Suzuki Burgman USA Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
132 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I did own one of these back in day. Just wondering why Suzuki could not make auto like this . And get rid of belt for 650 and 400. It would be the Bomb in my view to have it in a shaft drive too .
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,257 Posts
Main reason not to is that the CVT in the Burgman is much more efficient than the automatic in that 400 could ever be.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
132 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Main reason not to is that the CVT in the Burgman is much more efficient than the automatic in that 400 could ever be.
Oh Ok , just thinking that a type like that would get rid of belt and cvt .
I really cant recall how that 400 did on mileage . I seem to recall about a two and half gal tank and Gas was less than $1.00 a gal :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,863 Posts
and cost. Belt drive is pretty simple overall. The final drive gearbox involves precision machining, however.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,396 Posts
It's due to the cvt that Burgman performs better than many auto and manual tranny vehicles. Besides there's quite interesting project presented on this forum that can potentially increase performance further. the only downside is lower fuel economy, but still quite acceptable me thinks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,142 Posts
Go drive a DCT Honda then come back and kiss your 650 ....Honda don't do automatics.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,204 Posts
There is a reason cars are going from automatic transmissions to CVTs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,810 Posts
My guess is in 5 years there will be a good automatic transmission for bikes , in 10 years they will be common place on many models . Until then enjoy your 650 , and if you find a nice one priced right buy for an extra .

TheReaper!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
The Hondamatics, which were relatively innovative for motorcycles in their day, only had a two speed transmission and relied on a hydraulically driven torque converter to make it go. This is very similar to a old style automatic transmission in your car. The torque converter works well but there is ALWAYS some slipping between the inner and out vanes within the old style torque converter and therefore is it not nearly as efficient as a cvt. With the style of transmission the 650 has in it there is no slippage once the wet clutch is fully engaged (typically in the 1800-2000 rpm range). No slippage equals better mileage ( that last statement though is highly dependent on how much you twist the loud handle! )

Greg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
175 Posts
Moto Guzzi made the same type of bike with an automatic transmission but with a bigger engine.

http://www.motorcycleclassics.com/classic-italian-motorcycles/moto-guzzi-v1000-convert.aspx#axzz3LB39CJRJ

The big problem with such a set up is you only get 2 gears to do what normally 4-5 or 6 gears do and rely on the torque converter to slip enough between the engine and transmission. There is also the problem with the heat generated by the torque converted which needs to be cooled by an oil cooler. With the CVT there are an infinite number of gear ratios with the engine not slipping in relationship to the transmission once the clutch is engaged. In other words the CVT is very efficient compared to the above setup.

On a recent trip to WA state the rental car we had was a Nissan Versa, which happened to have a CVT transmission. This was the first time I've ever driven a car with a CVT. I was very impressed with how the car drove and how the engine speed didn't drop every time the engine changed gears, because there weren't any. It averaged better than 40+ mpg during the 4 days we had it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
115 Posts
The Honda 750 4 also came with the Hondamatic. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hondamatic Many auto designer have tried the CV transmission then when back to a convention hydraulic transmission, including Honda. The Burgman 650 is the best driving automatic I have ever ridden or driven. I just wish it was a little more robust. That could be said about a lot of modern automatics.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
A torque converter can be used with either a geared (e.g. 6 speed) automatic or a continuously variable transmission (CVT.) It is not an alternative to the CVT as implied by greginnm. These scooters use a clutch instead of a torque converter. I assume that size, weight, and cost prohibit using a torque converter.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top