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Never had new but both 650s got smoother over time up to about 12k miles.
Both of mine had less than 2,000 miles on them when bought.

WOuld help if we knew which Burgman ;)
 

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It's strictly a mileage thing. Once you have 1k on the clock things should be pretty well seated. Take it easy the first 600, then increase the top speed a little bit more every 100 miles after that. Once you hit 1k you can ride it at reasonably high feeeway speeds. After 2k, you should be all broken in for sure. I doubt you will feel much difference.

As MacDoc said, it'll loosen up a bit and get smoother and a little faster as the miles accumulate.
 

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I doubt you will feel much difference.
Oh, the difference is there, trust me. After some accrued mileage i can do 90 mph stretches ind. quite easily. Before that, going at such speeds would have prob knocked all my teeth out. :)
 

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Oh, the difference is there, trust me. After some accrued mileage i can do 90 mph stretches ind. quite easily. Before that, going at such speeds would have prob knocked all my teeth out. :)
Very true. My 400 has 42k and runs better and faster than ever. But it is a very gradual thing. Not like one day its not there one day and the next it is.
 

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Yeah...mine too! The engine was very tight for the first 500 miles then it really started to loosen. After the initial running in was completed at 1500 miles I treated it completely normally. It was getting faster and faster and power was increasing almost everyday. I dynoed it at 2000 miles (at work on our inertia dyno) and it was producing a mean average from two runs of 25.2ps at the rear wheel. At 5000 miles that went up steeply to a mean of 26.8ps at the rear wheel. By 10000 miles that was 27.5 ps at the rear wheel using fully synthetic oil which does help release more power. Torque was of course up by equal amounts as that's how the machine calculates. Max power was calculated at 34.6ps at the crank. But the biggest improvement was the way the power was delivered. Torque was not only more but was coming in much earlier at lower revs than when the bike was only at 2000 miles. I ran my bike in using the standard book method, not a fast run in. That give the engine more time to properly conform over several thousands of miles unlike fast run in techniques. My bike uses no oil whatsoever. All this indicates how fairly efficient the CVT system is on the 400's as power losses are minimal. It's much more efficient than some suggest.
 

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Yes, the final drive ratio was lowered slightly to give better pickup and lighten load on the clutch. A better cooling system for the transmission was installed to blow more and cleaner air through the tranny. A more robust clutch was fitted (5 shoe instead of 3 shoe) to spread the heat and load on the clutch pads. In addition late 2009/10 onwards models have a different piston which has a stronger wider top compression ring to dissipate heat better and prevent piston flutter at high revs. The ecu was remapped too to take advantage of all this stuff. This enables the engineers to set the rev limiter higher and place the redline at 8950rpm instead of the earlier 2007/8/9 bikes 8500rpm. This compensates for the lower final drive ratio. So you get better acceleration on the later bikes without loss of top speed, yet retaining superb fuel economy.
 

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Also, if your tacho says 8950rpm redline, it's the latest spec. Earlier models with 8500rpm redline don't have all the specs.
 

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What might I feel (and when) as the miles are put on ?... I've been careful to vary the speed & vary the load.
At 1000 miles, my clutch started to judder and the bike would shake a bit when moving from rest. I read that this problem is from the clutch shoes having developed a glaze. SO I did a powerbrake, and this burned off the glaze, exposing a fresh layer of clutch mat'l. Shudder went away.

At 600 mile mark, the change oil light will come on. So you may want to be ready for that and have a new oil filter on hand if you DIY. Keep receipts of oil and filter in case you have to prove to Suzuki that this 600 mile oil change was done.
 

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Thanks for all the tips, guys! I'm still looking for a 400 myself... might be checking one out on Saturday, in fact. :)
 

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There have also been a number of cases where the 400 tends to use some oil at highway speeds (to the point it should be checked every fillup with that type of riding) that tends to go away at around 10-12k miles. Mine did that and there has been a thread or two where it was discussed.
 

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I just racked up 3600 hwy miles w/in the last 14 days, and my oil level has not moved at all from the upper fill line. So from what I'm seeing, this 2013 400 isn't consuming any oil at all.
 

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I don't believe the later model 400s have the oil consumption problem, do they?
I didn't keep track of the quantities but, until I had over 10K miles on my '09 400, I used enough oil on Interstate runs that I had to keep a close eye on it. Besides adding oil, I also had to suck oil out of the breather box from the blow-by.
 
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