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Discussion Starter · #21 · (Edited)
prossett , pics of your assembled First-Aid Kit will be nice….

I followed Dave_J ‘s advice and got a used like new Mercedes Benz First Aid Kit for less than $10 … and it still has room for more stuff.
Yes, you're right - that would have served as a good starting point...

Here is my current pack, previously for kayaking, now thrown into the front right shelf of the Burgman - for "later" development.

Well, now is later :)
Plant Flower Fluid Flower Arranging Gas


Inside... sugary oaty snack, foil survival blanket, and Opinel 5 pocket knife, and "kayaking" first aid kit.
Luggage and bags Bag Material property Font Houseplant

Inside the kit: tweezers, small scissors, anti-hystemines, muscle fatigue pain killers, a spray-on disinfectant, a spray-on bandage, some gauze tape, 4mm/2.4" gauze roll length 6m/157" , 4x gauze swabs, and assorted plasters (mostly for hands, fingers from paddling).
Table White Plant Flowerpot Eyewear


Needs some development... plenty of room in the pouch.
 

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Here is my current pack, previously for kayaking, now thrown into the front right shelf of the Burgman - for "later" development.
Great start, it’s nice it’s packed in a dry bag.
I think you’re more likely to render aid to another
than using the kit for yourself … so pack accordingly.
 

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Any trained / experienced emergency responders or hardened men in the tavern? :devilish:

In preparation for a month-long ride from Arabia to EU, I'm assembling a first aid kit / plan and could use some advice.

Actually, I already have a kit, and I've trained St John's Ambulance first aid course, and seen some use; so we're not starting from scratch - but over-confidence can be just as bad as under-preparedness, and so I'd appreciate someone to talk things over.

The situation is mainly motorcycle accident, but we could add in camping as well as more generic survival, too.

Basically, I'll be on the open road for 30-ish days, on my Burgman, and would like to be as self-sufficient as possible.

I'm not thinking of discussing setting broken bones, or anything like that - I'll be solo, but on well-traveled roads; so I reckon someone will throw me into the back of a pick-up truck and drive me to the nearest doctor for serious stuff.

Instead I'm interested in self-care as much as possible, prevention preferably, or patch up and keep going, if possible.

I've read First Aid Kit what are you carrying and where ? and looked over the usual youtube videos, such as:

From preventing sunburn, dehydration, diarrhea, constipation, I dunno... gonorrhea LOL, to how to deal with minor scooter spills and wild camping issues, such as wild dog bites, to the more serious possibilites of hard crashes, what would you be thinking of if you were planning a 10,000km / 6,000 mile ride across Arabia?

I might be missing something obvious, and your comment could be a great help.
You may not agree with an assessment I made in 2001 or 2002. I went from Michigan to Redmond OR. For BMW Intl Rally. My whole 2 weeks on roadway done with leather and or nylon coat on 95% of the time. Keeps you hydrated, with no sunburn, or I'll effects of the sun. Your hands, you decide.
Decidedly, dark sunburn/TAN. OR GLOVED. Mine were decidedly dark, with lotion 2X daily. No troubles done in this fashion. On the road for my 1st long trip. My 1981 BMW R100RT was my chose steed of the moment. A trouble free trip to be sure, but we'll prepped.
 

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German road law is that you have a 'DIN' standard first aid kit to use for others at an accident. You are kind of compelled to render aid to all victims and you may be sued if you do not. So every car must has a DIN standard first aid kit to pass TUV. The higher end cars always had a better kit.

If you come upon a crash, if you can get their first aid kit out of their trunk, you use theirs. But if you can not get theirs, you must use yours and file a claim to get it replaced.

When I was there bikes did not have to have one.
 

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One thing that I carry rolled up on my long trips is a padded blanket that has heat barrier on one side. If a motorcyclist is laying on HOT pavement you will need to slide this padded blanket under them to keep from getting burns from hot pavement.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Thanks all - very useful discussion.

A quick re-cap so far. Considering adding:

- petroleum jelly (vaseline) and cling film - for covering skin scrape wounds, aka road rash

- trauma bandage, aka Israeli bandage - for managing heavy bleeding

- ACE bandage wrap - for immobilizing joint sprains, and general movement

- immodium tablets - for if I gets the runs...

In a separate bag, the day-camp bag, there are hygiene/convenience items, such as sunscreen, insect repellent, large bio-degradable wet wipes, etc. And with the riding gear I'll have a bandana and gloves, as well as riding boots, jacket, pants, and helmet. On my wrist will be an ID bracelet with contacts.

Also had another conclusion, which connects from an earlier discussion about communications: having the one cell phone with 2 SIM cards (one local for data, the other international for emergency calls) is not sufficient as it would be mounted to the handlbars, serving in daily use as navigator. In the event of a crash, it might be shattered or far away or easily pinched by curious bystanders who could quickly gather. That would leave me without comms (embassy, ambulance, activate family, etc.)

So, better have a secondary phone with the international SIM, on my person, in a shatterproof case - that way whatever happens to the main phone/navigator on the handlebars, there will always be this back-up phone for emergency calls.

Any other tips or pointers?
 

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Adding to the suggestion by Hugo2006 of purifier water bottles you could get yourself a Lifestraw which would easily pack into your first aid kit. Lifestraw also do the bottles and even a hanging bag but the little straw would be idea. I saw a demonstration once ( on YT I think ? )where the guy sucked up water from a duck pond and was 100% ok.
Lifestraw
 

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If he was suckin water up from a dick pond sumpthin was wrong with him fore he got to the pond!:sick:🤮
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Quack! :D

The lifestraw is a good suggestion, and worth adding to anyone's kit.

The reason I didn't jump on it is the environment I'll be riding through. Very arid, with no surface water, not even duck ponds. Dick ponds may be available, or so I've heard...

In most of the Middle East, to find water you need to dig down deep - and know where to dig. And have children you can tie a rope around their feet to lower them down to do the digging... So instead I'll be carrying 5L of water, on the scooter, in addition to my regular drinking bottles.

Actually, in a survival situation, you'd be best off trying to collect morning dew off shrubbery, so a large plastic sheet would be the way to go. Still, we're talking harvesting a few sips, not enough to live on.

However, given the real scarcity, shops and houses are always ready to offer drinking water to anyone. Some even set up chilled water dispensers outside their houses, so people can have a sip as they walk past. Every public building or mosque has water, too. And you can almost bet every car on a long trip will be carrying a few bottles, if not a spare gallon in the trunk. Truck drivers, certainly.

As long as the desalination plants keep working, all is good.
 

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@prossett :

Satellite Communication:

Someone mentioned (in this or one of your other threads) a satellite phone, in case you need assistance -- injury, breakdown, etc. -- when you're not in range of a cell tower. I think that's a good idea.

Three or four years ago (at Americade, a big annual motorcycle rally about an hour from my house), I bought a Spot Gen 3 (now superseded) for just such purposes, i.e., for solo rides, in some really rural area. For their products, see:


Garmin makes a couple of devices with similar functionality. See:


I was reading a review a few months ago (in motorcycle.com, I think it was) that had a comparison of two specific Spot and Garmin devices. There was -- big surprise! -- pros and cons to each device and each vendor.

I'm not exactly sure of the coverage areas for either company, in terms of assorted continents. I leave that as an exercise for the reader.

In my case, I didn't find myself off the grid, broken down or injured notwithstanding, enough, or maybe at all, and eventually let my subscription to Spot lapse. (All of these require subscriptions, and after I let the Spot lapse I've noticed that they now offer partial-year subscriptions, which they didn't do a few years ago.) I think a device like this would be worthwhile for you ... at least, more so than for me.

Sat Nav:

On a somewhat related note, my other suggestion to you is to buy a Garmin or TomTom or something like that for navigation. That is, given the potential problems vis-a-vis vibration with phones (which, for example, may have video stabilizers and other delicate internals, that have nothing to do with navigation), the cost of phones, the off-bike usefulness of phones, and, as you note, the possibility of theft, I'd just buy a dedicated navigation device.

These things are cheap enough, especially compared to what you'll be spending on your trip, and should eliminate the need for a second phone. I'm not talking about an Itchy Boots type of top-tier sat nav, but rather a cheap one that will get the job done for $ hundreds less.

Another alternative, I suppose, combining these two thoughts, is to spend a fair chunk of change and get a Garmin that combines sat nav with communication. I think they have such devices. The problem I have with this solution, though, is that I'd want any emergency SOS device -- the kind I talked about in my first paragraphs -- to be on my person, e.g., in a zipped jacket pocket, rather than mounted on a bike. This is something I could do with the Spot. The problem with bike-mounted emergency devices is that you may not be able to get to them, if you and your bike are separated as part of a crash.
 

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Great start, it’s nice it’s packed in a dry bag.
I think you’re more likely to render aid to another
than using the kit for yourself … so pack accordingly.
That's an important point.

Also, anti-emetics/anti-diarrheal meds in case of foodborne illness.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
Thank you - all are good points of advice and of great support as I consider the best way forward.

I think the best way in which I can express my gratitude is to make sure I post daily or as often as possible during the trip itself; so that, in a sense, just as you all have helped with the preparations, also you will join in the trip :cool: even if vicariously.

Much appreciation.
 
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