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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know there are some high mileage Burgman 650s. The reason for the bragging rights is not only putting miles on a bike, but having to endure hardships in caring for your Burgman 650s. This would go for any motorcycle/scooter with high mileage. BMWs are not excluded as a 200,000+ BMW R1200 engine can hold out, but other part from the shaft drive to wheel bearing will seize and leave you stranded in the middle of nowhere. Silverwing 600 scooter also did 190,000+ mi before the owner sold it, to avoid more problems.

High mileage Burgman 650s seems to be anywhere from 30,000mi/48280.32 km to 100000+ mi/160934+ km. For someone like myself or anyone else new to the Burgman, what seems to be common to go out are the "stickys" in this section CVT problem, Primary Spline Failures, Wheel bearings and seals. Anything that has to do with the Burgman transmission seems to get complex fast.

Much like changing oil every 3,500mi, adjusting valves every 15,000mi, changing tires when treads get bald. These are preventative measure as we could ride without maintenance; however, this would definitely shorten the life of the Burgman. I know they say that the transmission on the Burgman should last the life of the bike, but this may be much sooner than some of us anticipated :(

When I had the Honda Silverwing 600 Scooter, it was change the belt and roller bearings every 15,000mi for preventative measure.
On the Suzuki Burgman... Are there any preventative measures that can be taken, maybe swap out the CVT problem, Primary Spline, Wheel bearings and seals, before they become a real issue? I know this can get expensive fast if out of warranty; however, part of the cost of bragging rights to a 100,000+mi Burgman 650 still running in good condition :thumbup:
 

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Well Suzuki has solved some of those issues. The primary spline problem was with the early 03 and 04 bikes. Suzuki changed the design in 05 and that appears to have fixed it. Same goes for the wheel bearings and seals. They went to different ones and they seem to hold up better. I'm still running the original bearing in my 07 at 70,000+ miles. Just checked the front bearings monday when I installed a new tire. They were still tight and smooth. The rear bearings were the same the last time I changed a rear tire about 5,000 miles ago.

For the CVT the only maintenance things you can do are to keep the filter cleaned and check the stopper bolt for excessive wear and replace it if needed. You could tear it down and replace the bearings and belt but that is not a trival task and requires some special tools. What I will likely do is just ride mine until the transmission quits them get a replacement transmission and install it myself. You can get a complete new bolt in unit for a little over $2,000 from someplace like Ron Ayers. That includes not only the CVT but the sensors and electric control motor. I've read through the procedures to install it and they look like something a person with average mechanical ability could do. You do need some alignment dowels to aid in installing it but those are really just long bolts with the heads cut off and could be easily fabricated.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Buffalo, at 70,000mi :D - you've earned your "bragging rights".. but more important you and many others on this forum who have high mileage on your Burgmans are a blessing with a wealth of information that you are able to share with those of us new to the Burgman 650s.

I've been riding motorcycles and scooters for over 40+ years and the Burgman 650 is such an unusual motorcycle/scooter. When riding my Silverwing scooter, I never forget that I am riding on a scooter.

When riding the Burgman 650 with the windshield in the highest position on the highway, I forget that I'm riding a scooter. If I don't look at the "step-through" convenience of the Burgman and keep my eyes on the highway, I feel like I'm riding a smooth touring motorcycle. When the windscreen is all the way down, it feels more like a sports tourer. With a low 600mi on the odometer, the manual says it is okay to bring the revs to 6000-rpms. Even at 4000-rpms with the automatic transmission, I could be doing an indicated 70mph depending on the incline.

I understand why some of you put high mileage on your Burgmans. I have owned a few Goldwing 1500, Valkyrie 1500, BMW r1150rs, Harley Davidson Road King Classic, BMW r1200r. At an indicated 100-110+mph, the wind turbulence is restrictive on even large displacement motorcycles. If I can cruise in comfort at highway speeds keeping up with the 'cages' going interstate touring while able to endure the stop-and-go traffic congestions in L.A. I'm happy. At 600mi on my Burgman, I'm confident of the stop-and-go comfort of the Burgman. I have also been pleasantly surprised of the Burgman's ability to cruise at highway speeds. I'm still breaking-in the Burgman due to low mileage, but even after 1000mi, I still plan to ride conservatively. It's good to know that the Burgman has the ability to go the distance.
 

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You probably get that feeling because the 650 really is a wolf in sheep clothing kind of vehicle. Strip off the plastic and look at the layout of the frame, suspension and drive train and you see it is more motorcycle than scooter. It's got a motorcycle style front fork. It's got the engine foward in the frame and the CVT is mounted there too with just a final drive on the swing arm. It's a motorcycle with a step through and an automatic transmission.

When you strip off the plastic of a Silverwing you find it is much more scooter like. The Silverwing does have a solid frame mounted engine but everything else about it resembles a scooter type layout like the 400 has. It's got a scooter style front fork. It has the engine mounted in the back. It has the CVT on the swingarm. Nothing wrong with that, it just creates a bike with a different feel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I had heard and read about these differences that you mentioned between the Silverwing and the Burgman. As I previously owned the Silverwing and only saw a Burgman 650 when they first came out -my basic thought was if it looks like a scooter, it will ride like a scooter.

After riding the Burgman 650, if built like a motorcycle than it has to ride like a motorcycle :D There is nothing wrong with the Silverwing scooter feel as it can cruise all day at 80+mph in comfort. I am impressed with the ride and feel of the Suzuki Burgman 650. Even if I was to trade-in my Burgman tomorrow, I would still be impressed with the ergonomics of this ride. Now understanding why there are so many loyal Burgman owners.
 

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At this point I have around 60,000 miles on mine. I don't really know I leave it on the trip odometer so I can track service. I wound up having to rebuild the CVT with the help MJR and the Reaper also adjust 2 valves around 50,000 miles. Other than that just basic maintenance and replaced the break pads, otherwise fairly smooth sailing.

I returned to riding on a Riva 200 and put 50,000 miles on it. I rebuilt the top end of it around 40,000 miles. It was getting very hard to find parts and I had to fiddle with the carburetor more and more. I still miss riding it I liked the hanging it all out there feel it gave me at around town speeds.
 

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I have a 2005 Burgman 650 with around 38000 miles on the clock. I am hoping for triple that amount before I replace the machine, although that may be a little ambitious. What's the part number for the small 'Stopper Bolt' that needs replacing before catastrophe strikes if/when the bolt has become worn down?
 

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I have a 2005 Burgman 650 with around 38000 miles on the clock. I am hoping for triple that amount before I replace the machine, although that may be a little ambitious. What's the part number for the small 'Stopper Bolt' that needs replacing before catastrophe strikes if/when the bolt has become worn down?
This thread is kind of old, I'm up to almost 139,000 miles now. I mention that because since it was started feelings about the stopper bolt have changed. Many of us think a worn stopper bolt does not cause issues. It tells you that something else is going wrong inside the CVT that is making the bolt wear. Changing out a badly worn one might get you a few more miles. But it is probably just going to quickly become worn.
 
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