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Discussion Starter #1
Hello scooterfans! I'm new here so hope to learn and share!

I'm a Kymco Xciting 500 rider but I'm thinkin of changing to the Burgman 650.

I do most of the maintenance myself on my Kymco Xciting and Honda Shadow: oil, filtres, cooling liquid, etc. etc. Anything that doen't require me to go in the eingine itself.

Can someone tell me if this kind of maintenance is possible for the Burgman 650?

Thanks from the Netherlands.
 

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The Burgman 650 is very diy friendly in the maintenance department. You can get a service manual that shows you how to do everything or check out LeDude's videos.

https://www.youtube.com/user/LeDude00

I watched a lot of his videos to learned how to work on my 650.
 

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The 650 Burgman as has been said is quite user friendly when it comes to diy. However, it does take a longer time to do stuff to it compared to your xciting 500. It's a much more complex bike. But, the 650 is a great bike and just take your time to find your way around it.

Oh...WELCOME TO THE SITE!
 

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Many have had problems with the oil plugs in the swing arm.

They have shallow 8-mm hex holes, and you need a tight-fitting 8-mm hex key to unscrew them.

They need a good whack towards the bottom of the hole to loosen up the thread, before you start to unscrew them.
 

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There's not a whole lot to do. Oil, filter, tranny and gear oil changes is really about it. I did all those in about an hour and I'm not mechanically inclined. Other than a body panel or two, it's all fairly accessible.

Pads maybe every two years (easy and cheap). Air filter change is super simple. Coolant and brake fluid every few years. Maybe a valve check.

Hope it work out for you. Good luck.
 

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Many have had problems with the oil plugs in the swing arm.

They have shallow 8-mm hex holes, and you need a tight-fitting 8-mm hex key to unscrew them.

They need a good whack towards the bottom of the hole to loosen up the thread, before you start to unscrew them.
That's a good idea Erik. I found our two works 650's were both tight in that department. They do come out ok though once you have given them a bit of a shock. And don't over torque them when putting them back.
 

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I find it easier to perform the maintenance on my 650 vs my old 08 400. I also find I spend more time riding my 650 and less time working on it.
 

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No. An obnoxiously loud exhaust and a remap will give you 4 HP at most.

What works best is cutting down the windshield and maybe some lower handlebars, all in order to decrease the large wind drag.

The power button helps in the lower speed range, but 44 rear wheel horsepower and a wet weight of 280 kg just doesn't make a fast bike.
 
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