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Please, I need a clue about dealing with dealers.
How can I get them to see reason? What do I say to get them to consider something lower than the MSRP? I want to haggle for a fair deal, and they just stone wall. Do you have any experience with breaking these guys down to a more human level?

I just realized I posted this under the wrong subject, feel free to move it up to 'General Discussion' if you prefer.
 

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Being willing to walk away and wait a few days will make a big difference with some dealers. They'll call you with a lower price offer. Call around and find prices with other dealers in you area. Find some online pricing (plus shipping costs) and carry it with you as ammo to haggle. If the dealer is not willing to come off the MSRP, find another dealer that will.
 

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I hate haggling. No one that I know goes into a grocery store or a gas station and haggles over the prices; what you see is what you pay.

But for some reason buying vehicles is like going into a middle Eastern bazaar. It becomes a game to get to a meeting point between asking and offerring prices. Ridiculous!

From now on I'm just going to send a letter to several dealers saying, I will be buying such-and-such a vehicle on such-and-such a date and want such-and-such options: what's your price? And let them know that I'm sending the same letter to other dealers. It's a variation on the "Request for Quotation" that's used in business for buying goods and services.

Of course I live in an area with over 3 million people and lots of dealerships. That may not work everywhere.
 

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Start out by being as informed as possible. Research what others have paid in forums like this. Look at the manufactured date on the bike to see when it was produced. If it was produced several months ago you can offer less. If it was produced last week you won't get much of a bargain.

Ask them for their best price out of the door tax and all. If it's list or higher (with dealer fees) say the best you can afford is $500 or even $1000 less. Offer them that. If they come back with something in between, say you weren't kidding and if that's the best they can do you'll have to pass. Be prepared to walk out, and do so if they don't offer something less. If the new quote is still higher than your $500 less offer but getting close tell them you might be able to afford that next month. Mention that in the mean time you'll be looking at other dealers and other bikes. Start putting on your coat and walk toward the door. If they don't try one more time to quote something lower then leave.

If they quote you a price you like, make sure it is all-inclusive. I've heard a price only to find out when sitting down to sign the deal they want $200 to $300 more in dealer setup/shipping/whatever fees. Remind them you asked for an all-inclusive price and hold them too it. If they refuse then walk out.

Don't be afraid to leave if you feel uncomfortable or being swindled or not given any respect. Leave if you don't get the price you want. You can always come back. The longer they have a bike in stock the more it costs them. If they've still got the bike you want a month later, they will be more likely to sell it for the price you want. If they've just uncrated a 2005 bike, then don't expect much discount.

Do NOT negotiate for monthly payments. They will easily agree, then find an interest rate and number of years for the loan that will result in them making much more in interest off you than in profit-at-time-of-sale.

Hope that helps. It has helped me save thousands as I've gotten new vehicles the past few years.
 

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The whole key is being willing to make them bid against each other, though they'll kick and scream the whole way. An Internet price can make a nice starting point. Take it in, and see if a dealer will match it. Get a firm out-the-door number. Then toss the internet price in the trash-- it was just a starting point to get things moving-- and take the first dealer's numbers to a second and see if they will beat it, again out-the-door. If so, go to a third, then back to the first, and so on.

The dealers will resist this _strongly_ once they figure out what is going on, but there is only so much they can do so long as _you_ are in control of the transaction. (And never forget that you are; if you do not sign the contract, they get nothing.) Plus, at a certain point the amounts that the prices drop will no longer be worth your time and effort. Only you can judge when it's time to stop the bidding and make the actual purchase.

I'll also note in passing that I would _never_ take my machine back to be worked on by a dealer who would not make me an offer below MSRP until compelled to do so. If he wants to rip you off at sale time, he'll do so again and again at service-time.
 

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For some years now, I have been buying my cars by asking dealers to submit bids to me by mail. I give them the exact specifications and, if they choose, they can return a bid by the requested date. I usually do at least five that are in the my area. I then go with the best bid for exactly what I want. I actually visit the lowest two or three and negotiate trade-in, when I have one, and write a check. Sometimes I have no trade and can complete the transaction by phone or, more recently, email.
You can do much the same thing with Suzuki dealers and minimize the time you are actually dealing with sales people. Simply write down exactly what you want and mail/email several dealers and ask for a written response by a reasonable date. It works. Extreme Suzuki in Bellaire, Ohio has a history of meeting or beating any legitimate written price quote from any other bona fide dealer and there are several others who purport to do the same thing. Just be sure that all quotes are "apples-to-apples" comparisons and fully inclusive of all costs.
I also do this with every other major purchase. Good luck!
 

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The biggest thing here I believe that hasn't been mentioned is going in with a poker face. If you approach them so hyped and enthusiastic about getting this particular machine they will feed off that. I always tell them after my first offer that my heart is not really into this machine and its not exactly what I want and I get up and start to walk out when they return a higher quote. The salesman asks if I'm going to make another offer and I tell him the same, No it's not exactly what I want anyways. They ask me to wait a minute as they disappear. They return with a lower price not suitable to me and we go through the whole process again. Finally I give in and add $100 to my original offer. They return this time with the manager and I go through the whole process again. When all is said and done I get the machine for the $100 over my first quote.

Now here is the price I got for my scoot. I bought mine in the late fall when sales of bikes is slow. I also bought a demo bike with 110 kms on it.
The MSRP on this machine was $10,999. I got it for $8,400. The only reason I own the Burgman is the screaming deal I figured I got on it. I couldnt afford the MSRP. I didn't let them know that I had been drooling all summer over this machine. Oppurtunity knocked and I answered the call and I'm loving it.
 

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Here is my motto for dealing on vehicles - "NEVER desire/want a car/motorcycle so much that you are unwilling to walk away from a dealer" There will always be another deal out there you can live with.

I failed to follow my own advice one time and got stuck with such a bad deal I unloaded the car 6 months later cause I still felt so bad about it.
 

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Take your time

Lots of good advice already posted about being informed, checking other dealers, being willing to walk out, and such. Along with those, one tactic I have used that was successful in getting "my" price on a vehicle was to be willing to tie up a salesperson for a length of time. Obviously this only works at dealers that give commission on sales, forunately most do.

Best deal I ever got was from an Oldsmobile dealership. I tied up one salesman for five hours of discussion and negotiation. At the end of the five hours, which was an hour after they closed on a Saturday night, we were still $500 a part on price. I thanked the salesman for his time and started walking out. Before the door closed behind me he was there with his sales manager meeting my price. After that much time, they wanted some money instead of none.

In scooterdom I hadn't had to go to that extreme, though I did tie up the salesman for nearly an hour when I bought my Burgman. Got a price I felt was fair based on sales in the area.

Of course, supply and demand plays a factor too. Paid MSRP when I bought my Reflex in 2001. It was the last one in the state and two other people were in the dealership talking to other salespeople about buying it.

Good luck in your negotiations.
 

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dealers thing

Dealers can be very anoying. I found a burg, 2003, with 3000 miles on it, in great shape, saw it. sat on it, got a price, $5800. (MA, usa). Went, got an e-loan, rock bottom intrest rate, with a full price of $5500, but no price on the check, it was blank. Went to the dealer, they told me the price, I had looked around first also. Told them, to throw in the full suzuki warrenty for 3 yrs, go over it, and send it to my house, whipped out the blank check, and said, I will wright 5000 in here, give you a cashiers check, right here right now, for the 5 grand including delivery, setup, and warrenty. they himmed and hawed over it, so I walked out, said cya, the dealer cut me off at the door, and agreed to it. I also told them for making me wait, toss in a cover, they did. I am happily riding the bike, I have spoken to the original owner, in my town, he went to a sports bike vrs the burger 650, something about an insane 1100cc crotch-rocket lol lol Bottom line, if you have a cashiers check in hand, and willing to give them a price (be fair about it also though) and are willing to walk, you will get what you want most of the time.
 

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I have been working this for the last two weeks. Have talked to all 6 local dealers. Asked the same questions to all and told all I was going to talk to the rest. I was surprised that some dealers didn't seem to want to sell me a bike. I ask for the OTD price got answer like "between 8500-9000" What finally happen, I talked with everyone I knew who owned a Suzuki. One of thes people had very high mark for one of the local dealers I had not yet spoke with. I called that dealer, told him I was sent by Steve and that Steve had stated what a fair price he paid and that your dealership had a great service department. I then asked for a OTD price for a Blue 2005 650. All this was done from out of state. I fly home Thursday night and have a meeting to do the paperwork for my new 650. I don't know if its the best price anyone has received, but it is the best price in this area 8100.00 OTD . Hope you succeed in you quest. I know I can not stop smiling. I order my new scoot Friday.
 
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