Suzuki Burgman USA Forum banner

1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,060 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Chilean newspaper talks about a off duty policeman who was riding his bike and all of the sudden the car in front of him turned left.

He said, he decided there was no time to do another thing but to jump off the bike and let it slide alone.


here is the question: I've seen guys saying hang on to the bike no matter what and others saying, jump off it and let it slide alone. pic here:
http://www.lun.com/Pages/NewsDetail.aspx?dt=2014-07-04&PaginaId=2&bodyid=0


Looking at the burgman design, to me I'd look more safe to hang on to the bike as the body work should take the damage.


you guys, what do you think its the best when going down riding the BURGMAN?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
425 Posts
Hmm, this is like asking, do I want to kill myself with a knife, or do I want to kill myself with an axe?

If there are no cars around you to hit you when you jump off, then I'd say jump off. But, if there are cars traveling at 35 mph and you jump off then they hit you, well....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
375 Posts
I think if a car hits you, it isn't going to matter very much if you're hanging on to the bike or not. On the other hand, if you are hanging on and the bike hits something and starts to flip, it could land on you and do some serious damage. It's best to let the bike go so you can be as far away from it as possible. Also, trying to hang on is a good way to injure your hands/wrists/arms.

My vote would be to let go and get some distance between you and the motorcycle.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,296 Posts
The policeman was clearly an untrained and inexperienced rider whose story just defies logic.

1. If he had time to think ' oh goodness something bad is happening and I do not have time to apply the brakes - so I will just jump off my bike' then ipso-facto he had enough time to brake.

2. I am sorry I am not clever enough to read the linked Spanish article, but my counter proposition (taken from the illustrations) is that if you can jump off a bike and your body comes to rest before it is danger of hitting the target then there was enough time and distance to brake to avoid a collission.

In truth adrenaline is brown and in times like this untrained people respond by 'flight'. After the event they concoct a story to cover up their inadequacy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,060 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
this is causing a serious debate over here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,060 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
fernando, I tend to agree with Norm.
Yeah, me too, something doesn't add up on his story, as aside note, he was off duty riding his own bike.

maybe I should have asked, what do you think its best when falling off, hanging on or let the bike go... if you're about to crash and nobody is behind you
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,260 Posts
I've been in two crashes in my years of riding. In one I don't remember what happened because a concussion wiped a block of time from my memory. The other I do remember. It was a high speed low side followed by a long slide down the road.

The thing that stands out in that memory is that you don't really have a lot of choice. If you are moving at very much speed at all then when the bike goes down you probably can't hold onto it even if you want to. The forces acting to rip the bars from your hands are pretty strong.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,296 Posts
I think there is a world of difference between 'coming off the bike' either high or low side than consciously pulling the black and yellow handle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
492 Posts
When i came off my bike in Scotland then the wheels slipped under hard breaking on loose grit i didnt have time to think.
I realised i was about to go, said ****, and then it happened,I landed with a thump on my shoulder and hip and rolled away from the bike as i didn't want my legs trapped under the frame, as even as stop the engine was still running.
I would not have jumped as it would have risked breaking my legs, Fortunate for me i ended up with badly bruised shoulder and hips with a lovely bruise to the hips. I also had excellent help fro the folks on the Isle of Mull and a nice ride in an ambulance.The bike survived with scratches to the edge of the frame and indeed rode some nearly 4oo miles for home after the event,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
i recently went down because of carelesness and didn't get away from the bike, i skinned my elbow and may have fractured a rib because i held on instead of letting the bike go, i was making a sharp turn at a gas pump. if i had gotten away from the bike i wouldn't have been hurt at all, i think it depends on the situation,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,479 Posts
I can't imagine having enough time to make the decision! I would also think it might be hard to keep hold of the bike depending on what is happening to it and to you as you slide, flip etc...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
709 Posts
I'd like to know how you jump off the moving motorbike, that's not easy to do... And knowing my luck if I did something like that I get run over by Freightliner! Lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,060 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
I'd like to know how you jump off the moving motorbike, that's not easy to do... And knowing my luck if I did something like that I get run over by Freightliner! Lol
lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,666 Posts
Ride it out (I'm assuming a collision scenario here). Your tires have better traction than the Tupperware and/or frame, so braking will slow you down more than sliding will.

And never give up -- you might just be able to steer either past what you're about to hit, or at least hit at some angle other than dead-on, reducing the impact forces. This saved me once on an old Vespa -- I knew I couldn't stop in time, but swerved into someone's driveway and ended up on their lawn instead of embedded into the suddenly-stopped car that had been in front of me.*

Of course if you lock the wheels up the bike's going down, but you'll have scrubbed off a few MPH that the pavement won't then have to scrub away at your riding gear.

If it's a low-side, try to keep your feet on the floorboards rather than "saving it" by putting your foot down -- this keeps your leg out from under the bike as it hits the ground.



*Honestly, I should have left more following distance given the inadequacies of the old bike's brakes. I was probably 17 at the time though, and didn't really know better. (It's amazing I survived my early riding experience relatively unharmed...)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,396 Posts
Ejection custom seat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,489 Posts
I'm pretty much in the Norm camp. Having experienced a recent light weight fender bump and recalling any historical accidents I was involved in, the common thread to all of them is a total lack of conscious, reasoned, decision making during the event. You react, then, at leisure, try to explain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
276 Posts
There's an old adage that you should always take the low side because you're not likely to get hurt, and it might not happen anyway. It also seems to me that your legs are a little less exposed on a scooter than on a motorcycle, leg injuries being among the most frequent type for riders.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top