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Discussion Starter #1
So I literally signed up for this Forum 10 minutes ago while working from home. So I'm working til midnight (3+ Hrs from now) and I plan on leaving first thing in the morning for a 2 hour trip to buy a 2006 Burgman. I'd usually to a lot of research but I just found out about this today and need help from those who already have the know how. I'm a first time Burgman owner, my current ride is a 08 Honda Reflex, 250 CC thus the upgrade. So my question is what should I be looking for tomorrow? The seller says it's in immaculate shape and I tend to believe him. It has less then 1,750 miles and the body looks to be in good shape. Any feedback please? What's the #1 thing I should look at? Feedback? Thx
 

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If you buy, will you be hauling it back instead of riding it? That's extremely low mileage for the age, which could be a little concerning, depending on how it was stored over the years. Good chance the tires are original - if so I wouldn't want to ride past the end of the block on them, regardless of how they look. If you'll have to buy new tires right away that should be considered in the sale price.

Make sure the engine starts and idles smoothly and accelerates well. Not sure if you can see the inside of the fuel tank through the filler, but wouldn't hurt to try and look in there for rust or corrosion. If it's been taken care of it should be in excellent physical condition with those miles. You'll probably have to do all the maintenance items like engine oil, coolant, brake fluid, and gear oil. Some hoses may need to be replaced.

If we know the model, there could be more specific advice.
 

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Most likely it's decent, but ...what he said...All fluids, probably tires, probably drain the gas tank. Ask about initial maintenance, probably a valve check in there or something, or should be.
If it's a 400 the valve check ain't tough to do (comparatively) if the 650 probably not a problem but a true PITA.

and yeah..what model?
 

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This sounds a bit like an impulse buy,,, remember your first wife ???
 
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We are in 2020, personally would not touch a Burgman 400 below 2008 or later and a Burgman 650 below 2009 or later. Beware of a bike that has extremely low mileage unless extremely credible explanation from owner as it may hold surprises !
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thank you for your speedy reply. The Burgman I’m looking at today is the 400cc regular model. The person I’m buying from bought the Scooter for his wife but she barely rode it and they kept it in the garage this whole time. So regardless of the way the tires look I should replace them?? Is that due to the age and possible rubber rot or something? Before buying new tires to replace ones that look to be in really good shape is there any way to tell if they definitely need replaced? I personally think it’s a golden find, I’ve been looking for about 4 months so this isn’t an impulse buy but I can I possibly pass up a scooter in Show Room Condition? The owner is 65 yr old female, purchased by her husband but she never really rode it. Well wish me luck, I’m about 10 miles away, I will post pics if I actually purchase it.
 

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Tire rubber dries out and the rubber gets harder making tires unsafe. If the bike has no regular maintenance record and items such as brake fluid have not been changed in the past few years safety dictates you change the brake fluid, for the small cost of engine filter and oil they should be replaced as well. Brake parts should be dismantled and lubricated to ensure perfect operation. Items such as rear drive belt should be inspected closely to ensure the rubber has not dried out and hardened, not fun when the belt lets go on you 150 miles from home. Battery should be tested properly, radiator coolant should be changed or at minimum at least tested. If you change tires may as well install new valve stems as well. If gas is old suggest it be siphoned out and replaced with fresh gas.
 

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There is a four-digit number stamped on the sidewall that contains the manufacture date, may be preceded by some letters. First two digits are the week number, 01-52, second two digits are the year. If they are original tires the second two digits will probably be 05 or 06. The traditional recommendation is to replace if they are 5-7 years old, regardless of tread condition. If they have been kept indoors away from sunlight, weather and pollutants, you have some leeway here, but I wouldn't ride on 14 year old tires, except maybe a slow ride down the street just to make sure everything works.

 

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As noted by others tires age out. Less so in areas like the PNW if stored indoors, but even that's not a guarantee of anytime.
My current burger's tires were about 7-8 years old when I bought it. The bike was lowish miles, and the tires looked OK.
Since they looked good and the ride was fine, I was waffling on replacing, & rode 'em a couple weeks, them noted that the rear was showing some crumbling in the rear, which the front was showing on close inspection as well.
Of course I replaced 'em immediately, it was already in the budget.
By the same token I have some mid-tread life tires on one of my lighter bikes the wife rides that are about 6 years the bike is seldom ridden vs. my year round on the other two, so odds are high that I'll end up replacing 'em before a proposed multi-day trip, but for now they seem to be holding up.
The point of this post is that when tires get old, 5 years +, they can be OK, but be ready to replace 'em, & I don't recommend long trips on 'em unless you have replacements lined up.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Yes I did, the kill switch was a big concern but ended up being only a convenient battery disconnect since the bike was often stored for long periods of time. I completely flushed all liquids, cleaned brake parts, spark plugs and filters all around. I have new tires also but the old ones are still on there, waiting for the son to swap em at work. The scooter has been showing some rough idling and I can't figure that out but it doesn't seem to be major so I'm enjoying my ride. I was initially skeptical due to it only having 1,500 miles but I ended up making the right decision.
 

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take your laptop to the throne room and research the fuel tank problems on the 400, you may be getting a bit of gunk from rust in the tank , hopefully not, rough idle is not one of the major symptoms, but it could be part of it.
 

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take your laptop to the throne room and research the fuel tank problems on the 400, you may be getting a bit of gunk from rust in the tank , hopefully not, rough idle is not one of the major symptoms, but it could be part of it.
I'll look at the Manual and see if there's a fuel filter as well and change that, didn't think of that,, thx.
 

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Carl, the only filter is on the fuel pump assembly inside the tank. Item #5 here

Here's my adventure from 2018 with a very low milage 07 B400. Fuel starvation low power/will not rev above 6k RPM

I had a similar situation with my 07 B400, bike was originally purchased for the wife to ride and didn't. It had 363 miles on it when I bought it. It had basically sat in the garage for 11 years. It was "showroom" condition all except for the inside of the fuel tank. Since replacing the fuel tank, it's been a great bike. Turned 13,000 miles on it yesterday.

THIS LINK will be quite helpful, specifically page 181, section 5-8. Remember to save the pdf
 
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