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One of the worst maintenance tasks on the 650 seems to be removing and replacing the front fender. It must come off to remove the front wheel. There are 2 bolts on the inner side of the fender that must be removed/reinstalled. There is so little room to work in there while the wheel is on that it's a very slow and frustrating task.:confused:

Folks here seem to come up with all sorts of simple solutions, and I'm hoping that there's one for this. I was considering cutting off the nose of the fender, but that might look odd. It's also difficult to see how to raise the front end enough to get the wheel off with the fender in place.

Help!
 

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When I painted mine, I took the fender off without removing the wheel. I also put it back on with the wheel on. I do suggest getting a boxed ratched (hope i said that right). Small hands help too.

To jack up the front we took a small piece of 2x4, about 4 inches square and placed it on a floor jack. There is a small piece of frame where you can rest it against. Probably not the best practice, but it did work very well.
 

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You don't have to remove the fender to remove the front wheel. I just put on a new tire and simply jacked up the bike using a scissor jack under the engine to lift the bike after loosening all the bolts first. Wheel came right out and went back in without having to remove the fender. Did have to remove one brake caliper to get the wheel back on though.
 

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Agree with SteveE Changed my front tire & didn't need to remove the fender. I did remove both calipers though.
 

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You don't have to remove the fender to remove the front wheel. I just put on a new tire and simply jacked up the bike using a scissor jack under the engine to lift the bike after loosening all the bolts first. Wheel came right out and went back in without having to remove the fender. Did have to remove one brake caliper to get the wheel back on though.
Me too.
 

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Never have removed the front fender on mine to remove the front wheel either.

I've only taken it off one time and after trying to reach those bolts you are talking about I decided it's a lot easier to take the wheel off first then remove the fender.
 

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A 10mm box end ratchet wrench does the trick, though it's still a fingertip excercise. Not sure what genius decided it was a good idea. Maybe front fender theft is an issue in Japan?
 

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Same as everyone else replying... no need whatsoever to remove the front mudguard (fender) just to remove the front wheel.

I've had the front wheel off several times on both my K3 and K7. I just place a small hydraulic bottle jack under the engine, making sure to loosen off the axle and the two brake calliper securing bolts first. I also use a couple of axle stands which I place under the front forks (just in case) while the wheel is off, although I've been known to use some wood cribbing placed alongside the hydraulic jack.

If one doesn't have a lifting jack then a couple of regular sized bricks or short lengths of 4x2 (wood) will do; put the scoot on the centre stand, then slide one brick/bit of 4x2 either side in line with the centre stand feet, when ready carefully lean the scoot over enough to slide the brick/4x2 under the stand foot - repeat on the other side. This elevates the scoot several inches (I do this for working on the back wheel). Also have additional bricks or short lengths of 4x2 handy. Have someone sit on the pillion seat so that front wheel raises of the 'deck' so that one can slide the cribbing under the engine. Pillion can hop off at this point.

Once the front wheel is off, then it's far easier to remove the front fender on most bikes, and the Burgy650 is no different, suggesting this is the method the manufacturer(s) have in mind.

I've been known to employ variations of this on some of my bikes that don't have a centre stand, by cribbing under each side of the rear swing-arm when I've needed to work on a bikes rear wheel. Easy enough to do on my own, by again lining the cribbing up ready to be slid under the swing-arm as I lean/tilt the bike to one side, followed by the other.

YMMV.
 
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