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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
As I stated elsewhere on this forum I have had problems with the tailpiece above the number plate. It is held on with 2 (fragile) hooks on each side, one slide-in tongue, and a small push pin underneath on each side - all of which have proved to be not up to the job as losing this piece is a fairly common complaint. Two of the hooks on one side of my tailpiece had broken off necessitating making new ones out of Perspex and fitting them using a white plastic mix. I also added the plastic mix to strengthen the other vulnerable fixings while I was about it. I also drilled a small hole in the bottom centre of the piece and fitted a small screw to attach a tether( the red wire) from there to the left-hand rear-light screw (the left-hand light screw is best because should the tailpiece come loose it will dangle to the left, away from the hot exhaust) I increased the size of the holes for the two underneath pushpins to 8mm and fitted suitable larger pins. I hope the pix is clear enough.
 

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Replacing the 2 plastic push pins on the bottom with cable ties will solve the problem and keep this cover in place. :thumbup:
 

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Also, have you replaced the rubber cushion/grommet that fits on the top? My rear tail piece started rattling. I replaced the cushion and the rattling stopping. I think the cushion does quite a bit to hold the tail piece on.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Ken said:
Replacing the 2 plastic push pins on the bottom with cable ties will solve the problem and keep this cover in place. :thumbup:
Yes, but that doesn't strengthen the four weak 'hooks' - and I don't want things cable-tied.
 

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Ken said:
Replacing the 2 plastic push pins on the bottom with cable ties will solve the problem and keep this cover in place. :thumbup:
+1 If you use a small black cable tie and trim it near the place where it comes out of the lock you can't see it and I have never heard of anyone having problems with the tailpiece after this fix. If you ever need to remove it to get to the lights just cut them off with a pair of dikes and reinstall new ones.
 

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+1 The cable tie method is cheap, secure,and is not seen unless you have it up fairly high on a lift table or jack stand. :thumbup:
 

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I've had cable ties in my for a couple of years now.
 

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that's a nice solution, you just want to make sure that the emergency cable is not too long as you can run the risk of the piece being caught between the rear fender and the rear wheel if it ever comes loose which could lead to the rear wheel locking up at speed and ending in a crash.

I would vote for the zip tie solution, less to worry about and quite cheap and practical
 

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The lower frame cover is tricky to remove without causing damage and along with the legside covers where they connect to the lower leg shield cover which are also easy to damage are the poorest bit of Tupperware execution on the Lardy.

I rarely see a Lardy without damage to these areas, invariably they are dealer maintained too!
 

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The only unbroken parts on mine are the large central tab and one plastic push-rivet. Didn't notice it for a month after buying the Burg, but didn't seem like it would fall off. Better get out the zip ties.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Marv said:
Ken said:
Replacing the 2 plastic push pins on the bottom with cable ties will solve the problem and keep this cover in place. :thumbup:
+1 If you use a small black cable tie and trim it near the place where it comes out of the lock you can't see it and I have never heard of anyone having problems with the tailpiece after this fix. If you ever need to remove it to get to the lights just cut them off with a pair of dikes and reinstall new ones.
On reflection, a couple of hidden cable ties are the best solution to the problem of losing the tailpiece. The only thing I would add is to always carry two similar cable ties in case of forced roadside removal of the tailpiece.
 

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First of all bc65925 welcome to this dang forum :hello2: :lol:

You may wish to post in the 'who are you where are you from' to introduce yourself properly into polite society (and update your profile with your location).

Where have you been all these years?

Thank you for posting your videos, I enjoyed them both enormously and found them both entertaining and informative.

I absolutely love your barn and I want it, problem is it is way bigger than my house and plot!! :)

The tailpiece is a poorly designed piece in terms of location and fixing and the tabs are easily broken, although I have never seen the plastic 'mortise' - (the bit that has the rubber sleeve) broken and I was entertained by the 'Kentucky Engineering'.

By the way I noticed in your drawing that you had made a small error, which has no consequence for you but could lead the unwary into making a very large bracket, your metric conversions are incorrect.

Thank you for your post.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
The guys back-of-a-*** packet drawing is not ideal. It would be nice if a clear (stationary) picture was available.
 

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peelbrow said:
The guys back-of-a-*** packet drawing is not ideal. It would be nice if a clear (stationary) picture was available.
I gave up fags back in 1977. :D I smoked Camel non-filter fags. But sometimes you just grab a piece of paper to sketch out whats on the mind at the time, I used the foil from a Cig pack to make a fuse more than once.......
 

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Maybe BC65925 could give the cut dimensions before its hammered into the finished shape is what I think is wanted above.
 

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Have to agree, the tail section as pictured and commented about in the OP and other posts is not very well thought out or engineered. I'd luv to meet some of the people they get to work with the these products and others in real world experiments. Seems to me that few really do more than simple basic tests in lab like conditions if one can call it that. I found similar problems with the tail section on my K7 (K3 seems good). The right lower underside push-pull plastic grommet fastener broke (guess I was little rough with it on removal - fiddling with a small flat-head screw driver and all in a restricted space with muffler etc) and even when I replaced the fastener with a new one it didn't hold well. The two midsection plastic mounts broke too. Since then I drilled two small holes where the lower tail section and upper tail section overlap, and then inserted two small push-pull plastic grommet fasteners that help compensate for the two broken midsection mounts. These two plastic grommets hold well. From time to time the right lower underside push-pull plastic grommet fastener lets go a little if I ride on anything too knarly (which in mainland China is quite often), but it doesn't let go or hang. I had considered cable ties, but they can be bloody difficult to undo or cut through when pulled tight, if one doesn't have a blade to cut with. Bit like a fire extinguisher with a cable tie or similar to stop the safety "pin" from being pulled accidentally. I've seen a few people over the years struggle like anything trying to break this type of tie so they can then pull the pin to be able to squeeze the extinguisher handle.

YMMV
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Dave_J said:
Maybe BC65925 could give the cut dimensions before its hammered into the finished shape is what I think is wanted above.
No. I mean the flat cut dimensions plus the finished article dimensions with angles. (this could easily be made from a wire coat-hanger)
 

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If one was determined to do this sort of fix, and I am not convinced it is wholly neccesary, a better solution may be:
a. At the business end of the above modification which achieves a new central lower locating fixing screw.
b. Substitute the bendy plate with an alternative which -
c. Is essentially a plate with a 20mm right angle flange which is inserted through a slot newly cut into the rear fender at the strategically cunning height. :)
d. Pass the tongue of the plate through the slot and secure the flange (which is wheel side) with two screws, grind off excess screw with a dremel.
e. Seal any gaps in the slot with silicon gloop.
f. The tongue is then 'adjusted to sui't and to be able to accept the locating screw.
 
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