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Discussion Starter #1
When I swapped to my new OEM clutch I noticed the the clutch bell housing had many ridges inside.
So I took my Dremel with angled grinding stone attachment and ground all the ridges down to the lowest common point to make it all nice and shiny again.
Then I used the Dremel sanding bit to smooth it up some more.
Then I used some 1000 grit sandpaper I had lying around to hand sand it all down to a nice smooth finish. Until my arm got tired really.

End result: Super smooth engagement now vs. the grabbing that I had before the new clutch and my grinding and sanding.
 

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1000 grit?
I used 150 grit only and just did it by hand. I didn't get the big ridges out, but it sure is a lot smoother engaging now. I used 220 on the clutch pads.
I've got no "judder" at all now.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Yep 1000. It was what I had on hand at the time. Lots of extra work with that fine of a paper so I guess I wouldn't recommend that to others. :)
220 sounds good on the pads for a normal deglazing.
 

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Good work! I am fortunate to have a metal lathe and have not done hand work like that in years...

One comment¹--it's a clutch bell (a bell-shaped active component). A bell housing (a bell-shaped housing enclosing active components) is a completely different thing:





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¹ - See what happens when engineers retire and have too much spare time.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Is it working ok? No slipping or judder?
Yep smooth as a babies bottom.
I don't know how long I've been living with the take off judder but man I sure feel how it was when it was new again now.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Mmmm metal lathe. [Drool]
Hehe I know what you mean Cliff I have engineer friends and man oh man do you have to be precise when talking to them!
 

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Mine had the judders ever since I bought it about 5 months ago. The PO told me it did it since new. He also said he took to the dealer and told him that's how it's supposed be.
After reading some of stories here, I believe him.
Funny though how someone with no special tools or manual and access to this site can take it apart, put it back together and it runs like someone that just just drank a bottle of "Go Lightly" What a bunch of false advertising is on that bottle!
 

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Looking to try a new bell to extend clutch service intervals. Currently have an OEM which is normal color, i.e. not blue, but getting polished to a mirror touch surface pretty fast. Aware of proper technique for blipping the throttle, cooling variator, and deglazing the shoes.

So it looks like there're three major options in the market:

** Polini **

** Dr Pulley **

** Malossi **


Somehow as seen from the pics Polini uses significantly less material in their product. It's also the most rare item in the shops. I tried to find a fault in this design but was not able to. But maybe I'm missing something. So is that really a step up from the rest or it still has its trade-off?
 

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The POLINI appears to be the lightest
of the three...a welded center hub,
instead of the 6 rivets.
Very nice welding, by the way.
I believe that the ribs around the
outside help with cooling.
 

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You think others made it thick for no reason? It seems to me that way, but i'm not an engineer.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
a reason

A reason that I can think of is that the extra mass helps with the flywheel effect when coasting maybe?
Also more mass means more heat dissipation doesn't it?
 

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Bigger inertia, smoother ride that is? Yeah, a larger mass bell can handle heat better and therefore preserve the form longer without being distorted. But the lighter one could be made to prevent heat generation instead of managing it?
 

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I thnk Boltzen is more on track...not for the inertia but, for the fact the extra mass. It would get rid of the heat slower but, the mass can take more without distorting. On the other hand, the lighter design would lilely more easily warp IF it got as hot however, the design would also appear to more quickly dissipate heat to the air and thus, keep it cooler in the first place.
 

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To be honest, in my experimentation, I don't think it's the heat that's the main problem or that causes the judder problem. It's the dust. All dry clutches become a little warm and glazed too, but if they are not having to deal with lots of dust (and the Burgman clutch does get very dusty over time), it's not really a problem. The Polini lets the dust out much more easily than the standard type bell. So from what I hear from those that have used them, it is better than the standard bell because the tranny fan can blow the dust away more easily. Make sure to keep the tranny air filter clean so the air gets through at maximum level. The thinner bell dissipates heat away more easily being easier to cool. But I haven't used it myself so I cannot confirm that. I can say that I do not have the judder after running near 10k miles with my standard bell in all sorts of heavy traffic conditions because I use the right move off technique, I don't baby it even in stop start conditions and the clutch is just fine and working like it should. To get this it depends on how you do the maintenance. When I cleaned and deglazed last time I used 80 grit on the pads and made sure I kept the working surfaces of the clutch pads nice and smooth and FLAT in the cross plane using a small sanding block to do the job. Be gentle when you do this. If you use your fingers to hold the sanding paper you will almost certainly introduce uneven sanding patterns to the shoes. The shoes are very soft and sensitive to unevenness that you may not even notice when you do the job. Uneveness traps more dust and eventually causes ridges in the bell. Your judder will return quite quickly if that's the case. Using the sanding block is one of the most important things to do when you carry out clutch maintenance. I've posted about it on here before somewhere with pics and it's a bit more informative. If you go for the Polini, post back with how you get on with it. I've not found it neccasary to go for that nor have any of my customers since I've been getting the clutch shoes nice and flat. It seems to cure the issue along with the right moving off technique.
 

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Hi, Mech -- yes, I'm sanding pads very carefully using block and am not babying the throttle at take-offs. Besides leaving bike on side stand to let the cvt cool and dust sediment the right way. However the bell gets evenly polished just after a couple hundred miles. At the same time shoe pads start glazing also very uniformly along the entire surface. Thinking of loose tolerances now.
 

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I read about the sanding block too late, I used my fingers, so in a way, I'm happy, that gives me hope that when I do it next, here in the near future, it'll last more then 500 miles.
Thank you much Quantum mech, I really do appreciate and trust your input!
Mike.
 

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So change the bell i did. To Polini Evolution. the cover bearing wouldn't slide on easily, so i guess next time i remove the cover it will stay on the shaft. Initial test not quite what was expected. After the OEM the start off rpm climbed very high -- up to 5.500, but what's weird, the initial torque is lost. Bike is unwilling to pick speed from 0 up. Just revving engine with no clutch grab. Once underway, it holds speed fine.

The difference in bell weights is more than 600 g. The aftermarket clutch i'm using has two sets of springs. I guess everyone knows the brand. However it would be strange if spring weights made that difference. According to manufacturer the initial clutch engagement should have changed from 1220 rpm for the 12.5 kg blue springs to 1350 for the 16.5 kg yellow that are currently installed. The second set of pillow springs was changed from 10 kg red to 12.5 blue which worked just fine with the OEM bell. So where does the slip come from, maybe it's the belt? But i doubt it.
 

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Updates. After 60 km revised the clutch again. Surely enough, new Polini bell proved too tight for the bearing so the latter stayed on the shaft for the first time, despite abundance of grease. Seems with this manufacturer tolerance is a bit on the bigger side.

The contact surface got spotted which likely indicates higher temperature due to excessive slippage (earlier post).



However the OEM bell worked perfectly with the same clutch spring combination, although got mirror polished just after a couple of miles:


So possibly dimming the bell is not worth it, since it lasts not too long.

Next comes the Malossi bell. The picture posted earlier does not correspond to apparently a new design, but i left it for comparison anyways. Actually a new one looks not that plain dull:



Now some weights. The lightest one as was expected from the pictures proved to be Polini:



The heaviest one is certainly the original bell, think it can easily be used in a truck or military industry. Literally a bulletproof product (unfortunately my little scale didn't take it, but it's not much over 2000 g -- that's for sure :)):



Approximately with same difference between the two, in the middle is the Malossi bell:



All three manufacturers use different alloys for their product too.
So with new softer springs in the clutch, the new Malossi bell is installed. Fit was better. 40 km in city traffic -- so far so good.
 
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