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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Any trained / experienced emergency responders or hardened men in the tavern? :devilish:

In preparation for a month-long ride from Arabia to EU, I'm assembling a first aid kit / plan and could use some advice.

Actually, I already have a kit, and I've trained St John's Ambulance first aid course, and seen some use; so we're not starting from scratch - but over-confidence can be just as bad as under-preparedness, and so I'd appreciate someone to talk things over.

The situation is mainly motorcycle accident, but we could add in camping as well as more generic survival, too.

Basically, I'll be on the open road for 30-ish days, on my Burgman, and would like to be as self-sufficient as possible.

I'm not thinking of discussing setting broken bones, or anything like that - I'll be solo, but on well-traveled roads; so I reckon someone will throw me into the back of a pick-up truck and drive me to the nearest doctor for serious stuff.

Instead I'm interested in self-care as much as possible, prevention preferably, or patch up and keep going, if possible.

I've read First Aid Kit what are you carrying and where ? and looked over the usual youtube videos, such as:

From preventing sunburn, dehydration, diarrhea, constipation, I dunno... gonorrhea LOL, to how to deal with minor scooter spills and wild camping issues, such as wild dog bites, to the more serious possibilites of hard crashes, what would you be thinking of if you were planning a 10,000km / 6,000 mile ride across Arabia?

I might be missing something obvious, and your comment could be a great help.
 

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Preparation H ! (bleve it or don't it can help with sunburn pain/ skin discomfort) but not as chapstick 馃槚
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
All I would say is ride as safe as possible and within your limits and avoid riding when seriously tired.
Take a very good first aid pack and most of all make sure you have the very best in travel insurance.
Looking forward to reading about your adventure.
Thanks, good point on the medical coverage - I have a top plan, courtesy of employer, so once in hospital all is good from that side of things. My focus is the prevention and the on-the-spot self-care.

Absolutely right on the riding when tired... that's the number one issue to avoid. Glad you raised it. I'm thinking 3-4 hours a day, and that's it. Morning rise, pack camp, and ride till lunch. Then tourist stuff and nap, scout out camping site.

Also a good reminder on defensive riding... I try practice that anyways, but let me add a few more extra shiny stickers to help be noticed, thannks for prompting the idea (distracted drivers from behind are my worst fear... ahead of me, I trust myself to see them and take appropriate action - but from behind, they really scare me. Some dude speeding, with his left foot up on the dash and his right finger up his nose...that's bad news for a scooter! And don't even get me started on how many I see on their cell phone!!!)

All kidding aside, I've lost several friends and attended to families who have lost people to road crashes here :(

Preparation H added to list!! helps with motorcycle monkey butt, too!

EDIT: actually, if I may expand on the defensive riding, because it's important. I'm an older guy, with a lifetime of riding experience in all sorts of weird countries - you know my best defensive riding strategy? You'll like this... it is to appear and be seen to be 'the crazy one' on the road LOOOL seriously. Most drivers are wary of motorcycle riders, who over here have the reputation of racing and riding erratically - and so I take my full lane, confidently, and swerve a little here and there every so often (on purpose), and look like I might do something stupid at any moment... and the cars give me a wide berth :cool: I'm 100% serious.

Of course this doesn't help against the distracted drivers, as mentioned above...
 

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I don鈥檛 know about overseas or your nationality but here in the UK when we travel we take out travel insurance which covers you for any medical eventuality ie sickness, injury, dental, doctors or hospitalisation etc etc even repatriation and getting your scooter home ( although recovery insurance would be good to have ) Is that something you could possibly get or look into? Perhaps one dedicated to motorcycling? At least you know you would be looked after if heavens forbid anything did happen. Just a thought.
 

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Preparation H ! (bleve it or don't it can help with sunburn pain/ skin discomfort) but not as chapstick or Toothpaste 馃槚
Fixed that for ya MikeyM. In the dark, use caution reaching for the toothpaste.
 

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One thing to have on hand is a small roll of white cotton muslim about 4 to 6 inches wide. Keep in a zip-lock bag. You can use it as padding or fill. But it comes handy as a gauge bandaid backing, splint or bandoleer sling. You can even use it as a flag to get noticed.
 
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Not all first aid related: Is your tetanus shot up-to-date? It never hurts to have a roll of toilet paper on you. Always keep spare water with you. If you do consider going rural, consider a sat phone. Don't forget tools/parts for your ride. I always have wet wipes available. Compact portable jump starter unit. Do you have anything with your blood type and any other pertinent health information...... in cased you end up unconscious, including emergency contact(s).
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
Thanks all - great discussion and useful tips, all duly noted.

In terms of self-care at the scene of the mishap, what might you predict?

I'm not thinking of plunging straws into my trachea to keep breathing, or anything Hollywoodian - just straight up you're on your bike whistling along one minute, and the next some car has side-swiped you, or cut across, or braked suddenly, whatever... and you swerve off at speed, or maybe brake but whack into the car, or lose balance and scrape along tarmac for a bit - what can be done during the time you wait for care to arrive, or if care is not quite required and you figure you can patch yourself up and keep going?

What would you need, what would you do?

Assuming ATGATT, of course.
 

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Cling film and petroleum jelly - and not just for party night.

petroleum jelly is good for sealing cuts, grazes and abrasions. Keeps germs/dirt out until it can be washed and carries the dirt away when washed.
Not sure if clingfilm is recommended but I was grateful of it to keep clothing and muck off gravel rash until it could be dealt with properly
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Cling film and petroleum jelly - and not just for party night.

petroleum jelly is good for sealing cuts, grazes and abrasions. Keeps germs/dirt out until it can be washed and carries the dirt away when washed.
Not sure if clingfilm is recommended but I was grateful of it to keep clothing and muck off gravel rash until it could be dealt with properly
Didn't know this - thanks.
 

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If you鈥檒l excuse the diversion:
That is reputedly how petroleum jelly was discovered.

Oil workers were seen to rub a whipped up oil that formed on the drill rods. They called the the useless by-product gloop 鈥渞od wax鈥 and rubbed it on skin and into wounds. It prevented infections getting a hold.
A smart cookie saw them, took samples and refined the idea to pretty much what we have today.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Nothing I love more than diversions! ;)

I can see how petroleum jelly / vaseline seals a scrape perfectly, but how do you wash it out afterwards? It's waterproof, or close to it - doesn't it just stick onto the wound?

I never would have thought of smearing it on just because I can imagine the pain of trying to remove it afterwards...

Does it dissolve in soapy water?
 

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Common injuries that I would consider are burns, lacerations, sprains, and foreign objects. Stuff I think that is worth carrying: Small quality scissors and tweezers, metal nail file, a couple of non-stick 4x4s (cutting to size can multiply use), a couple of packs of topical ATB ung (not just for infection but to help make non-stick drsg), old fashioned white cloth dressing tape (don't need a great big roll and 1" is easily dbled in length for most uses and is tough stuff), an ACE wrap (multiple uses, can be washed, great to protect a wound drsg. Bulky but I store mine unrolled. I have cut them shorter and just taped cut end), a qt. size quality zip lock can be used for warm/cold packs.
 

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prossett , pics of your assembled First-Aid Kit will be nice鈥.

I followed Dave_J 鈥榮 advice and got a used like new Mercedes Benz First Aid Kit for less than $10 鈥 and it still has room for more stuff.
 
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