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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am looking to buy a heated jacket and gloves hard wired to the battery. Need to know the wattage the bike can handle. Stupid me lost the owners manual
 

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@KellyCarall , I may possibly have a heated gloves and cables and controller for sale... pending the outcome of testing handlebar muffs on my AK. But that may take until after Christmas. My new scooter has heated grips and if the muffs work at the temps I want them to (with the heated grips) then I won't need electric heated gloves. The muffs are on my Christmas list. 馃榿

My heated gloves controller does connect directly to the battery though I usually add an isolated aux fuse block to plug that into, along with any LED light bars and even LED driving lights which each take about the same fuse size. I normally use a 5 amp fuse for each of those items. But I have not installed for a heated jacket.

Anyway, the Burgman 650 will easily handle heated gloves and jacket. I had the heated gloves connected to my first 2005 Burgman 650. Looking on the Gerbing web site it shows the max amps draw on just the gloves is around 2.2-2.4 amps. The heated jacket, if a Gerbing like my gloves are, should be around 6.9-7.6 amps max. So usually a 10 amp fuse should be able to handle both.

Gerbing Battery Harness Installation
 

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I am looking to buy a heated jacket and gloves hard wired to the battery. Need to mow the wattage the bike can handle. Stupid me lost the owners manual
Well, I'm pretty much in agreement with @rjs987, but I'd like to expand on his answer.

Typical Liners:

Most liners seem to require in the neighborhood of 7 amps, when on max heat mode. Add a couple more for gloves, and you're up around 10 amps. (If expressed in watts, divide by c. 12 or 13, to get amps.)

Here are a couple of examples:

Gordon's (the original Gerbing family): "... power for a Gordon's jacket or jacket liner at 90 watts and gloves at 20 watts."


Gerbing liner: "Power consumption: 77 Watts (6.4 Amps)"


FirstGear liner: "Power consumption: 90 Watts (7.5 Amps)"


My experience has been to use a 15-amp circuit, using 14-gauge wire.

Connection:

You might want to check out my write-up from 2007:


This adds a new outlet, dedicated (primarily) for heated gear. Even if an existing outlet is present -- e.g., the cigarette-lighter-style outlet -- in a bike, you want to make sure that it can handle 10 or 15 amps, not only in terms of its fused value but also in terms of its wiring.

It's been my opinion that a lot of such circuits on bikes often use wires that are not really suitable -- too thin -- for the amps they're fused for. Also, if you do happen to blow a fuse, better to blow one that is not involved with any other bike functions, i.e., better to have an isolated circuit.

Also, I went that route in order to add a Powerlet outlet. Powerlet (some DIN standard now) connections are very robust, won't work their way loose, and can handle the current.

Last, I wanted an outlet positioned optimally for heated gear.

I bought a Victory bagger in January 2012, from a dealer in the next state over, and rode it home (CT to NY) in pretty cold weather. Before I could do the relevant farkling (electrical changes), I had to use a cable over the handlebars, connected to cig-style adapter, for my heated liner for that 100+ mile trip home. These are all the sorts of things I wanted to avoid, but put up with for that one trip.

I modified the Victory in a manner very similar to my Burgman (in that earlier post). Here's the gallery -- pics and captions -- for that mod:


Sufficient Juice?

I believe the max wattage of the first-generation Big Burgers is 400-something; I think it's in the shop manual somewhere. That figure is better than some bikes, less than others (and a LOT less than some others).

But that number doesn't really tell you very much, because when you add big-draw accessories it's all about spare juice. That is, we don't really know how much of that capacity the bike requires just to run itself. Well, some good electrician type could attempt to measure that, but it's not as easy as just measuring voltage, for instance. Manuals rarely, if ever, give you this sort of information.

Further, alternator output generally varies with engine RPM, generally increasing with it (at least up to a point). That is, at idle, for instance, the alternator is not putting out whatever that 400-ish-watt-value is.

I experienced this first hand, on my '07 Exec, when, on very rare occasions, I would have heated gloves on, and a heated liner, and the heat was set pretty high, and my route was subject to stop lights (i.e., engine idling). I noticed on an added dash voltmeter that the system voltage was too low. I mentioned this is a couple of posts here, with some electrical observations, watts, etc. You might want to read this one from 2008:


Not that long afterward, I changed out my Motolights bulbs from halogen to LED, saving 60 watts (2 X 35 to 2 X 5). This seemed to do the trick for me.

My point is that heated gear is a big current user, and the Big Burgers don't have much more than what they use to spare. So I'd recommend: a separate circuit, don't crank up everything at once (at least not very often), and try not to stop, if you have everything on max.

That's my position, anyway, although I'm not an engineer, never played one on TV, and haven't stayed in a Holiday Inn Express in a year or so.

Good luck in your quest.

Edit: added "not putting out ..."
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I ordered the heated jacket that comes with everything needed to hard wire it to the battery and instead of heated gloves I got heated liners that I can wear under my regular gloves. I know the heated liners won't be much different than the gloves. They can connect to the wires on the jacket. I just don't want to totally kill my battery using heated gear. I am only going to use it when it's cold obviously, and I plan on getting a new battery in the spring. The battery voltage is still good but the battery is five years old already. I don't want to use a separate plug in for the heated gear. I would rather wire it to the battery.
 

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I ordered the heated jacket that comes with everything needed to hard wire it to the battery and instead of heated gloves I got heated liners that I can wear under my regular gloves. I know the heated liners won't be much different than the gloves. They can connect to the wires on the jacket. I just don't want to totally kill my battery using heated gear. I am only going to use it when it's cold obviously, and I plan on getting a new battery in the spring. The battery voltage is still good but the battery is five years old already. I don't want to use a separate plug in for the heated gear. I would rather wire it to the battery.
1) Okay, moderate use, especially when everything is on max heat, you'll be fine.

2) I'd like to clarify this: in my setup, it IS directly connected to the battery. So we're on the same page here.

That is, the female part of the Powerlet -- the socket -- is directly connected to the battery (with the hot wire, the positive side, the red side, fused, close to the battery -- you always want to do that). The male part of the Powerlet -- the plug -- is just a connector.

So whatever mechanism you use to connect your gear directly to the battery, you will have some sort of connector. Heated gear usually terminates in what's called a "coax" connector (a round gizmo), and you will need to have the mating coax connector coming from the battery, often with a coax extension in between.

Alternatively, some systems could employ a wire with an "SAE" plug; those are the different height plugs, a short recessed pin, and a taller bare pin. In such a setup, the coax from the heated liner will mate with a wire-pair that has a coax on one end and an SAE on the other.

But in any case, you will have some sort of connector, um, connecting the wire that attaches to the battery terminal and the wire that comes out of the gear.

In my Powerlet setup, I just substituted a male-to-female Powerlet connection for, say, a male-to-female coax connection, or an SAE-to-SAE connection. I did that because I find popping in and pulling out a Powerlet plug easier to grasp, easier to manipulate, is all. If you don't have SOME sort of connector, your liner will be permanently attached to the bike, and you will have to be some kind of contortionist to get it on and off.

Follow me?

In any event, good luck with your project.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited by Moderator)
1) Okay, moderate use, especially when everything is on max heat, you'll be fine.

I have heard that they do generate a lot of heat so I probably won't have it on max heat all the time. Even if I did to start they tend to keep the heat in pretty well from what I've heard.

2) I'd like to clarify this: in my setup, it IS directly connected to the battery. So we're on the same page here.
Ok, I misunderstood what you had said a little bit. Sorry about that.
 

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your battery is 5 years old, expect it to die soon and possibly suddenly. as to your original question, if you wire directly to the battery, the battery is determinate , not the bike, but your further post says you don't want to kill tha battery by exceeding the charge capability of the bike, good call, do you have any other electric farkles installed? the rectifier and alternator have limit.
a trickle charger/battey maintainer plugged in at night is your best friend in cold weather.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
your battery is 5 years old, expect it to die soon and possibly suddenly. as to your original question, if you wire directly to the battery, the battery is determinate , not the bike, but your further post says you don't want to kill tha battery by exceeding the charge capability of the bike, good call, do you have any other electric farkles installed? the rectifier and alternator have limit.
a trickle charger/battey maintainer plugged in at night is your best friend in cold weather.
I do plan on replacing the battery in the spring. The only other electrical "farkles" I have is the blue tooth stereo that was put on about 2 years ago. But that isn't connected directly to the battery. That is connected to the back of the cigarette lighter in the glove compartment.
 

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And that cigarette lighter (12 vdc socket, or power source as Suzuki calls it) is wired directly through the ignition switch, a fuse, the bike computer and then on to the battery. There are also a few other things one of those wires is connected to as well.

But Mikey is right. If wired directly to the battery then the battery determines how much drain it can handle. Yet the charge circuit determines how much of that drain can be replaced while you ride.
Another reason I put mine on a isolated aux fuse block is that I also set that fuse block to shut off when the bike is shut off. Just a safety measure in case I forget.
 

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The charging circuit, and the battery are in parallel, so whether you go direct to the battery, or you go through an existing wiring circuit, the charging circuit voltage will be loaded down the same as the battery.
 

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The charging circuit, and the battery are in parallel, so whether you go direct to the battery, or you go through an existing wiring circuit, the charging circuit voltage will be loaded down the same as the battery.
This is 100% truth.

But....

Where you draw power off of does matter a lot. We do not need to add any more amperage draw through the ignition switch. As a matter of fact, we should move some high current draw OFF the factory wiring and put them on a switched power relay system like RJS said above.

The 2013 and newer Burgman 650's they added relays to the headlights to remove that current off the ignition switch. Suzuki most likely listened to this forum about so many ignition switch failures back in the 1st gen days....
 

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This is 100% truth.

But....
I agree- Adding a relay to not add load through a failure prone ignition switch makes sense, but I didn鈥檛 see that conversation, (maybe I missed it? ) When I commented, my response was only to the conversation regarding increased load on the charging circuit ex: 鈥渢he rectifier and alternator have limit.鈥
 

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persnlly I find a few tablespoons of tabasco taken jus before a ride warms the core quite well an wipin the sweat from yer face keeps the hands warm. "exhaust smoke" may be a side effect.
 

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I agree- Adding a relay to not add load through a failure prone ignition switch makes sense, but I didn鈥檛 see that conversation, (maybe I missed it? ) When I commented, my response was only to the conversation regarding increased load on the charging circuit ex: 鈥渢he rectifier and alternator have limit.鈥
An isolated aux fuse block IS a relay triggered isolated power supply system that can be home made, like I sometimes make myself, or prepackaged as many are that are available. Power is taken directly from the battery to a relay that, when turned on, sends that power to the isolated fuse block to provide power to anything you plug into it. It's called isolated because it is not connected to any bike electrical system other than getting power directly from the battery and also one trigger tap on a wire that only has power when the bike is turned on... such as the hot wire of the 12 volt socket. The trigger is such a small load that it can be considered insignificant. (explanation for the benefit of those unfamiliar).
 
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