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Discussion Starter #1
cyclechamp1982 said:
I am now the proud owner of a 2005 Burgman 650, having "moved up" from a 2003 Silver Wing. In the less then 2 weeks that I have owned the bike I have put over 800 miles on it. So far, I really like it, but I do have a major complaint. The instrutment panel (actually, the clear shield over the panel) is slanted at such an angle that (IMHO) it is close to creating a dangerous situation. When the Sun is over my shoulder (morning and evening) there is a glare on that screen that is just like looking at the Sun! If I even glance at the instrument panel, I am momentarily blinded, followed by the bright flashes one gets after flash photography! When the Sun is from the front, then I see such a strong reflection of my helmet, that it obscures the panel. I would like to see Suzuki do something about this problem. After today's ride, I felt like writing the NTSB and alerting them to this problem before it causes a serious accident. The angle of the clear plastic shield should be changed so that the reflections don't hit the rider right in the face.

Jerry in FL
Jerry,

Welcome to BurgmanUSA.

I don't think they could possibly change the angle to work for all riders. It all depends on the rider's height. I have never encountered the glare that is bothering you. I haven't heard anyone else mention it before either - although that doesn't necessarily mean that there aren't other folks affected by it.

My problem with that instrument display is different. I am 6'6" tall so I am looking down at it at a steeper angle than most riders. When the sun shines on it from some angles, I can barely read the big speedometer numerals - and everything else on the display is unreadable. This happens fairly frequently, and when it does, it really makes me hate that whole foolish digital display concept. But shorter riders may never experience that problem.

Perhaps they could do something with the material that the panel is made of to suppress glare, which might resolve both of our problems.

I would love to see them ditch that whole concept and go back to conventional instrumentation such as the 400 and the SW have. There are others who love the "video arcade" dash - for me it simply doesn't work well.
 

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pauljo said:
...Perhaps they could do something with the material that the panel is made of to suppress glare, which might resolve both of our problems. ...
I seem to recall discussing this here last summer. I had problems early in the morning and late in the afternoon when the sun was low with glare from the screen, and I often have trouble with it "washing out" when I'm riding into the sun.

One idea would be to get one of those add-on computer monitor glare filters, cut it to size, and make some kind of mount that could be adjusted to different angles depending on conditions; rider height, sun angle, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
A lot of sunglasses are designed to filter UV and/or are polarized. May be the same thing - I'm no expert on sunglasses technology. But I do know that my sunglasses also filter LCD displays to a certain extent, which makes reading that instrument panel more difficult. In my car, I can just remove my sunglasses for a few seconds to make it easier to read the LCD clock. On the scooter, that is not possible when riding.

Again, I think the use of LCD technology for motorcycle/scooter displays is a very bad idea. It "wows" the "nintendo" generation in the showroom, but on the road, in various sunlight conditions, it does not work as well as conventional instrumentation.
 

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Pauljo has the best idea. Polarized glasses greatly reduce glare and reflected sunlight, which is exactly what you see bouncing off the dash. be SURE you're getting polarized sunglasses. The best way to tell is to hold a lens from one pair 90 degrees in front of a lens from another pair. At 90 degrees the two lenses should block out all the light.

It makes me wonder if anyone offers a polarized plastic snap-on shield replacement for open face helmets.

Dave B.
 

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While polarized glasses can reduce glare, they can make LCD displays harder to read, because LCD displays use polarization to work. Tilting your head to one side or the other may help during the time you need to see the instruments.

And no, polarization and UV filtering aren't the same thing, although all polarized glasses that I know of also filter UV (but not vice versa).
 

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I know there used to be in camera stores that catered to home darkrooms a matte clear spray available to make glossy photos flat.

Would this work?

Or how about a matte finish clear vinyl stick on?
 

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Seems to me that all the mat sprays and sheets are really kind of 'pebbled'. This leads to another problem of trying to keep them clean as they collect dust like crazy.
We used to use them on computer screens years ago and it was the dust problem that made us stop. Could be that things ahve improved but it is something to think about.
 

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lilleyen said:
I know there used to be in camera stores that catered to home darkrooms a matte clear spray available to make glossy photos flat. Or how about a matte finish clear vinyl stick on?
Sails said:
Seems to me that all the mat sprays and sheets are really kind of 'pebbled'. This leads to another problem of trying to keep them clean as they collect dust like crazy.
I think the removable glare filter could work, since you could remove it and wash it when needed.

They do reduce brightness and contrast somewhat, but in this application I don't think that would be a serious problem.

Hmmm. Maybe someone should do an experiment.

I know just the person. :D
 
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