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Discussion Starter #1
All the people I know who ride have straight up motorcycles.
I don't ride with them because they zip around the highways at 100mph.
I don't know if I'll ever really feel comfortable with the 400 on a highway.
How about everyone else. Do you take the highway?
 

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Your kidding right ?
The 400 is used by more then a few members for touring, some even 2up.
Hard to do that without using the highways :lol:
No your not going to get 100 mph but you will go fast enough to get a speeding ticket. :(
My own personal experience... 21,000 miles this year, and it was not stop & go traffic. :)
 

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I don't mind the highway, of course I live in Kansas not the more congested east. I've got a 650 but test drove 400s and 500s on the highways before getting it. I used to have a Honda 250 elite scooter and took it on the two-lane 60mph highways for short trips. Just because your friends ride 100 and zip around doesn't mean you have to. You can probably zip around at 90 on your 400 if you feel the need. I just ride my 650 like I drive my car on the highways. Pass when I need to. Follow if it's fast enough. Slow down in work zones. Etc..

Dave B.
 

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I take to the open road every now and then. I don't like 100 mph. That's just about real-speed max for my 650. However, I'll blow along at an indicated 90 (~81) for long stretches of concrete.

A 400? - I can understand. They will haul butt too, however....

High sustained speeds call for big "cubes" and niether of these scoots are "big cube." Us 650 owners are just fortunate for the extra 250cc.

If you are having to pedal that fast maybe change up groups or tell these friends to slow down. Heck - a ticket costs money in more ways than one.

If I am going with a group (3 or more,) and they start hitting kooky velocities - I let em go. I have my limits. It spooks me enough to have to "do" an indicated 80 to travel at 72.

Pete
 

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In some ways highway riding is safer than riding the secondary streets near where you live. For instance, you won't have folks running stop lights & stop signs or backing out of driveways. The difference is the speed you are moving at if something should go wrong. Overall, I have always felt safer on a divided highway than on secondary streets.

The Burgman 400 has the performance necessary for highway riding. But you need to make sure that your riding skills and comfort level with riding the scooter are up to higher speed riding. Best rule of thumb is always: don't do anything you are not comfortable with doing. Riding beyond your personal skill & comfort level is an invitation for disaster.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I'll slowly hit small stretches here and there to see how I feel, but overall the highway systems here are hilly and congested.
However I'm going to have to get used to it if I plan to make my trip to South Carolina this summer. I'm not taking backroads for 9 hours.
 

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I don't recommend riding/driving 100 mph on any vehicle that does not have wings! Listen, I know that speed turns people on, but to ride a two wheeled vehicle for extended periods at speeds of 100 mph or more (sportbike riders) is just not a good idea. These machines, even the 650, are not built or designed for these speeds to be sustained for a period longer than a few moments. That is why their top speeds are at "around 100 mph", give or take. Anyone looking to go faster than that should get a crotch rocket and hit the track.

Don't mean to sound preachy. Just my two cents. :wink: :wink:
 

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The very reason I stepped up from a Honda Helix to the Burgman 400 was for the ability to run @ Interstate speeds. I don't really enjoy it much, but the 400 will run @ 75-80MPH all day without a problem, but without much reserve. The 650 will do it with power to spare.

It takes me about 10 minutes longer to get to work if I don't take the interstate. There is a day every now and then where I don't have that extra 10 minutes so I take the interstate.

In the safety course, they always teach you about an "excape route' or thinking about avoiding an impending accident. If you are on a 3 lane Interstate and in the middle lane or in the left or right lane and have no shoulder, that's the most dangerous place to be because you simply have no way of escaping a problem. Add one tailgater and you have a recipe for disaster.

So when I take the interstate, I try to stay in the slow lane (which will still have you going 65-70MPH) because they have a very large shoulder to avoid any impending problems up ahead. I always leave plenty enough room to slow down or stop, but invariably the guy behind me never does and he's reading a book or talking on the phone.
 

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To answer your question. I have no problem going 75-80 mph on my 400. The reason being, because my "Silver Queen" actually sings at this speed. My problem is that I want to go faster. The 400 is able to do that, but then I ask myself for what purpose? The answer: it feels great. Not a problem when no one is on the road. The problem occurs when I get use to the speed and have to deal with numnutz on the cell phone, with a cup of coffee reading a book or doing eye make-up in traffic. Then I get ticked off and do things that are absolutely stupid!

So who is the numnutz here? Have no fear, your 400 will give you plenty of speed. Just be prepared to handle it!

Evelyn
 

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For me the 400 is 'primary transportation' that just happens to be fun. When I'm out just riding for enjoyment, I stick to the back roads at 55. When I need to get to a specific location, I hit the highways and Interstates. I regularlly ride at 65 to 80 (indicated) and the 400 handles it very well.
 

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blackskies said:
I'll slowly hit small stretches here and there to see how I feel, but overall the highway systems here are hilly and congested.
However I'm going to have to get used to it if I plan to make my trip to South Carolina this summer. I'm not taking backroads for 9 hours.
When I return to motorcycle after 25-year layoff, I began with a nighthawk 250. I toyed with the street traffic for a few days then moved on to highway-city combination. After about one month and had full-face shield, gloves, and other protective gears, I began to ride mostly freeway, and that nighthawk could get up to 80 mph, albeit whining.

Now I am riding 95% freeway, actually avoiding street because of the number of potholes/rough roads (constant construction) in Houston. I do feel it is safer on freeway than streets because I have no idea when someone is gonna run a red light or stop sign.
 

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I realize going onto congested highways may be more about personal feelings than whether the bike can do it. My first wife grew up in western Kansas and was a fine driver. But when we moved to the St. Loius area for awhile she could not handle the stress driving in the 6 or 8 lane 85mph traffic. Her hands would go white gripping the steering wheel tensed up with fear. My currect wife, however, went to college in big cities and is a big-city driver. We now live in a college town of 40,000, and she drives a bit scary-aggressive for the locals, even though she was born here.

So stay off the highways if you're bothered by the traffic. So long as there are alterative routes, a long ride on a scooter is always more fun than a short but scary one.

Dave B.
 

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highway riding

blackskies,

I feel the 400 performs well on the interstates. I often ride in a group and this sometimes calls for freeway riding at least for part of the trip. I've found I love it! As Pauljo states, no traffic signals, or oncoming vehicles, even semi trucks aren't as intimidating as I thought (actually I find them to be more respectful to riders than other vehicles--sometimes even communicating with us on the CB.)Anyway, I'm sure you'll find your comfort level-- but know that the 400 will take you there.

Burgwoman400 USA
 

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blackskies said:
All the people I know who ride have straight up motorcycles.
I don't ride with them because they zip around the highways at 100mph.
I don't know if I'll ever really feel comfortable with the 400 on a highway.
How about everyone else. Do you take the highway?
Heck yes, I use the 400 on the highway all the time. Sometimes two up.
Now I don't what to go 100mph either but 65 or 70 heck yes. Even 50 to 65 mph is in my opinion is just fine for the highway and the 400 is capable of much more.
 

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Just today my wife and I went 2-up on our 400 on a 120 mile round trip to a neighboring town for coffee, chai, and a little wine tasting. I am a believer in only driving a couple of miles an hour above the cages that are near me, so I'm always edging ahead instead of falling behind. On the freeway, that sometimes means 75-80, and by myself I can do that with more throttle left over than I'm willing to use. Still have power to pass, so I'm good. With my wife on board I'm a bit more conservative and stick religiously to the speed limits because I don't want to risk dumping us both, and the extra weight in the rear makes me want to corner a bit slower. We still have to hold 70-75 for very extended periods, though, and the 400 is admirable at that range. I wouldn't go 100 in a car, and I won't do it on a bike either. The 400 handles well, and manages wind just fine up to 30 mph or so. Anything above that, and I'm gonna get tense. Out here in the open swept plains of Eastern Washington, there are vicious side winds but we did ok. Semi's going in the opposite direction are no problem. the ones going the same direction push enough air in front of them to be really noticable, but not dangerous if I don't tense up over it. I did work up to it, though. Started with the 55mph freeways and gradually added speed with my confidence level.
 

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I don't know exactly _why_ it is that I hate riding on Interstates so much, but I do. Part of it is the excessive windblast, I think. I _hate_ windblast. Part of it is the traffic. And, part of it is that I've driven a cage many, many interstate miles, and have seen lotsa stuff go wrong and people get themselves killed there. But a lot of it, I realize, is just plain stupid irrational fear. I _know_ intellectually that the Interstates are safer, mile for mile. I live in the same area as another Forum member, and he rides these exact same interstates on his identical 400 without either hesitation or difficulty. I can and even do ride them myself, when there's a genuine need.

And yet, I find myself planning each and every trip that I can on slower, more dangerous, 2-lane roads. Like I said, it's an irrational, unreasoned fear.

<sigh>.

Someone above posted that being in the right lane is safest on Interstates due to the availability of the shoulder. While I can follow their reasoning, I'll just note in passing that I've already had several close calls in interstate traffic where people merging try to shove me out of the way, and of course always succeed. For this reason, I've generally moved over into the center lanes except where the entrance ramps are far, far apart. Perhaps I'm wrong in this, but the odds sure look better there to me after what I've been through.
 

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I've been riding with my buddies and seen 100 on the speedometer two, maybe three, times. I back off imediately and let them go on. ( I know that whoever is ahead if me will wait at the next turn to make sure I don't get lost.)

The scooter feels perfecly fine at that speed, and I don't think it's wrong for other people to go that fast.

More to the point, I've ridden my Burgman on the Interstate, and recently ridden with a couple 400s as well. Either model should more than suffice.
 
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