'friendships' seem to be the new normal.

As far as motorcycles go - well, I didn't start riding until my early 50's. So there still hope. ;)
 

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However there is the other side of the coin - less teens driving{usually poorly and rather aggressively} can make the roads safer.
 

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It's the same, but slightly less so in the Uk. But this includes cars too not just bikes. It seems to be that folks in vast numbers over here spend money on University as soon as they leave school instead of getting a bike or car.
 

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It amazes me around here, teenagers driving Suburbans, pick-up truck's, Denali, etc at 18...Yes, some parent's own them, but most children will tell you it's their vehicle.

Crikey mate's...We had bicycles as teenagers, and a scooter made us feel like a king! lol
 
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