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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Don't know if I'm explaining myself correctly....my question is whether an impact wrench can be used in the belt removing process versus the special tool that is mentioned in the service manual? Seems an impact wrench would be the simplest way of doing it. Opinions appreciated. Also useful in simply deglazing.
 

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You may use an impact wrench for undoing the nut for sure, but you have to know more what your doing when tightening it back.
 

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You need 75 ft.lbs to tighten the nut, so I would think not. If you have an impact already, why not get a 75 ft. Lb torque stick? I used one when I installed the 19 gram sliders a couple thousand miles ago. No problem yet, knock on wood.
 

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I think it may work, if it's overall long enough and the pins are long enough to hold.
 

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I made my own holder, which also works on the clutch nut. You need a torque wrench. Check Harbor Freight, I bought a 1/2 in and a 3/8 TW for $10 each. (Coupons).

Yes- it's OK to remove the 24mm nuts with an impact wrench.

NO- I would NOT tighten them with an impact wrench. Especially the variator nut, which is located at the end of the crankshaft. Woe to you who strip that one :(
And make sure the variator is seated before tightening the nut. Hold the halves of the variator together so the rollers (or sliders) don't fall out....
 

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Torque sticks work great, here's a link to a posting I made some time back...

How they work is in a later post in that thread--I'll repeat it here:

Torque sticks, and how they work, are at first glance a bit of an enigma; the best analogy that most people can relate to is the instance of trying to bang a nail into a cantilever supported (overhanging) board.

Many of us have had that experience, of trying to pound a nail into a poorly supported board, and reached the point where it does not matter how hard you hit the nail it will not go in any further. This is because the "springiness" of the board is absorbing all the energy and none is being delivered to the nail--torque sticks work the same way, but in a rotational (torque) manner.

What looks like a plain ol' socket extension is actually a specifically sized torque spring (this is why they have different body diameters) that at its design torque absorbs all the applied load in excess of its rating--bang on it (with an impact wrench) all you want, it will not deliver any more than its rated torque to the fastener. Astoundingly simple and entirely accurate until it deforms or breaks, both quite noticeable and rare failures.
 

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I have a homemade clutch/variator tool (made out of some leftover garage door opener parts!), as others do, but use the impact wrench for ease of removal when servicing the variator or clutch.

To put it all back together, however, I use my variator tool and a manual torque wrench. I would hate to inadvertently cross thread a nut a nut with a power tool.
 
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