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Discussion Starter #1
I need some tips.........
The Burgman 650 has many great attributes and some short-commings
The one problem I always have is its weight......
Does anybody have TECHNIQUES on how to better handle the weight in solo and two up ..
Please don't respond with buy a smaller bike ..........
THANKS
ahead of time
bernard street........
 

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Experience is all I can recommend. I'd been riding a Honda 250 Elite, which weighed considerably less that either Burgman. When I first started looking for a larger bike, the heavier weight did intimidate me for awhile. The scooters have their weight lower, so that helps MUCH. The first day home with my 650 I had trouble walking it backwards into my garage which I'd always done with my 250. I couldn't get it to roll up the little lip at the doorway. Within a week, though, my mind and body had "adjusted", and wrestled up the extra muscle required to do it. Now that I've had the bike for a few months, it seems no harder to handle than my 250 did. Just don't let it start to fall, or you'll have trouble catching it. Remember that greater mass take more energy to push, and more energy to stop. Be safe.

Dave B.
 

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Put on full safety gear, go find a parking lot, and PRACTICE utilizing the methods taught in the MSF basic riders course. If you haven't taken the course, take it!!!!
 

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The only negative aspect to the weight (and it is a Lardy) is handling when parking or moving in your drive/garage 'engine off' so to speak.

Planning!

By that I mean, never get yourself in the position where you have to haul or 'paddle' this Lardy backwards up a slope - like parking nose in down an incline. ALWAYS park nose uphill by rolling backwards into the slot . Equally if getting over the lip of your Garage is a challenge ride in forwards -under power and reverse out. If the reverse out is too tricky , consider a turnatable or similar for the garage.
 

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Yes, it's heavy...

One of the concerns I have is the weight as well. I will be riding close to home until I get used to it. I learned very quickly (the 1st day!) that I would be riding it into the garage and backing it out. With the grade on my driveway there is NO way I could back it in without getting a hernia.

I do know a bike, even a light one is hard to handle at low speeds. I rode a Kawasaki 125 during my Basic Rider Course and it was great once I got over 10-15 MPH. Under that it was a bear to keep upright. Now my 50CC scooter wasn't too bad either way. Like Paul said, the lower center of gravity helps tremendously.

Dee
 

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bernardavenue wrote (snipped)

I need some tips.........
The Burgman 650 has many great attributes and some short-commings
The one problem I always have is its weight......
Does anybody have TECHNIQUES on how to better handle the weight in solo and two up ..
Besides the good information above, one other thing will help you if you learn to do it right --At very slow and slow speeds, holding the throttle open just enough to move you along, then control your speed with the brake. This does help a lot in slow speed maneuvers, in parking lots or out on the street.
And then of course you could get a lighter bike (sorry, could not resist) :D
 

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dero said:
One other point to keep in mind is that the Burgman is really only heavy when you allow it to lean too far away from the point of balance. So the obvious thing is to try and keep the scooter as upright as possible when you are manhandling or moving slow.
Slight clarification here: Keep it as upright as possible if you are physically pushing the bike. BUT, if you are doing low speed manouvers you must learn to counter balance (bike leans one way, you lean the other). If you do not counter balance and try to keep the bike upright douring those manouvers you're going to run out of road space real quick.

It was mentioned before and I'll mention it again: take a motorcycle skills course and you be way more confident in the things you can make the Burgman do.
 

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bernardavenue said:
Does anybody have TECHNIQUES on how to better handle the weight in solo and two up ..
Low speed manouvers: learn to counter balance--the bike leans one way while you remain sitting upright.

Higher speed: counter steer--push the left handle bar to turn left, push right to turn right (i.e. lean into the turn)

Keep your head up and look where you want to be (i.e. the exit of the turn, not the curb in front of your bike).

Keep the throttle on through a curve. Releasing the throttle will transfer the weight to the front and make it heavier.

Carrying a passenger: tell the passenger to use one hand to grab your jacket at the waist, and use the other hand to hold on to one of the grab bars. Tell them to look ahead over your shoulder on the side that you are turning (try the opposite sometime and you'll feel the bike get heavier). Tell them not to put their feet down when you are stopped (shouldn't be a problem on the Burgman).

Take a motorcycle skills course.
 

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bernardavenue said:
I need some tips.........
The Burgman 650 has many great attributes and some short-commings
The one problem I always have is its weight......
Does anybody have TECHNIQUES on how to better handle the weight in solo and two up ..
Please don't respond with buy a smaller bike ..........
THANKS
ahead of time
bernard street........
Just keep doing what you're doing - the techniques and confidence will come. Time & experience is all. When I first started with the 650 I thought there's no way I'll learn to balance this thing!! Dropped it twice - both times when at walking speed AND having the front brake engaged with the front wheel turned! Most important thing: Never apply front brake a walking speeds unless the front wheel is straight! At this point I can just about stop at a stoplight and remain stopped and perfectly balanced (for about 1/2 a second) - couldn't even feel comfortable driving it at 7 mph 10 months ago.
 

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I'm certainly no Burgman expert. But, since my accident, I've had to have my son move my bike around to access it for repairs. He is 20/140lbs/5'4" and the bike is difficult for him to move around. The one thing I tell him is that when he is going over a bump or on a grade, push the bike with the front wheel as straight as possible.
 

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The trick is that when your daughter has morning band practice, you head to the local mall parking lot which is still deserted and practice your figure 8's, boxes, stop and balance, emergency stops, etc. over and over until band is over. I'm still getting comfortable with the difference in balance and control to handle accident aviodance better.
 

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One addition to all of this good advice. Until you are very comfortable with a heavier bike, stay away from gravel if at all possible. Driving a heavy bike in loose gravel is dicey in most circumstances. Maneuvering it from a parking space, particularly backing it up, can be next to impossible short of having someone else help by pushing while you control the machine. For some reason, my 650 Burgman with the fairing and wide body gives me more problem than my much heavier Kawi Mean Streak.
 

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I found, Heaver bikes are easier to ride 2-up, than lighter ones. The total weight "difference" is less than with a lighter weight bike. Think of having a heavier machine, as pracitce for 2-up. Plus the low C/G, actually made it easier, for me, than riding 2-up on the 400, which I do 95% of the time.

As the others stated, practice and time. Everything is slower, as far as reaction time goes. Ride like its raining and you should be fine.
 

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I can paddle the 650 backwards on level ground, and of course down a slight incline without much problem. Have not had to back up going up a decline yet. When ever possible, I try to park in such a way that I don't have to go backwards to leave.
 
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