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Discussion Starter #1
just filled up with my first tank of gas today after 150 miles. According to my calculations I am getting between 37 and 42 mpg. Since the gas gauge has four segments can I assume that each segment represents one gallon (since its a four gallon tank). Also, how much farther can I ride once both the "gas pump" and the first segment of the gauge starts flashing. I think the manual says something like ten miles but am wondering what most riders are seeing?

I also though I could go farther than 150 miles on one tank so either I could have gone quite a bit farther on the tank or my dealer didn't fill it up to completely full before I picked it up.

thanks
 

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Hi beanpole.
First off on my gas gauge there are 5 segments (650k3) The gas tank holds 15 litres/4gallons
I get on average 18kms/litre or 41miles/gallon I use this as a coservative measure to ensure I don't run dry.
So on a full tank I can travel 270 kms or 165 miles. With that being said I tried one time when I first got the machine to see how far I could push it and ran the tank dry at 300kms or 180 miles

Now when you get down to the last segment flashing along with the fuel pump symbol flashing you have approx. 1.5 litres or .39 gallons wich roughly converts to 27 kms or 16 miles.

I always use one of the odometers as a guide and reset it every time I fill up.
Hope this helps

BTW the above gallons are US gallons. Hope I did my conversions right.
 

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First of all I'll say I don't know for sure how far I can go with that fuel pump flashing - and don't really want to run out of gas to find out. I usually look for a gas station at that point.

Secondly, your mileage is going to improve as the engine breaks in. I've gotten over 50 mpg, and usually get 47 or 48. I have 4500 miles on my scoot - but by the third tank or so of gas I was getting decent mileage.

Last night I did have to ride a ways with that thing flashing. It seems like they dug up the gas pumps at the station nearest to me - nothing there but a hugh crater in the ground!. I rode for probably 5 or 6 miles, and it took 3.08 gallons to fill it up.

What I usually do is set one trip meter to zero when I fill up. When I get to 150 miles, I fill up at the next convenient place. I don't entirely trust the gas gauge. I seriously doubt that it is as linear as 1 gallon per bar. It seems to me that the top two bars take a lot longer to disappear than the next two.

Anyway, I start thinking about getting gas at 150 miles, and immediately ride into the nearest station if that pump starts flashing. Works for me.
 

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I follow the same format as Paul. Ifill up at 150 miles. I'm averaging 47-48 mpg. It seems my bike reads full for about 100 miles then it drops quickly. No rhyme or reason. Weird fuel guage.

Eddie
 

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The fuel level sensor must be set the same on all the burgy's. Mine does the same.....the fifth bar seems to hang around a little longer than the rest. Each bar seems to disappear quicker than the previous one. And there is something about that little flashing fuel pump.....that just makes one get a little nervous and turn into a gas station.
 

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Mileage

:D

If my dealer filled the tank as he said, Before I picked up my new Burgman 650, I used 2.8 gallons before the low fuel warning came on. Computes to 39 MPG. THis is a new scooter and It sounds like about 150 miles before fill up. I will know better after this weekend. Its beautiful out and I plan to do a lot of riding.


Mike

In Florida
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Hey, you're right, the fuel gauge has five segments instead of four. I guess my dealer didn't fill the tank to totally full when I picked it up after all. He owes me a gallon of gas!
 

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Pesimistic gauge

This tank is hard to fill ; automatic nozzles turn off way too soon. and, its easy to overflow if you try too hard.

When my last segment was showing with the flash warning, I could only get 2 gal. into the tank. hmmm. Whats the capacity 4.0?
 

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Hi ABM

Thats why I allways reset one of the odometers. Just in case there is an inaccuracie or a malfunction. I don't want to push this beast.
 

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Allwalk et al,

Good sense being talked here. The manual does state that each bar represents 3 litres, but I'm sure everyone here has been riding for 150kms with all five bars lit, and then suddently finds that they are down to three...

I get about 20km/litre, so try to fill up around the 270kms mark. I had to ride with the fuel warning flasher (1.5 litre indicator or roughly 30kms) on for 20kms two weeks ago, and took the thing all the way to 290kms on a single tank two up - at the nearest station I could find, it took 14.30 litres to fill up... I could not have gone much further.

Interesting note is that Japanese motorcycles are designed to give you the reserve or fuel warning light 30kms at an average speed of 60km/40mph before you run dry. This is basically the case on the 650, Relfex, x11, RVF etc.

So the moral of the story is: if the fuel warning light comes on ride, smoothly and slowly and you if there's a gas stand within 20 miles you won't run dry.
 

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I don't know why, but I've been getting 55mpg rather consistently. Perhaps due to rural highway driving rather than start/stop urban driving. I generally motor at 75-80 mph, on the speedometer, that is. I would assume that 80 mph is really 75 and 75 is actually 70.

I did take it up to over 100 mph indicated. Once again, how fast I was actually going is open to conjecture.

Another possible explanation for the fuel mileage might have something to do with the high altitude - 5000-6000 feet?
 

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Ted,

Rural highway riding does help the mileage figure. I think your machine is still in stock configuration too. After I added the big windscreen and the Givi trunk, I dropped from the low 50's into the high 40's for mileage, probably due to increased wind resistance. No big deal. The added comfort and carrying capacity is worth the slight drop off in mileage to me.

Also, yours had a few miles on it when you bought it I think. The worst mileage is during that first tank or two on a brand new machine when the engine is still very tight.

55 mpg is excellent, considering that you are running 75 - 80 mph, so maybe the altitude does contribute some advantage also.
 

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Pauljo:

Yes, mine is completely stock, and today it's rather clean as I just washed it for the first time.

Perhaps you've posted this before and I've just forgotten, but what kind of "big windscreen" did you get? I've got to do something about this helmet wind noise. If I stand completely up on the footrests, the buffeting noise disappears.

Did the larger windscreen help?
 

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Mileage

Hello All,

My Burgy gets about 40 miles to the gallon, per my calculation (city driving) and my gas gauge is way off. With 2 bars lit on the gas gauge, I ran my tank dry once and had to call AAA to come give me gas because I wasn't about to push this 600 pounder several miles to a gas station! I don't know if this was a one time deal with the faulty reading on the gas gauge, but I don't use it anyway. I reset the odometer on fuel up to full tank, and at 120 miles I re-fuel. I don't like the idea of banking heavily on turns and having the gas swish around inside the tank and sucking in air into the fuel line and having the engine die on me in a turn. My fuel gauge seemed accurate when I bought the bike (blinking fuel symbol took little over 3.5 gals of fuel to reach full tank) but now I'm not sure. Doesn't matter to me anyway.... still LOVE the Burgy. Still get looks from people who've never seen a mega-scooter. Still outrun most cars and some unsuspecting motorcyclists!

John :D
 

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Ted,

I tried a Givi windscreen (which comes in only one size, but was the first one available). Then I switched to Clearview, which does a much better job for me. Clearview makes windscreens for the Burgman 650 in four or five different heights - I'm sure they have one that would work for you. It does help immensely.

Contact information:
800-798-6089
[email protected]

See my windscreen pics -
http://burgmanusa.com/gallery/pauljo_clearview
 

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Mines doing pretty good I spose

I'm getting between 50- 60 miles per gallan on my bike. When the bar starts flashing I fill up and it is right at three gallons. So I spose I could go for another 50 miles in a pinch. Don't really want to chance it though. BTW I commute 60 miles per day 70-75mph
 

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20km/litre basically equates to 55mpg (imperial gallons) or 47mpg (US gallons), Ted so may be recording simlar figures to you. This is 2-up with luggage (with some stop and start at the beginning and end of each weekend journey as I leave and return to Tokyo) so I'm sure that I could get far more than that if i was riding solo.

I'm not certain that riding at altitude will help fuel economy or worsen it. Engines are more efficient and powerful when air is dense, and the higher you go the less dense the air becomes - which is why you can become out of breath easily on a steep rock climb nera the summit, and why smaller engined machines lack go when above 6000ft. I spend most of my weekends above 5000ft (you are lucky to live in such Alpine conditions). The highest road in Japan is 8900ft up - the RVF400 felt distinctly breathless up there, whereas the 1100 naked was fine.

This low air density at high altitude is also why you have to be careful on downward runs out of the mountains, as the engine is suddenly making and torque and power were before it only made noise, and you can find yourslef picking up speed unexpectedly quickly. It would probably follow that you need to rev the bike more at alititude than at sea level, and therefore use more fuel.

This is another reason why winter touring can be so much 'fun', as the bike is it's most powerful when grip is at it's least...

Naturally, riding at a constant speed and constant throttle pressure will help the economy as engines are most inefficient when they are throttled to accelerate. Expect a decrease in economy if you fit aftermarket mufflers.
 

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lycheed said:
Expect a decrease in economy if you fit aftermarket mufflers.
I'm not so sure that a less restrictive exhaust would hurt mileage. I put Remus cannisters on my Suzuki V-Strom, which is also a fuel injected twin, some time ago. I don't recall any significant change in mileage. I get about 44 mpg with that 1000cc beast.

But I'll know for sure soon, because I have a Remus exhaust cannister ordered for my Burgman 650. This model cannister will have a noise limiter that can be fitted or removed as desired. If it is not too much effort to change over, I'll try to get some mileage readings both with & without the noise limiter installed.
 
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