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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If someone borrowed it and dropped it, where does it take the hit? Looks like that plastic panel under the footboards would get skinned up for sure. Do they stop at that point, or keep going? If the mirror takes a hit, does that mean the retraction mechanism can be damaged? I guess I'm asking how much it costs to drop one. At first it seemed like a low center of gravity and not likely to go down, but I notice when the steering gets close to lock it requires care.

Of course, I would never drop one, but what if someone else did?
 

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Floorboards, grab handles, front bodyside, and mirrors if it you can't stop it. $$$$
 

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Once the mirror folds up/breaks off, it lays completely flat on its side, resting on a nearly unbroken line from the top corner of the small glove box to the rear edge of the passenger's footboard.

If any part of you gets trapped underneath, a big chunk of the scooter's weight rests on that body part, in my case my luckily boot covered ankle, which I was completely unable to retract without help from a helper, who heard me honking the horn and came to rescue.

Full story: http://burgmanusa.com/forums/22-road-stories/48022-crashed-trapped.html

 

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So far, I've dumped my 650 gently to the left twice while not moving. It seemed to land on the center-stand foot which kept everything else from being damaged. I think it would have been a different story if I had been moving or if I had dumped it to the right.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yikes,

Scary story. If that ever happens to me I'll try to remember to lift the legs I had a couple moments pulling into my driveway when it felt like it could go down, but I realized I was using front brake only. I noticed on the Burgman and a Silver Wing I rode that the rear brake is more effective than on most motorcycles I've ridden. I plan to try using the rear brake much of the time, with front brake in the last few feet of stopping or in emergencies.

It also looks like stop-and-go should be a lot less physically demanding on a scooter.
 

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Oh - please don't - the front stoppers are fantastic on the 650 especially with ABS - they are the main line of defence.
You've got it completely backwards..

The rear brake is useful but does not have stopping power.

WHere you need care with the front brake is in very slow manuevers...it will torque over instantly with a turned wheel at slow speed.
THAT is where the rear brake is very good and also a bit for standing the bike up a bit in the twists if you are offline a bit.

The front brakes in twists can make the tires howl coming into a corner and then accelerate out using the Power button.

Front brakes in slow maneuvers are problematic on all bikes.

One thing to watch out for with the Burgman if you are going slowly downhill on engine braking the CVT will release at a certain speed and you'll find yourself with 600 lb of bike freewheeling rather rapidly....this is where feathering the rear brake keeps you out of trouble while turning slowly.

Easy rear brake use at slow speed and coming to a stop makes it smooth.

Front brakes are the main anchors especially in an emergency where the rear may lock up if applied hard.
All the weight is on the front and the traction and stopping power is on the front.
Needs to be used that way.
 

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If someone borrowed it and dropped it, where does it take the hit? Looks like that plastic panel under the footboards would get skinned up for sure. Do they stop at that point, or keep going? If the mirror takes a hit, does that mean the retraction mechanism can be damaged? I guess I'm asking how much it costs to drop one. At first it seemed like a low center of gravity and not likely to go down, but I notice when the steering gets close to lock it requires care.

Of course, I would never drop one, but what if someone else did?
Me always say never happen to me also, me drop 2 times now.

As you say in USA, never say never !
 

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but I notice when the steering gets close to lock it requires care.
exactly and that's where feathering the rear brake against a little bit of throttle and staying off the front brake will keep you upright.
Those front binders are excellent and that works against you in slow maneuvers...
 

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I'd be very careful lending it as many riders have difficulty with the engine braking at low speed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Oh - please don't - the front stoppers are fantastic on the 650 especially with ABS - they are the main line of defence.
You've got it completely backwards..

The rear brake is useful but does not have stopping power.

WHere you need care with the front brake is in very slow manuevers...it will torque over instantly with a turned wheel at slow speed.
THAT is where the rear brake is very good and also a bit for standing the bike up a bit in the twists if you are offline a bit.

The front brakes in twists can make the tires howl coming into a corner and then accelerate out using the Power button.

Front brakes in slow maneuvers are problematic on all bikes.

One thing to watch out for with the Burgman if you are going slowly downhill on engine braking the CVT will release at a certain speed and you'll find yourself with 600 lb of bike freewheeling rather rapidly....this is where feathering the rear brake keeps you out of trouble while turning slowly.

Easy rear brake use at slow speed and coming to a stop makes it smooth.

Front brakes are the main anchors especially in an emergency where the rear may lock up if applied hard.
All the weight is on the front and the traction and stopping power is on the front.
Needs to be used that way.
I didn't explain that well. The front brake will be used in every stop except perhaps for low-speed maneuvers. I know the front brake is the main stopper, but I do notice that the rear brake seems to have more effect on scooters, probably because of the weight on the rear wheel. I guess I just plan to use the rear brake more, in coordination with the front. And of course the front will be my primary whenever I need quick stopping or diving into a corner. Contrary to MSF dogma, I always cover the front brake so it's there instantly if needed. That alone kept me from bagging two deer in NC a few years ago.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I'd be very careful lending it as many riders have difficulty with the engine braking at low speed.
;)I was being facetious. If anyone drops it, it will be me and it wouldn't be the first time I let one get away from me.
 

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So far, I've dumped my 650 gently to the left twice while not moving. It seemed to land on the center-stand foot which kept everything else from being damaged. I think it would have been a different story if I had been moving or if I had dumped it to the right.
+1 exactly my experience

However as mjr says, don't try and stop it just help it down gently. I tried to stop and I did myself all sorts of injury , And getting it back up EASY ! With all the adrenaline pumping :eek:
 

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My mechanic dropped my 400, sctratched the windshield and took out the muffler guard.

Dropped the 650 on the left side from a small tap from another rider and scratched the front faring, broke the brake lever and turn signal lens.

Worse was a slow speed low side slide on the right. Scratched the lower panel, front faring and mirror, dented the muffler guard.

What's a proper MC without a few battle scars? Still runs fine.
 

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The biggest heart break of it going down is the expense of the Suzuki parts! The second is dealing with all the weight getting it back up although the adrenaline does do wonders!!Mark
 

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You can pretty well expect that some part of every thing on that side will get scratched if it falls completely over . I've bought and sold or flipped a lot of bikes over the years and I'm always amazed at the damage people do to these scooters .

Recently I saw an ad on Craigslist for a 650 Burg with like 1700 miles on it , it was from a dealer about 50 miles away . The ad said some scratches so I emailed them and asked for close up pics . As god as my witness there wasn't any thing on this scooter that wasn't gouged ,scraped or cracked . Even the front up high on the windshield . It was almost as if some one walked around the entire scooter with a high powered electric sander on a mission of revenge .

Be careful , plastics for these scoots are EXPENSIVE !

TheReaper!
 

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Years ago I was riding on my '03 in a parking lot, jammed on the brakes, and turned the handlers hard right. The bike suddenly lurched over and before you realize it all the weight surprises you. It went down but luckily I was able to stop it from completely going over but man it was heavy. It scraped the right lower painted panel in front/back where the footrests are, the triangular shield on the front of the muffler, and the removable shield on the muffler.
 

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I had a lady show up at a ride on a Silverwing she had no business riding as she was a newbie. After she dropped it while parking, she said I must strong because it took two guys to get it up last time. Last time?

When I said the bent brake lever could be replaced, she said she was used to it as its been bent from the drop before the last one. (That's three drops if your counting).

Finally she said the scratches were from the first time she dropped it. That's four times and she hadn't ridden it that much. She also said she had been kicked out of the MSF course and a private instructor dumped her as well.

I suggested she look for another hobby. Some just weren't meant to ride.
 

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Years ago I was riding on my '03 in a parking lot, jammed on the brakes, and turned the handlers hard right. The bike suddenly lurched over and before you realize it all the weight surprises you. It went down but luckily I was able to stop it from completely going over but man it was heavy. It scraped the right lower painted panel in front/back where the footrests are, the triangular shield on the front of the muffler, and the removable shield on the muffler.
YUP ! If you have your front wheel turned while braking hard it will SUCK you right into the pavement . That was one of the things I covered extensively when I was teaching my son to ride .

This girl tried to look cool and come to a slide after this little contest . While it's hard to see she turned into her stop to try and get that rear tire to slide out behind her, like we did as kids with our bicycles . But as you can see she was SUCKED into the pavement . I'll bet she'll never try that again ?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P1BZmpp-YLE&list=FLFpmvfyHnFqTyigpxW839cg&index=15



TheReaper!
 

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I didn't explain that well. The front brake will be used in every stop except perhaps for low-speed maneuvers. I know the front brake is the main stopper, but I do notice that the rear brake seems to have more effect on scooters, probably because of the weight on the rear wheel. I guess I just plan to use the rear brake more, in coordination with the front. And of course the front will be my primary whenever I need quick stopping or diving into a corner. Contrary to MSF dogma, I always cover the front brake so it's there instantly if needed. That alone kept me from bagging two deer in NC a few years ago.
you got it - had me worried there....;)

On the other hand we have some riders on GTAM site that seem to think they should avoid the rear brake entirely......not quite as risky but first time they hit some gravel they'll be SOL.

The Burgman 650 is actually okay on dirt - even on the occasion rocky streambeds thanks to my buddy's misinformed GPS.





those be rocks not leaves....had to call on some rusty scrambling skills. Low CofG

and yes the rear brake was very useful.
 

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YUP ! If you have your front wheel turned while braking hard it will SUCK you right into the pavement .
Well that's different from what I did. The front brake didn't lock up, I nearly stopped in a straight line then turned the handlebars and it tipped over, lol.

The Burgman 650 is actually okay on dirt - even on the occasion rocky streambeds thanks to my buddy's misinformed GPS.
Not so good on desert washboards.
 
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