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Discussion Starter #1
Came to a stop at a stop sign. The road was slanted quite a bit to the right. My Burgie suffered just a few minor scratches. Most of the damage was feeling dumb and embarrassed.

Any tips on how to avoid a repeat performance?

Using the technique taught in MSF I had no problem picking up the bike.
 

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Bob,

I had a close call today under the same circumstances. What is the technique taught in MSF for picking up the Bike? They did not cover that when I took the course...
 

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Discussion Starter #4
JohnnyDeath said:
Bob,

I had a close call today under the same circumstances. What is the technique taught in MSF for picking up the Bike? They did not cover that when I took the course...
It's basically the same technique shown at the link Norman posted except MSF didn't mention putting the sidestand down which is an excellent idea.
Here's Norman's link again.

http://www.msgroup.org/TIP075.html
 

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thanks
 

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BobG said:
Came to a stop at a stop sign. The road was slanted quite a bit to the right....Any tips on how to avoid a repeat performance?
Practice. That's about it. As you get more of a feel for the Burgman you'll be more stable at stops without thinking too much about it.

Mainly, if the road is slanted you'll need to tilt slightly toward the uphill side as you roll toward the stop, and take more weight on the uphill leg when you actually stop.

If you try to balance 50/50 on both legs you'll be leaning down hill, and over you'll go. That's probably what happened to you, right?

The same sort of thing applies when parking on a slope. If the surface slopes steeply to the right and you put it on the sidestand it might still be leaning to the right. Crunch! Better to turn the bike around, or better yet face it up slope (and best is to seek nearby level ground).
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Brian said:
BobG said:
Came to a stop at a stop sign. The road was slanted quite a bit to the right....Any tips on how to avoid a repeat performance?
Practice. That's about it. As you get more of a feel for the Burgman you'll be more stable at stops without thinking too much about it.

Mainly, if the road is slanted you'll need to tilt slightly toward the uphill side as you roll toward the stop, and take more weight on the uphill leg when you actually stop.

If you try to balance 50/50 on both legs you'll be leaning down hill, and over you'll go. That's probably what happened to you, right?

The same sort of thing applies when parking on a slope. If the surface slopes steeply to the right and you put it on the sidestand it might still be leaning to the right. Crunch! Better to turn the bike around, or better yet face it up slope (and best is to seek nearby level ground).
Hi Brian,

Thanks for your response.

Trying to balance 50/50 on both legs is exactly what happened to me.

What is the correct way to "tilt slightly toward the uphill side as you roll toward the stop"?
 

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BobG said:
...Trying to balance 50/50 on both legs is exactly what happened to me.

What is the correct way to "tilt slightly toward the uphill side as you roll toward the stop"?
As you're arriving at the stop line, just before you are actually stopped, just lean a bit. It doesn't take much, just a tilt of the head or a slight shift of the upper body. Once you're thinking about doing it, it'll sorta just happen. Even just putting out the leg on the uphill side will do it.

You can also try practicing on level stops; at one stop try leaning left and balancing only on the left leg with the right foot on the floorboards, at the next stop keep the left foot on the floorboards and rest on the right leg, etc. You'll build up your leg muscles a bit while you're riding; not a bad way to get a little exercise, eh?

Keep in mind that it's only a slight lean; just enough to keep the bike from tipping the other way. Too much lean and you'll suddenly be trying to hold up several hundred pounds of bike on one leg.

HTH.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Brian said:
BobG said:
...Trying to balance 50/50 on both legs is exactly what happened to me.

What is the correct way to "tilt slightly toward the uphill side as you roll toward the stop"?
As you're arriving at the stop line, just before you are actually stopped, just lean a bit. It doesn't take much, just a tilt of the head or a slight shift of the upper body. Once you're thinking about doing it, it'll sorta just happen. Even just putting out the leg on the uphill side will do it.

You can also try practicing on level stops; at one stop try leaning left and balancing only on the left leg with the right foot on the floorboards, at the next stop keep the left foot on the floorboards and rest on the right leg, etc. You'll build up your leg muscles a bit while you're riding; not a bad way to get a little exercise, eh?

Keep in mind that it's only a slight lean; just enough to keep the bike from tipping the other way. Too much lean and you'll suddenly be trying to hold up several hundred pounds of bike on one leg.

HTH.
Thanks again Brian!
 

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There's also a bit of timing involved in making sure that you plant your feet to support the bike at the same time that you put the final squeeze on the brakes to stop it.



Peace.
 

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Bleeder said:
There's also a bit of timing involved in making sure that you plant your feet to support the bike at the same time that you put the final squeeze on the brakes to stop it...
That's true. When I first started riding again it took me a while to get my timing back. I think I wore off about 1/8th of an inch of the soles on my shoes dragging then along the ground when I had bled off too much speed to balance with my feet up, but wasn't yet up at the stop line. Very embarassing. :oops:

There's just no substitute for practice.
 

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I also think about keeping the bars square with the scoot whenever I stop. Dropped my big BMW 3 times because the bars went full left or right as I was stopping. Now I won't even think about stopping unless I can get the bars squared up. If it calls for a little duck walk, so be it.

Carl
 

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sorry to hear you dropped it ...I am always gutted when that first drop happens .....I am not going to say mine has stayed upright so far!!!! in case I tempt the gods :lol:
have just read about how to pick up the goldwing and sounds great to me will try and muster the confidence to go outside and lay mine down to have a practise.. cos with the weight of the burgman it certainly seems a daunting task
debs
 

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Discussion Starter #15
debs said:
sorry to hear you dropped it ...I am always gutted when that first drop happens .....I am not going to say mine has stayed upright so far!!!! in case I tempt the gods :lol:
have just read about how to pick up the goldwing and sounds great to me will try and muster the confidence to go outside and lay mine down to have a practise.. cos with the weight of the burgman it certainly seems a daunting task
debs
Thanks.

Is there an 8 month time difference between New Zealand and the U.S. east coast? :lol:
 

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BobG said:
...Is there an 8 month time difference between New Zealand and the U.S. east coast? :lol:
:lol: :lol: :lol:

I see this happening a lot. At another forum I belonged to (currently down for unknown reasons) we'd get topics comming back after years! Usually it was someone who did a keyword search on Google or something, and sometimes it was someone doing a search in the fora themselves.

It's kind of fun, sometimes, to see old topics come up. It's kind of like going to a high school reunion and looking at old photos. "Oh yeah. I remember that now."

:)
 

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The above posts cover it well, I would list 3 items as the main key
1 - Practice looking were you indent to stop, don't stare or focus just a quick look
2 - learn to grab that front brake to stop your self, slow speed rolls to stop do not work
3 - Slow speed riding so you can control your bike and balance at under 6 mpg
Practice all that and you should not have any trouble. :)

Now let be go pick up my bike :oops:
 

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I would like to share with everyone that the technique that James Davis talked about absolutely does work. I am 140 lbs give or take a few and picked up a humongous gold wing that was lying on its side. It was not easy but using that technique I was able to actually pick the bike up and I did not flip over to the other side when I did. :lol:

I almost dropped my 400 the other day cause dodo bird forgot to put the kickstand down. :roll: My shoulders and back felt that load trying to keep it from falling all the way down. Thank God it was not a 650 as I doubt I would have been able to hold it up.
 

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Hi Bob.
Glad to hear you're ok. Like mentioned above, practice coming to gentle smooth stops keeping your front wheel straight. If the front wheel is turned even slightly to the left or right, the bike will tend to lean (or fall) in that direction when you stop, especially if you squeeze or grab the front brake too hard or too quickly.
Don't stick out your foot (or feet) too soon. There's a danger you could snag your sole on a rough spot or pothole and cause you to lose your balance. You're only putting your foot out to support the bike when it stops. Don't use your feet as brakes. Just put your foot out as the bike stops to hold the bike up.
Normally, in the MSF classes, we teach students to use their left foot to support a regular motorcycle at stops. The right foot should remain on the brake pedal to hold the bike at the stop (in 1st gear) and the right hand on the throttle just in case you should suddenly have to accelerate to get out of harms way. On our Burgmans I guess it doesn't really matter which foot you use (or if you even use both). Just put your foot out at the final moment before you stop and lean your body slightly in that direction.
Remember, smooth and gentle - not quick and hard is the key to normal stops. And, keep that front wheel straight and watch the road surface.
Hope this helps.

Don
 

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I keep more to the center crown of the road, when the slope is steep. The toughest thing I have found is a road with a steep right angle and I am trying to make a tight right turn at a stop sign. I hold the brake rev it up and ease the brake off.
 
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