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Discussion Starter #1
I've noticed over the last few days that when I make a left turn, the front end feels like it's slipping out from under me. This became (almost) painfully apparant last Friday afternoon when I made a left turn out of my subdivision on to a main street. It's been a constant thing so I thought that maybe something in the street was slippery (since it's dark or close to dawn when I leave in the mornings). However, I haven't seen anything on the way home.

I did a bit of testing today and the front end still feels like it's a bit slippery on the left turns. I'm concerned that if I give it very much power that it will literally bring the bike down. It doesn't happen on right turns.

I checked the tire and there's no unusual wear on either side. The tire may be a few pounds (1 - 3) over inflated since the temps have been cold and now they're back in the 70s (welcome to north Texas) and I set the pressure for the colder weather. The tires probably have less than 1,000 miles on them.

Since I've got a day off this Friday, I wanted to add an investigation to my "to do" list but I don't know what to look for.

Suggestions please? It's only started it within the last couple of weeks.
 

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Steering head bearings ?

Bad wheel bearing on one side on the front or rear wheel ?

Loose swing arm causing a miss alignment ?
 

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fork spring or servicing, your buddy leans left any time you are not on it and locking the forks turned back full left compress them more, maybe some wear or weakness setting in?
 

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Some things to consider:

white lines

Tires warmed up?----coming out of garage they are not---hard throttle on turn?

Age of tire as indicated by DOT numbers on sidewall

We all turn stronger to one way ot the other

Are the tires the exact compound Hoop tested and recommended by Suzuki?

Then Rider experience----over 250,000 miles, maybe 20,000 a year scooter miles= good

Heavy top box----rider heavy and bike overloaded? Tire/wheel cleaners used?

NOW---also based on personal experience and near 300,000 rubber band drive scooters (over 1.5 million 2 wheel miles)

Having owed new TMAX/2 Burgman 400/Silverwing 600/ReFlex/4 Helix------my conclusion is the Burgman400 is the worst handling of the bunch ridden hard and making tires work. I installed new set of Pirelli Diablo----they frightened me, really awful handing in wet/cold/standing water---threw them away. Right now my 22,000 mile left over 2011 is performing well on original Hoop on front, Michelin dual compount on rear (this tire wears round, not square)---might it be better on fresh set of the right hoops?

My conclusion: Burgman ridden with light throttle hand/not making tires work extra hard/ watching entry speed on high speed corners is ok-----push it like in mountains, you might end up in woods
 

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Discussion Starter #5
At less than 14,000 miles??????

How would I check this stuff? I'm going to have to go visually inspect that intersection to begin with.
 

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How do the tires look (cross section)? One side worn compared to the other?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Tires look good.

I'm going to check the weather forecast and see what it's supposed to be next week.* I set them to be a tad over (front) and about right on spot (rear) with the temp to be 30/35 degrees (which was about mid-range at the time (low 20s to low 40s). However, this being Texas and right now the temp is almost 80. The next week or two the average should go down but with the large swings in temps, and the royal pain in the rear to fill these tires, even with angled valve stems, I don't like adding and subtracting air all the time.

I usually set the pressure near the lower end of the temp range and like I said, I give the front a couple of pounds more (according to the gauge), but I also think the gauge is off a tad anyway so I'm probably within a pound or so on the upward side.

I'll check pressure tomorrow when it's cooled down - that may be the answer.

* Just checked, and at this time, we're expecting a front to come in and drop things to the mid-30s to the upper 50s so I'll set the pressure for about 40/45 degrees.
 

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Happy, it sounds suspiciously like a fork leg seal has started to leak it's oil. Is there any sign of a left fork leg seal leaking/weeping? I had this once and the symptoms were the same as you describe. Having said that, it can still be, as the blokes are saying, anyone of a number of things to do with tyres, bearings, steering etc. Are the forks slightly out of alignment (been bent somehow)?
 

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You stated the tires had only about 1000 miles on them. Did you rough them up properly when new? How about the side walls. They need roughing up too. If they still have the mold release on them on the side walls they could possible slip. Before you changed the front tire did you have this problem? Do you lay over more on left turns or right. I believe I read somewhere you can buy a compound to alleviate this problem with new tires.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
No oil leaks noted.

My project list for the bike didn't get done - other things prevailed.

I'm going to do some more testing and check the pressure this weekend after the garage has had time to stablize.

I still can't help but wonder if it's not due to a bit of over inflation. I doubt that enough time in the last week or two has elapsed to make the center of the tire worn enough to indicate over inflation, however, with the nature of bike tires not to flex, that could be the problem. I'll check again this weekend before Monday's ride to work.
 

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You wear the front tire more on the left side, because left hand turns are longer and faster than right hand turns.

Similarly, you are more likely to slip in left hand turns.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I'm not sure but I may have found, at least, part of the reason for the problem.

I got a good look at the area the other day in the light and it seems like the very small gravel from the road suface (smaller than BB size) has piled up there. Why, I don't know, but that would cause a problem, especially since I was accelerating in the turn at that point.

Only time and some more riding (testing I mean :oops: ) will help answer that question.
 

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happytech said:
I've noticed over the last few days that when I make a left turn, the front end feels like it's slipping out from under me. ...The tire may be a few pounds (1 - 3) over inflated since the temps have been cold and now they're back in the 70s (welcome to north Texas) and I set the pressure for the colder weather. The tires probably have less than 1,000 miles on them...
I'd lower the tire pressure to the OEM specs, especially in colder weather.

The front tire has very little weight on it, compared to the rear. It also has very little contact patch. In the summer, you can get away with a smaller contact patch because your tires will heat up from just Texas heat. But in colder temps, you don't get that and need the lower pressure to both introduce more flex in the tire sidewall ...which generates heat...and to increase your contact patch.

Chris
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Daboo said:
I'd lower the tire pressure to the OEM specs, especially in colder weather.

The front tire has very little weight on it, compared to the rear. It also has very little contact patch. In the summer, you can get away with a smaller contact patch because your tires will heat up from just Texas heat. But in colder temps, you don't get that and need the lower pressure to both introduce more flex in the tire sidewall ...which generates heat...and to increase your contact patch.

Chris
That's interesting.

Now, since tire gauges are not always accurate, would a pound either way of the recommended pressure really make a difference in handling or tire life? I'm asking because I think my gauge reads a pound or two low but without a really accurate gauge to test it against (the previous gauge I used died) I've always filled the front to about 27 - 28 psi according to the gauge.

Of course, with the weather going from the mid-30s in the morning to the low- 70s in the afternoon, it's pretty hard to find a temp. Sit it for 55 and it's over-inflated in the afternoon and under inflated in the morning.
 

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I can certainly tell the difference between the recommended 25 and the 28 psi that I run
my front at the scooter being much more responsive at 28, I run the rear at 40 as it runs
too hot for my liking at lower pressures, on Bridgstones but it runs much cooler with a Michelin
on, these are cold settings I don't mess about with them no matter what the weather.
 

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I bought a small digital gauge, from Wally World, its angled shape is ideal for these Burgman air valves, and it's accurate.
 

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trying my best but cannot imagine how tire pressure can be different on left side than right side,, :? little help?
 

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mikeyMarine said:
trying my best but cannot imagine how tire pressure can be different on left side than right side,, :? little help?
Well little Mikey,

Much like the Earth's atmosphere, a tire is like an Ozone layer. It keeps the good gaseous air in and the bad dirt and debris out. Seasons change. This causes air pressure to change inside the tire. Now, not all the air changes at once. One side may be hot while the other is cold. The high pressure air will usually push the low pressure air around causing stormy conditions inside the tire. (This is secret because you can't see inside the tire to know what is happening). With all the changes in the tire's atmosphere, the Ozone (or tread) will wear thin. This degeneration of the tread is compounded with the constant bombardment of dirt and debris. If you get a hole in your tire's Ozone, the atmospheric pressure is depleted causing everything to die, including the rider.

Hope this helps :wink:
 

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utter chaos said:
mikeyMarine said:
trying my best but cannot imagine how tire pressure can be different on left side than right side,, :? little help?
Well little Mikey,

Much like the Earth's atmosphere, a tire is like an Ozone layer. It keeps the good gaseous air in and the bad dirt and debris out. Seasons change. This causes air pressure to change inside the tire. Now, not all the air changes at once. One side may be hot while the other is cold. The high pressure air will usually push the low pressure air around causing stormy conditions inside the tire. (This is secret because you can't see inside the tire to know what is happening). With all the changes in the tire's atmosphere, the Ozone (or tread) will wear thin. This degeneration of the tread is compounded with the constant bombardment of dirt and debris. If you get a hole in your tire's Ozone, the atmospheric pressure is depleted causing everything to die, including the rider.

Hope this helps :wink:
:lol: :lol:
 

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Did you ever figure this out? Just wonderin'
 
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