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Discussion Starter #1
We are both trading up our old 49cc Yamahas which we have been driving for about 6 or 7 years and going to the 400. She we be aware of anything that we have to do differently than what we did in the past? Is it any different driving these bikes? We cannot test drive them, we will in effect, have to buy them blind. All we have been able to do is sit on them.
 

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Hang on tight, and watch your speed and your following distance. :wink:

The 400 will accelerate much faster, and reach much higher top speeds than the "mopeds" did.

Be careful in cornering, because you may inadvertently enter at too high a speed until you get used to it (shouldn't take more than a few miles).

Take a potty break before you get on the bikes, because once you're on you may not want to stop for several hours.

Have fun! 8)
 

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The difference is almost like night and day. If you are hitting the road (no pun intended) without taking a MSF course then keep in mine you are now a main stream driver not a slow side of the road rider.
Stay on the alert for the jerk.
And you should have about 350 cc more fun. :)
 

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Randy's right. Please consider taking the MSF BasicRider Course. Most states offer it. In PA, for example, it's free and the test counts as your M class license test. Lynn and I just passed ours today. :D

Even if you never plan to ride a regular motorcycle, the MSF adds to your confidence and can make you a more aware, more skilled and safer rider.
8)
Bryna
 

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Invincsum said:
...the MSF BasicRider Course. Most states offer it. In PA, for example, it's free and the test counts as your M class license test. ...
You're lucky. In Washington the state subsidized classes (which fill up way in advance) are $100, and the unsubsidized classes are more than $200.

But successful completion does, as in PA (and most states, I assume), waive the license/endorsement test.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The Motorcycle class licence

Luckily, where we come from, which was Quebec, Canada, and being older, our licence came with the "M" Class, so we don't have to pass anything to drive the bikes.

I am still a bit nervous about the change up to such a bigger bike from what I had, especially for my wife, who still gets nervous in heavy traffic and on the two lane secondary highways with cars wanting to pass us at our slower speeds
 

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Re: The Motorcycle class licence

michaelbyrns said:
I am still a bit nervous about the change up to such a bigger bike from what I had, especially for my wife, who still gets nervous in heavy traffic and on the two lane secondary highways with cars wanting to pass us at our slower speeds
I believe a couple of days on the Burgman and you'll easily get over being nervous at the size. Once you get comfortable with it, the 400 is more than capable of keeping up with traffic at highway speeds. No need for traffic to be piled up behind you.
 

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Hi Michael,

One thing I've found (and the MSF RiderCoach reinforced) is that if you find yourself with tailgaters, find a place where you can signal and then pull over. I don't do that often (I usually ride the speed limit with ease), but did on Friday when I took a vacation day and did a 75-mile ride.

You'll probably hear or have heard "It's your ride" or "Ride your own ride." For me, that means not letting tailgaters spoil my day. Waving them past means I can ride my own ride and not force myself to ride faster on previously untraveled territory and just relax.

The Burgie will more than keep up in traffic. But ride how and where you feel most comfortable. Then you can "enjoy the ride"! :D

Bryna

P.S. Thanks for the kudos, Randy! It sure feels great! :)
 

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While I have rode alot of different bikes over the years, my current ride is a 49cc Vento Triton R4. The first time I sat on a Burgman, I was a little intimidated to say the least. Luckily for me at my local dealer, I have alot of friends who work there. I got to take the 400 and 650 out for a test ride the other day. I LOVED IT!!!!! It did'nt take me very long to get the hang of it. WONDERFUL AT LOW AND HIGH SPEEDS. You should be able to make the transition very easily.

JD
 

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Invincsum said:
One thing I've found (and the MSF RiderCoach reinforced) is that if you find yourself with tailgaters, find a place where you can signal and then pull over. I don't do that often (I usually ride the speed limit with ease), but did on Friday when I took a vacation day and did a 75-mile ride.

You'll probably hear or have heard "It's your ride" or "Ride your own ride." For me, that means not letting tailgaters spoil my day. Waving them past means I can ride my own ride and not force myself to ride faster on previously untraveled territory and just relax.

The Burgie will more than keep up in traffic. But ride how and where you feel most comfortable. Then you can "enjoy the ride"! :D

Bryna

P.S. Thanks for the kudos, Randy! It sure feels great! :)
I (a new rider) went beyond my capabilities yesterday and drove down Topanga Canyon (Southern Calif) from Woodland Hills to where it ends at the Pacific Ocean in Malibu (for those familiar). The road consits of multiple twists & turns as you go over the huge Santa Monica Mountains for 16 miles worth. I must have pulled over at least a dozen times to let other cars pass. Problem is, you have to keep going until there's a spot wide enough to allow you to pull over and let the car pass!

- Chuck
 
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