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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, I have just gotten a 2003 400 and filled up the tank. Rode a very little bit, and now I'm on just over half. I thought these got 50mpg+?! Please help. It's my first gas bike. Just moved up from an electric one.
 

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Maybe the gauge is telling lies, only way to tell is zero the trip when you fill the tank
ride say 100 miles refill and work out the MPG from that.
100 miles / by say 2 gall = 50mpg
 

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You don't say where you're from, but I had a similar rude awakening with my 2011 400 that I just purchased. It seems that fuel economy is dreadful in cold weather. Near freezing, I was averaging around 40-43 indicated mpg. We've had a dearth of warm days thus far this year, but on one day with 50°F temps I was able to manage 50 mpg as indicated on the readout. I'll also second what Ralph had to say. It seems that the display reads 2-3 mpg lower than what your real fuel economy is. The advice given to me was to stop worrying about it and wait until the weather improves. Oh, and make sure your tires are properly inflated.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Hi, I'm in AZ. I'm not sure if there is anywhere to get it looked at. No dealerships for Suzuki bikes here. Just cars.
 

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The first step, as already has been suggested, is to calculate your consumption accurately. Fill the tank to the brim, ride for around 120 miles and refill the tank to the brim. Then calculate by using the quantity of fuel to top up the second time and divide by the elapsed mileage.
Report your findings and we can determine if the problem is a real one.
 

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Gas gauges are notoriously inaccurate.
On my '09 650 I get low fuel indication when I still have 5 litres left in a 15 litre tank.

What Norm and the others said ^ .... calculate fuel consumption by miles travelled vs. fill up amount.
After a few trips to the gas station you'll be able to figure out how far off your fuel gauge is.
 

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My indicated MPG is about 3-4 MPG low.
 

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Like others, I agree you should do a measured mileage check.

Unlike others, I wouldn't wait until you've ridden a three figure distance on an unknown situation. I'd recommmend brimming the tank, then ride about 50 miles, and refill.
At a 50 mile distance, even if you learn you have a major issue and truly terrible consumption (say 25mpg), you will still have gas in the tank when you top up.

At 100-120miles, you could be pushing it for the last quarter of the way. So it's just a case of erring on the side of caution.

But the main point is to determine what your baseline figure is.
There are a number of factors which will determine this. For insatance, a 100lb rider, who starts the bike and rides off, should expect a lower consumption rate than a a 250lb rider, who lets the bike run and warm up for several minutes before riding off. Then there are temperature/gas mixture/terrain/riding style/Etc. factors.

I can say that as someone on the wrong side of 200lbs, living in Florida (with the 10% Ethanol mixture), flat terrain, and hot temperatures, I average around 48mpg, riding almost flat out for the short distances between the red lights, where I seem to spend about 1/3 of my time.
If I get onto the open road and can cruise at 60-65mph, I bring this up to well over 60mpg.

I'm happy with that. Your figures may well be different. But first you need to establish what they are.
 

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You stated you have a 2003 a 10 year old bike. There are many contributing factors to mpg including clean filters, spark plug, gas/air mix, worn belt, rollers, clutch, and the actual fuel being used. I have found the most critical and controllable of these is the regular cleaning of the idle adjust screw (gas/air mix). It might be a good idea to see if the scooter has been regularly maintained and everything up to snuff. That is if the fuel gauge is not the issue.
I will say that the normal movement of the gas gauge is definitely not linear! :roll:
 

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Any resolution on this?
 

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I have noticed on my 2006 that it takes forever to move the fuel needle at all, but it eventually gets there if I have patience. Once it is there, I usually get between 55 and 65 MPG, depending on where and how I drive. If I shut of the machine and restart it, it still takes awhile for the gauge to move but it moves faster than it did the first startup. Just watch the gauge and calculate mileage like previously suggested. Then you can see if there is a problem. Just remember to give it a little while to move. The needle is like a 90 year old man on these things!
 

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I have noticed I get considerably better milage on a trip (60+ gpm) than I do on short commutes (50 gpm). Not sure if it is the extra energy it takes to warm up the engine on multiple short commutes or the higher average speed and constant speed of a longer trip. In either case, it is a LOT better milage than even my fairly economical Mini Cooper
 

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It takes about 6 miles for my 2010 to fully warm up and start to get good MPG but most of my trips are longer than that
and it often gets over 70 mpg US it is better in the 50/60 mph range than slower.
 
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