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Discussion Starter #1
I want SUZUKI BURGMAN 400 K3-K6 MODELS POLINI DOUBLE TOOTHED KEVLAR DRIVE BELT

But, don't want to pay 200 for a belt. Is Kevlar worth it? I want the best bang for buck belt. Please, I really am lost.
 

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Hi there.
Look for the user "borrozzinomoto" on Ebay. I got a Kevlar belt from this guy. Seems reasonable too!
Good luck..
:thumbup:
 

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I've got an 03 and the stock OEM belt is under $93 from cheapcycleparts.com. I get plenty of mileage out of it. Why change?
My guess is that ths may be your first belt change - if that's the case, 20K is dang good.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
To what I know, it the first one. It's at 21000 now, and now, I also want to replace the weights and rollers. No idea on that either.
 

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GK13 said:
To what I know, it the first one. It's at 21000 now, and now, I also want to replace the weights and rollers. No idea on that either.
If you got 21,000 out of the first belt, I'd just go with OEM - that puts you to 42,000 before you have to change your belt again.
As far as rollers, there's a lot of debate. I've only used rollers and am on my third set. The first set was changed at @ 14K and they were pretty beat up. The next set (OEMs) was changed at @25K and they made the first set look good. I've since bought an addtional movable faceplate and modified the edges so as to not chew up the rollers (apparently an issue on the early 400s). I also replaced the rollers with DR roller weights (their sliders are VERY popular here).
The modification to the faceplate caused a loss of @400 rpms at an indicated 70 mph so I'm not really happy with that - aside form the better acceleration. I may try the 21 grams weights or try the sliders (I currently have the 20 gram weights in - stock I believe are 18 or 19 grams).
Do some looking around here - there is a lot of information on the DR sliders as well as the modifications to the movable faceplate. BTW, I still have the original in its original condition - I bought another to modify.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I know there are the round pins, and the round weights. What do they do, and what can I change about them to do what. Also, I know there is a small air filter on top of the cvt case. It says don't clean with water or oil. How do I clean that?
 

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The stock belt is Kevlar¹, I.e. it has a backbone of aramid fiber, on a new belt you can see it as the yellowish band just below the rubber outer backing. Malossi and others just advertise it to make there belts sound superior.

¹ - Kevlar is Dupont's trade name for one of its aramid fiber products. Aramid backbones are used in most all modern poly-V, cogged, CVT, etc. belts as it has very high tensile strength and is very low stretch, allowing the backbone layer to be thinner and therefore more compliant. This causes it to generate less heat--the mortal enemy of "rubber" drive belts.
 

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I have heard of several failures of eBay bought generic belts.
Let the Buyer beware! :wink:
 

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GK13 said:
I know there are the round pins, and the round weights. What do they do, and what can I change about them to do what.
The rollers are weights that move up ramps in the variator. Centripetal force is what causes them to move as the variator turns faster. The movement of the weights up the ramp force the faces of the primary pulley apart. As the primary pulley moves apart the belt slacks. This allows springs in the secondary pulley to pull it's faces together. What all this does is change the gear ratio of the CVT from a low starting off ratio to a high crusing ratio. The CVT is shifting from low gear to high gear.

Changing the weight of the rollers changes their mass and thus how fast or slow they move up the ramps. Since the weights are working against a contra spring it can also change how far they move up the ramp. This changes how fast or slow the CVT shifts ratios and possibly the highest ratio you can reach. You can use this to tailor the shifting characteristics of your scoot to match your preferences.

Lighter weights allow the CVT to stay in a lower ratio for a longer time so you can accelerate faster. Heavier weights shift the CVT to a higher ratio faster. This slows acceleration but might help fuel mileage. If you go to light on the weights the CVT may never reach it's highest ratio so your engine rpm will be higher when you are running on the highway. If you get the weights to heavy the CVT may up shift to fast so the engine is struggling to get the bike up to speed.

If you like the way your CVT shifts now then stay with the stock weight rollers.
 

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The rollers are weights that move up ramps in the variator. Centripetal force is what causes them to move as the variator turns faster. The movement of the weights up the ramp force the faces of the primary pulley apart. As the primary pulley moves apart the belt slacks. This allows springs in the secondary pulley to pull it's faces together. What all this does is change the gear ratio of the CVT from a low starting off ratio to a high crusing ratio. The CVT is shifting from low gear to high gear.

Changing the weight of the rollers changes their mass and thus how fast or slow they move up the ramps. Since the weights are working against a contra spring it can also change how far they move up the ramp. This changes how fast or slow the CVT shifts ratios and possibly the highest ratio you can reach. You can use this to tailor the shifting characteristics of your scoot to match your preferences.

Lighter weights allow the CVT to stay in a lower ratio for a longer time so you can accelerate faster. Heavier weights shift the CVT to a higher ratio faster. This slows acceleration but might help fuel mileage. If you go to light on the weights the CVT may never reach it's highest ratio so your engine rpm will be higher when you are running on the highway. If you get the weights to heavy the CVT may up shift to fast so the engine is struggling to get the bike up to speed.

If you like the way your CVT shifts now then stay with the stock weight rollers.


Thanks for the awesome explanation,,,
 

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I think we are both looking for the same thing...

cheapmotorcycleparts.com has the belt (27601-15F10) at $107, now.

so far best I can see the stock belt at $95 and stock rollers at $10.99 x 8 at partzilla.com

if anybody knows a current better price, please advise.
 

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I assume you already bought a belt & rollers for your AN400. Where did you end up getting them? How long did it take you? Any issues? I need to do the same thing to my '06 400 which has 31K on the clock. I'm 3rd owner and it wasn't well maintained. Getting caught up now.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I found a cheap belt that was to spec on eBay. Been debating biting the bullet and buying the 20 gram sliders, but still not sure about getting those verse just getting the round weights. Idk tho.
 

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Go for the sliders, you'll never regret it. IMHO
 
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