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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The last couple of times I rode my 650, I noticed a smell of gasoline lingering in the garage after I came home. I didn't buy gas recently.

Does anyone else have this ? Anyone have an idea how I can stop it? My garage is attached to the house and the gasoline can even be smelled inside.

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Bill but in that case there was gas leaking too. I have no gas leak, only the smell.

I see others have had the problem too so maybe it's just a flaw in the scoot.
 

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If you read Paul's post in that thread, he sometimes has a fuel smell after parking his scoot and believes it's just pressure venting from the tank. I'd just watch for a fuel leak to be sure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yup, Bill I'd read that enitre thread.

I hope it's not something I'll just have to live with since I always pull in the garage when I get home and really don't want to have a gas smell every time I ride nor do I want to have to leave the scoot outside and remember to bring it in later.

If anyone has ideas on how I might be able to get rid of the gas smell, please let me know. I've searched the archives and haven't seen any solutions.

Thanks
 

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How about parking in front of the garage while you divest yourself of your ridin' accoutrements carry the shopping inside etc.

This will give time for the tank to 'fart' if it needs to and the 'whiff' to disperse.

If the garage subsequently smells then you must have a leak.

:wink:
 

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I park my Burgy in the basement (old house where the garage is in the basement with two swinging doors for access). Since the oil furnace is at the far side of the basement, and I am not interested in any big explosions :shock: in the middle of the night, I momentarily open up the gas cap to let any pressure vent out before closing the basement door (there's always pressure in there).

I am in and out of the basement numerous times during the day/evening and have never smelled any gasoline fumes since I started manually venting the fuel tank.

If this was a regular motorcycle with the gas tank between the knees and a gravity feed to the carburator, then the bike would have to stay outside. But with the Burgman's fuel tank location and the use of an electric fuel pump, the chances of fuel leak are fairly remote. 8)
 

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The occasional gas smell with mine is not easily noticed unless I lift the seat to access the trunk. It is not overly strong either. If you are getting a strong gasoline odor when parked, you should probably have it checked out.
 

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Is there a charcoal canister for fuel vapor recovery on the Burgmans? If there is, then there shouldn't be any gas smell unless there's a leak somewhere.
 

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If you're riding around in the cold, then when you park it in a warm area it's going to heat up. Gasoline, and especially gasoline vapors expand when warmed. You should expect a cold gas container of any kind to "vent" as the contents warm up. I don't know about the evaporative canister - but it might vent less if you park it full rather than empty. Gas tanks literally breathe in and out as the heat and cool, and the less air space that is in the tank, the less it will breathe. It's good to keep it full in the winter to help keep moisture out of the tank (the venting in and out brings in moisture).
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Robert said:
If you're riding around in the cold, then when you park it in a warm area it's going to heat up. Gasoline, and especially gasoline vapors expand when warmed. You should expect a cold gas container of any kind to "vent" as the contents warm up. I don't know about the evaporative canister - but it might vent less if you park it full rather than empty. Gas tanks literally breathe in and out as the heat and cool, and the less air space that is in the tank, the less it will breathe. It's good to keep it full in the winter to help keep moisture out of the tank (the venting in and out brings in moisture).
Robert - you might have hit on it. Yesterday I had to fill the tank and I noticed almost no gas smell when I parked. The tank must have been pretty empty the days I was smelling the most.

I'm going to keep an eye on it and see if that's what it is.

Thanks for the response.
 

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I think I have a leak. I just rode my 650 to work for the first time today. I filled up before I left (overfilled a bit by accident). Rode to work (about 10 miles) and when I arrived several co-workers wanted to see the machine. It was on the side stand and one co-worker mentioned the smell and another the dripping underneath. I looked up under the bike and a steady drip was coming down the gas tank (it was not dripping from a hose). I stood the bike on the center stand and the drip stopped from all I can tell. The fuel level still reads as "full" so I will check it a few more times and see if it leaking again or if the level drops.
 

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If it were coming from the fill area and dribbling down the fill tube or overflow tube - then overfilling it might be the culprit and the only problem - but if you rode 10 miles then that should have taken care of any excess.

There are 4 connections at the top of the gas tank that it could leak from. If it was leaking at the tank, then it should have been leaking while you were riding it - and I'm really surprised that you didn't smell it. It also shouldn't have stopped when put onto the centerstand. Check the fitting of the overflow tube tothe drain in the fill area - that sounds like the likely culprit to me.
 

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Petcock?

My old scoot had a gas leak but was leaking so slowly it evaporated before dripping to the floor of the garage. It was a faulty petcock. Don't know if the Burgmans have one.

If anyone needs assistance or information on removing/replacing the fuel pump or filter or assembly just ask. I'm an expert now! :?

Dee
 

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hi RED L.E.D. ELDER

I have the exact same problem and found that the fuel pump case is cracked this is the round white plastic part you find above the fuel tank that is locked in place by a large black platic locknut. to make sure this is the problem remove the battery, starter solenoid, and grey plastic part that holds the battery that is over the gas tank and is under the seat, then you can have a look at this part. to see where the leak is coming from get some soapy water and pour some over the fuel pump case. shake the bike a little bit ( to evaporate some fuel) and when you see the bubbles forming you have your located your leak. best shot is to replace the entire part that costs about 90$. You could, although I wouldn't recommend it, put some crazy glue or epoxy over the crack to seal it, but this would be just temporary.
 

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Re: Petcock?

ScubaGirl said:
My old scoot had a gas leak but was leaking so slowly it evaporated before dripping to the floor of the garage. It was a faulty petcock. Don't know if the Burgmans have one.

If anyone needs assistance or information on removing/replacing the fuel pump or filter or assembly just ask. I'm an expert now! :?

Dee
Well one definition of an expert is

ex= has been
spurt = drip under pressure


However I know you are neither and are the foremost Burgman reassembler/reviver on the forum. :)
 

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Re:

Schlepp said:
hi RED L.E.D. ELDER

I have the exact same problem and found that the fuel pump case is cracked this is the round white plastic part you find above the fuel tank that is locked in place by a large black platic locknut. to make sure this is the problem remove the battery, starter solenoid, and grey plastic part that holds the battery that is over the gas tank and is under the seat, then you can have a look at this part. to see where the leak is coming from get some soapy water and pour some over the fuel pump case. shake the bike a little bit ( to evaporate some fuel) and when you see the bubbles forming you have your located your leak. best shot is to replace the entire part that costs about 90$.
Wow this exact thing happened to me today.

I went to Wally World and got a new battery and installed it. Ran the bike for a while and everything was humming so I shut it off and went inside.

An hour or so later I came out and started the bike again to take off and fuel was gushing out of there like a sprinkler head.

I came on here and got my question answered again. :thumbup:

I hope I can get that part instead of the whole pump for $450. You still got the part # ?

Thanks
 

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Mikeyman
Did you think to look at the date of the post it is dated 2005. That is over five years old. Some of us old folks do not live forever and the person may no longer be a member. You would do better to give him a PM and hope for the best.


You got lucky or did you look?

Schlepp
Last visited:
Tue Feb 08, 2011 9:39 09

Money well spent

viewtopic.php?f=1&t=50771&start=25
 

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Re:

billmeek said:
If you read Paul's post in that thread, he sometimes has a fuel smell after parking his scoot and believes it's just pressure venting from the tank. I'd just watch for a fuel leak to be sure.
After I got my 650 in '08, I too noticed that in my bike but after I tightened the hoses on the tank, it pretty went away. And I live in SE Arizona, where its very HOT and DRY in the summer. Even a 100+ degrees in my garage, and an empty tank, the venting is minimal, especially after I tightened the hoses. During this time of year you should not have much (if any) 'venting', though. Anyways, as a start, you might wish to check the tightness of all your fuel tank and line hose clamps.


Vapor emissions, including those resulting from leaks of liquid fuel, can be classified into five categories: diurnal, hot soak, running loss, resting loss, and refueling loss.

* Hot-soak emissions occur after vehicle operation has been terminated.
* Running-loss emissions occur as the tank is heated during vehicular operation.
* Resting-loss emissions include escape of fuel vapor by means of permeation of nonmetallic components of the fuel system while the vehicle engine is not operating.
* Refueling emissions consist of the fuel vapor displaced from the tank headspace by the new liquid fuel being pumped into the tank.

If the tank is supposed to be sealed (up to a predetermined pressure), and the ambient temps are cool to cold, then vapor pressure should be low, and no 'venting' of fuel tank pressure should occur. If 'venting' does occur, then that implies there is some sort of 'valve' - if the valve is malfunctioning, well, that could be the source of vented fumes, especially in cooler weather when pressures are lower.

Anyways, I found this regarding motorcycle emissions....Good information to know:

http://www.sportrider.com/features/146_ ... index.html
 
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