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Discussion Starter #1
Took mine off the other day to mess with the foam and find that my fairly good quality stapler won't even begin to penetrate the hard plastic pan. The seat was stapled on at the factory, so some sort of stapler was used.

I know several of you have done this. How did you reattach the cover?

Help, I'm losing riding time! :oops: :?
 

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I used a standard Insulation type stapler like "Craftsman or Arrow".
The trick is use 1/4' long, the shortest they have,

Press down hard, before you squeeze the trigger (handle). I also used that pressure to help stretch the covering.

I followed it up by tapping with a hammer.
Let us know if this helps
 

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Yep, use short staples. I re-covered my old Honda elite 250's seat, and had to try three different staplers before finding one that would work. You'll need an electric or air powered stapler. The manual ones basically just cock the head and use a spring to slam it against the staple. If the spring is weak, or you aren't pressing hard against the seat, the staple won't have the oomph it needs to go in.

Good luck.

Dave B.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks guys for suggestions. Will have another go at it tomorrow. Local rental shop has a nice looking electric but no short staples. Lowes doesn't carry any short ones either. Gonna call a couple of car uphostlery places to see what they have.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
took it to the local car uphostlery shop and they stapled it back nicely, made a new cover for my back rest which I had modified and stapled that on for $30. A bit much I thought, but then its the only game in town, and he did do it quickly.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Jim, yes that was the total price.

The main objective of this exercise was to bend the plastic seat pan inward, at the rear most part of the seating area, where it starts to slope up. I'm sure most of you have noticed how hard it is there. I used a mechanics heat gun to heat up a section and with a heavy metal tool I would press on the heated area. After messing with this about an hour I had not accomplished much...only a very slight overall bend. I could heat the plastic till it nearly melted, but one problem was the area being heated was too small to allow widespread bending. So when the cover was reattached I had them put a 1/2 strip of soft foam back there, not that it mattered much. It might help if one wanted to ride without the butt pad.

Also, while the cover was off I shaved down the seating area about where my cheeks fit, maybe a 1/4 inch, and when the cover was put back on I had them put a small thin piece of foam (1/2 in) on the nose part. This is not at all discernable, but what I was trying to achieve was someway to keep from sliding forward and getting wedgies and hopefully a more comfortable seat.
Have only ridden it about 150 miles since, however, I can't really tell much difference in the overall comfort level; just less wedgies. But on an all day ride, to prevent wedgies, it was worth $30.
 

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I tried reforming the seat pan also, but was unsucessfull as well.
Have you tried reshaping the butt stop? That seemed to help me get some additional leg room. The angle is not vertical, adding to the "being pushed foward" feeling. By changing it I had to add close to an inch in the front the, the passinger seat area to fill the void that was created from the butt stop being tilted and relocated higher. Then I added an inch to the driver position in the front, tapering to 0 at the 1/2 way mark, creating a pocket for my butt. Inserting gell pads on both, front and back took care of any long term vibrations.

You can PM me with any additional questions on the butt stop, photos in my gallery. You will need to recover the butt stop for the reshaping, but not the tilting. Tilting creates the void in the rear, but it's not critical you do the passinger area, but does add to passinger comfort as well as looks.
 

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I'm having the same "wedgie-mobile" effect. We settled for adding a custom foam pad (which is a hell of alot easier to mold and shape) and we're sewing a slip-on cover to hold it all in place.
 
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