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an there's the rub, hard, not flexible, the flexy stuff i've used ashes on let go of the hard stuff,
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Does the group have a better, more cost effective solution? I have a tab up front and low, beside the radiator that needs repaired. Whenever I need to remove that piece down the road, I would like to do a more permanent fix than what is in place now.
 

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Does the group have a better, more cost effective solution? I have a tab up front and low, beside the radiator that needs repaired. Whenever I need to remove that piece down the road, I would like to do a more permanent fix than what is in place now.
You can try baking soda an CA glue, iv repaired my ex xmax400 plastics with this, i even managed to close hole on plastic fuel tank with it. Best way would be to weld plastic ( i dont know exact english word, in Croatia we call it plastic welding although is more melting), with abs plastic stick.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
You can try baking soda an CA glue, iv repaired my ex xmax400 plastics with this, i even managed to close hole on plastic fuel tank with it. Best way would be to weld plastic ( i dont know exact english word, in Croatia we call it plastic welding although is more melting), with abs plastic stick.
I've also seen sawdust and cotton balls used with Super Glue. If it has worked for you, I will try it. Is CA glue the same as Super Glue?
 

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Just a quick info,

Welding metal is casting two pieces together by melting the steel and adding a melting filler that mixes all three together in the melt puddle. It is not forging the metals.

So melting two pieces of plastic together with a melting filler is still welding.

Bonding is using a filler that does not melt the pieces but enters the small pores and when set up bonds the two.

Brazing is kind of like bonding. You heat iron till near cherry red. This causes the iron to expand and pores to open. Then add brass brazing rod, the brass flows into those open pores and when cooled the pores close up and traps the brass and bonds the iron.

Forging is where you heat the two pieces of metal cherry red and then hammer it together, usually folding the edges while cherry red and then hammering those flat.
 
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West Systems G/Flex 650 epoxy with thin fiberglass fibers. I fixed a couple dozen broken tabs and cracks on Honda Pacific Coast tupperware using this method. Follow the directions and it will be stronger than the plastic it is bonded to.
 

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When I bought my one-owner, dealer maintained 650 it only had one problem. The older than me guy dropped it in the garage (on his leg) and broke a piece of plastic. He was fine but his wife made him park it and put it up for sell!!

I fixed a three-inch crack by welding it (carefully on the inside) and it’s still together and practically invisible after 10,000 miles.

The tabs I was missing were along the bottom and it’s a piece that occasionally needs to be removed for maintenance so I did something different… a couple of small pieces of two-inch wide industrial Velcro!!

It’s had lots of highway wind and back road bumps, rain puddles and washings and it’s never turned loose.
 

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I have used 3M industrial Velcro on other applications similar to this.
It might work great on the tupperware. It's much stronger than regular Velcro. It may even be too strong in this application. The adhesive holding the two parts of the Velcro to the tupperware
may fail before the Velcro separates unless special attention is paid to surface preparation when installing on the ABS.
 
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